Anyone have a truly freewheeling bike here?

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TWalker

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Ive built many bikes of different kinds and I have yet to have one truly freewheel. By that I mean:

You use it as a bicycle and pedal around but the engine chain doesn't move and or make noise.

1. You coast freely down hills and no chains are moving.....quiet! and smooth. The only resistance is tire on ground,wind and the miniscule resitance of the insides of your freewheels, bearings in wheels etc.

2. No motor drive chains,clutches, PTO's or transmissions are turning while you use it as a bicycle. Each drive is truly independant; manpower drive, engine power drive and gravity powered drive.

3. Lastly; this is easy we all do it: You motor around without pedaling and your bike pedals are stationary.

It should pedal and coast so easily it could be mistaken for motorless bike except for the added weight.

Thanks and if you have done this tell us how.

PS: I own an HT with shifter kit and this doesn't qualify for me..
Nor does getting off the bike and disconnecting anything like a friction drive.
 
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srdavo

Active Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2006
Messages
3,135
My "old" Currie electric is the closest thing I have to freewheeling, on he motor side. the little drive chain still spins, but there's a clutch roller bearing in the motor sprocket.
My avatar bike, with the Russian engine, is easy to pedal, but it still turns the chain & clutch shaft.

I know what you mean about coasting downhill (with China/Russian kits)......have you ever pulled in the clutch lever on a big downhill & let 'er go? heh heh.... that engine chain really "sings" ! It's kinda scary!

I think the only way to achieve what you are saying is to have a freewheel on the left side (engine side) , but then you'd need another way to start the engine. pull rope ? electric start ?

I believe Papasaun's trike has engine power to one rear wheel & pedal power to the other. (pull start & freewheels.)
 

ZnsaneRyder

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Joined
Jun 19, 2008
Messages
808
I'm in the process of finishing a freewheeling bicycle. Just like you, I want the freedom to actually PEDAL the bike without turning a bunch of extra friction and weight, and also want the ability to coast further and save gas.

The bicycle has a 26" spoke front wheel, and has a 24" rear solid plastic 7-spoke Skyway Tuff-Wheel with Staton left and right threaded hub. It will have a 2.5HP 4-stroke engine.

The drive setup is this:
1st reduction:
Engine/Clutch 10T -chained to- 48T freewheel sprocket on a jackshaft
2nd reduction:
jackshaft 14T sprocket -chained to 24T left-side sprocket on wheel.

Only the 2nd chain from the 24T to the 14T on the jackshaft will move when rolling. Since the big 48T is a freewheel, the primary chain and C-clutch won't turn when pedaling or coasting. So the jackshaft and bearings will still turn, but it should be low friction.

The left-side 24T sprocket will NOT freewheel. This is done simply for strength and reliability. Staton does have a 16T freewheel, but I wanted to be sure that was one less part to break. Even if the freewheel is not on the wheel itself, I'm sure it will still make a big difference compared to no freewheel at all.
 

graucho

Active Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2008
Messages
1,741
Im keeping a eye on this thread. My next project will need a special drive with the 12in
rear wheel. I need the pedal and engine to pull from the same rear wheel sprocket through
a jackshaft set up. Ive dealt with jackshafts many times but always with a single power
source. (engine to jackshaft, jackshaft to rear sprocket) Now I will have the dual power
source.

It need to have the "engine drive side" shut down when im peddling. And vise-versa. My minds wheels are a turn'in.
 

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TWalker

Guest
I have the parts I just need to put it together. I have a hub with right and left freewheels I just need to lace it up and go.

But they sent me a 48 tooth sprocket and I need a 36 or 44 so as soon as the send me the right sprocket I will be good to go.

But I have a better concept of a totally freewheeling rack mount 4 stroke with shifter kit. It will take me a bit longer to get this one in place. Ive already ridden it but without shifting yet. I already know it works.
 
T

TWalker

Guest
I'm in the process of finishing a freewheeling bicycle. Just like you, I want the freedom to actually PEDAL the bike without turning a bunch of extra friction and weight, and also want the ability to coast further and save gas.
This is my goal, Ive got it down with a DAX Titan, I just need lace up the hub. But the Titan is heavy, I eventually want something that is so light and freewheels so well it can be ridden regularly as a bicycle without burden. A totally freewheeling Subaru Robin is probably the ideal because it weighs a 3rd less than the Honda/Titan.

I live where there is nothing but mountains and hills and I could coast for miles but need an assist up hills. I'm also a bicycler so I want to bicycle without even "knowing" Ive got an engine.
 

ZnsaneRyder

Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2008
Messages
808
That sounds good TWalker! Is your 48T (36 or 44) sprocket a freewheel, or are you using a different freewheel sprocket on your left side of the hub?

The idea of a shifter bike w/freewheel for the gas side drive is awesome.

Good luck with the build TWalker. It is always nice to see ideas become reality.
 
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5

5-7HEAVEN

Guest
My Staton rear chain drive on "The Iron Dragon" is freewheeling and has all the characteristics you outlined.

Its front engine is friction drive. However, I fabbed a lever to raise the engine for freewheeling front and rear engines while pedalling my bike.
 
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mlcorson

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Joined
Jul 25, 2008
Messages
246
Yes, Staton chain drive with Robin is what I have with free wheel hub. Meets all your specs.
-Mike
 
S

SirJakesus

Guest
Staton gear and chain drive is the closest thing I can think of that matches this criteria. The NuVinci setup doesn't totally apply since the chain going up to the gearbox does spin while pedaling. It's freewheeled so it doesn't add any noticeable drag. The drawback of the staton gear and chain drive is the weight of the gearbox. It's bulletproof but it certainly adds a lot of weight to the top of the bike and you will definitely feel the extra load while pedaling up hills. My best suggestion would be a friction drive. They're probably the lightest kits available and can be easily removed from the wheel or completely from the bike in about half an hour tops. Dimension edge has an engagement lever available to remove the roller "on the fly."
And just so you know, I was skeptical of friction drive before I jumped into them and now I'm totally hooked. It's the closest thing to a bicycle with 2hp of extra umph.
 
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