Are bike with more speeds better or with single speed?

The_Aleman

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Just throwing our some options. Your wrong about the NuVincies though. I have a 360 that has been running strong for 2 years now. Has plenty of power to it, climbs like a beast, and cruises at 30 with no strain on the engine at all.
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That's sweet! I think that's great you've made it work, and having intentionally limited overall output on my own set-up to save the drivetrain I can appreciate you making your N360 work. One knows how to ride what they got. You are the first non-electric guy I have heard of that has not messed-up the 6-ball Nuvinci system. Myself, I will take a Rohloff over any NuVinci, but $hee$sh. Taiwan-made Sturmeys do a decent job when adjusted dead-on balls.

As a fellow guy that might question how things how built, I bet it would be cool if you found a way to upgrade to 8-ball on that N360. The N171 did weigh like 3lbs more than the ~5.5lb N330-N380, but it handled a good deal more power because of the added balls (heh)
 


LR Jerry

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This part you said!By using a multi geared bike you can run a much larger rear sprocket than what comes with the kit. Meaning you'll get higher top end speeds. WTF are you talking about? I use a 7spd 11-34 free wheel and have for years,and with a 44t chain ring on the 11t I can't even get close to keeping up to or helping the engine after 1/4 throttle it's all no load fake peddaling.
You left out some information here.

Are you referring to a shift kit or a single ratio drive?

Is your bike a standard stock kit or performance modified?

Is your bike self propelled or do you have to pedal assist to get it moving?

If you're on 26" tires using a 44:11 ratio at a 90 cadence you'll no longer be contributing after 27.8 mph.

What I was talking about is a single ratio left side sprocket. With a standard stock 2 stroke kit one could switch out the stock rear sprocket and use a smaller rear left side sprocket using a multi geared bike to assist in take offs.
 
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gary55

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Nov 27, 2012
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That's sweet! I think that's great you've made it work, and having intentionally limited overall output on my own set-up to save the drivetrain I can appreciate you making your N360 work. One knows how to ride what they got. You are the first non-electric guy I have heard of that has not messed-up the 6-ball Nuvinci system. Myself, I will take a Rohloff over any NuVinci, but $hee$sh. Taiwan-made Sturmeys do a decent job when adjusted dead-on balls.

As a fellow guy that might question how things how built, I bet it would be cool if you found a way to upgrade to 8-ball on that N360. The N171 did weigh like 3lbs more than the ~5.5lb N330-N380, but it handled a good deal more power because of the added balls (heh)
Thank you sir. I eyeballed those Rohloffs hard but like you said $hee$sh. Took a chance with the NuVinci and so far so good. I have heard the 380s are even stronger. I do have another 360 in the wings that is going to replace a shimano nexus 4 speed. The 4 speed ain't bad, but it's a older hub with a roller brake that's not working all that great. I figure if I go through the time and money to replace the roller Murphy would probably trash the hub. That and I like the disc rear.
Also have a Strumey 5sp. behind a hs153. So far the 360 seems to work the best. Would love to have a 380, but I have found that I have a tendency to acquire more personal bikes than I really ride. I think that adding balls thing might be a little above my skill set. Balls.
 
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LR Jerry

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overall multispeed bikes are "more better" with or without a motor.
shift kits whole nother ballgame
This was my point that multi ratio bikes don't have to be complicated if you know how to shift to the next higher or lower ratio with the fewest moves and least resistance while eliminating redundant gearing.

A shifting system I've been teaching for years now on Yahoo Answers Cycling section is using a 3x11 drive system on a touring bike. My set up is Chainrings {22,36,50}; 11 speed cassette 34-11. It gets shifted like this: 1(1-6); 2(3-8); 3(6-11) for 18 non redundant ratios. Notice you're using 6 cogs per chainring 666. Starting gears are 1(1) and 2(3). Entering a steep climb at a slow speed or from a dead stop 1(1-6). Level ground comfort riding 2(3-8). Down hill or level ground sprinting 3(6-11).

In pedal only if a gear is too easy or to hard to maintain a 70-90 cadence then you're in the wrong gear. Therefore you need to shift to the next higher or lower ratio.
 

gary55

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This was my point that multi ratio bikes don't have to be complicated if you know how to shift to the next higher or lower ratio with the fewest moves and least resistance while eliminating redundant gearing.

A shifting system I've been teaching for years now on Yahoo Answers Cycling section is using a 3x11 drive system on a touring bike. My set up is Chainrings {22,36,50}; 11 speed cassette 34-11. It gets shifted like this: 1(1-6); 2(3-8); 3(6-11) for 18 non redundant ratios. Notice you're using 6 cogs per chainring 666. Starting gears are 1(1) and 2(3). Entering a steep climb at a slow speed or from a dead stop 1(1-6). Level ground comfort riding 2(3-8). Down hill or level ground sprinting 3(6-11).

In pedal only if a gear is too easy or to hard to maintain a 70-90 cadence then you're in the wrong gear. Therefore you need to shift to the next higher or lower ratio.
Never thought about it before. Not really in my scope of uses with internals, but makes sense though.
 

JerboaJohn

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yeah, , only use the redundant ratios on a situational basis.
but isn't 9-11 sprocket cassettes overboard? 3f x 9 r gives at least 12-15 useful combos, or a 2 x 8 with a 13-32 cassette even there's 10 good ratios,, does one need more on a casual basis?
 

gary55

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You left out some information here.

Are you referring to a shift kit or a single ratio drive?

Is your bike a standard stock kit or performance modified?

Is your bike self propelled or do you have to pedal assist to get it moving?

If you're on 26" tires using a 44:11 ratio at a 90 cadence you'll no longer be contributing after 27.8 mph.

What I was talking about is a single ratio left side sprocket. With a standard stock 2 stroke kit one could switch out the stock rear sprocket and use a larger rear left side sprocket using a multi geared bike to assist in take offs.
It kinda threw me too with the equating larger rear with higher top end. Now I get where you were trying to go with it.
 

LR Jerry

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yeah, , only use the redundant ratios on a situational basis.
but isn't 9-11 sprocket cassettes overboard? 3f x 9 r gives at least 12-15 useful combos, or a 2 x 8 with a 13-32 cassette even there's 10 good ratios,, does one need more on a casual basis?
Here's where the 9 and 11 cassette comes in useful using a double crank on road bikes. They should be shifted like this. 2x9: 1(1-6); 2(4-9). For 12 non redundant ratios. Use 1(1) and 1(4) as starting gears.

2x11: 1(1-7); 2(5-11) for 14 non redundant ratios. Use 1(1) and 1(4) as starting gears.

In pedal only you are the engine. Therefore the jumps between ratios have to be closer together. This is done so you can use gear selection and a varying cadence of 70-90 to control heart rate.

If at a 90 cadence your heart rate is below your desired amount then shift to the next higher ratio.

If at a 70 cadence your heart rate is above your desired amount then shift to the next lower ratio.

To use this system you need a bicycle computer with a heart rate monitor and cadence meter on it. You can get them off eBay for under $25.

By understanding cycling if you're in reasonably good shape you can use your gears efficiently to get you home if your engine quits.
 

Street Ryderz

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You left out some information here.

Are you referring to a shift kit or a single ratio drive?

Is your bike a standard stock kit or performance modified?

Is your bike self propelled or do you have to pedal assist to get it moving?

If you're on 26" tires using a 44:11 ratio at a 90 cadence you'll no longer be contributing after 27.8 mph.

What I was talking about is a single ratio left side sprocket. With a standard stock 2 stroke kit one could switch out the stock rear sprocket and use a larger rear left side sprocket using a multi geared bike to assist in take offs.
No shift kit, Left side single speed gear ratio being 11/30,Not a stock engine it doesn't really need pedal assist but I still do at first but yeah after 1/4 throttle pedaling adds nothing.A larger left side gear is slower topend and would over rev the engine from lack of load also makes any pedal input useless almost right out of the hole LOL.
 
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