Clutch Main Spring.

Nickt919

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Nick he said earlier that he could push the bucking bar in easy, I’ve never seen one that was that way.
If it goes in easy then something has to be off....not right.

I've used heat on the case around the bearing on the side it all comes out and heat on the shaft on the opposite side. It helps free it some when you push it out.
 

Axl Myk

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If it goes in easy then something has to be off....not right.

I've used heat on the case around the bearing on the side it all comes out and heat on the shaft on the opposite side. It helps free it some when you push it out.
Yep. You can take the shaft out of the clutch side. It pushes right out. Not too much heat. You don't want to melt a seal.
Is it possible OP has the clutch cable post screwed in too much?
 

Greg58

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I’ve heard of people taking the shaft out without splitting the cases, since I have no first hand knowledge I didn’t want to suggest it.
 

ImpulseRocket89

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I’ve heard of people taking the shaft out without splitting the cases, since I have no first hand knowledge I didn’t want to suggest it.
Take the sprocket off and remove the key. I disassemble the clutch first but you can do it after. Tap out with a deadblow hammer or other rubber or nylon mallet from the sprocket side.
 

Nickt919

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If you beat it out it would be advisable to have a new clutch shaft on hand and new bearings wouldn’t be a bad idea.
The Chinese metal is soft. It’s very easy to booger up the threads on either end.
 

weefek

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Take the sprocket off and remove the key. I disassemble the clutch first but you can do it after. Tap out with a deadblow hammer or other rubber or nylon mallet from the sprocket side.
If you beat it out it would be advisable to have a new clutch shaft on hand and new bearings wouldn’t be a bad idea.
The Chinese metal is soft. It’s very easy to booger up the threads on either end.
It's fairly easy to remove without messing up the threads. Like @ImpulseRocket89 said use a rubber or nylon hammer, or use a piece of wood between a normal hammer and the clutch shaft (I'd recommend hitting it on the chain gear side). I'd check the bearings first before replacing them. I've fallen unlucky and have had factory bearings be bad, but they might be fine. Run them with your fingers and it's easy to tell if they're good or not.

Depending on what you find you most likely need some new parts but it totally depends on what you find once you get the clutch shaft out.
 

ImpulseRocket89

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If you beat it out it would be advisable to have a new clutch shaft on hand and new bearings wouldn’t be a bad idea.
The Chinese metal is soft. It’s very easy to booger up the threads on either end.
Honestly I would just have a new one on order anyway. At best you have a backup for later and at worst you only spent a few bucks.

I used a nylon hammer when I tapped mine out. The Chinesium may be soft but you would have to REALLY try to damage the threads with a nylon hammer. I may not be Thor Odinson but I hit mine pretty darn hard lol.
 

Chainlube

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Honestly I would just have a new one on order anyway. At best you have a backup for later and at worst you only spent a few bucks.

I used a nylon hammer when I tapped mine out. The Chinesium may be soft but you would have to REALLY try to damage the threads with a nylon hammer. I may not be Thor Odinson but I hit mine pretty darn hard lol.
I've bashed on some :poop: pretty hard myself to get them apart, and thought at the time, this is never going back together.
 

Nickt919

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I’ve done it twice…knocking it out to remove the clutch shaft.

The bearings are pressed in to the case halves. Those press fits are what holds the entire assembly in place.
I must have been unlucky in that the bearings were a super tight press fit.

The first time I followed a YT video by Smolik Performance and made a tool to fit in the clutch shaft. The tool was ground from a piece of rebar, which is fairly soft steel. It took a hit a little harder than a tap.
I had to hit it so hard I warped the end of the tube shaft.

The second time I used heat in precise areas and the shaft came out much easier. This was on 2 different engines.. not removal 2X’s from the same engine.

I had tried a hard rubber mallet. No go with it. I also tried a wood block between the shaft and hammer. If there’s a next time, I’ll give a nylon hammer a try.

Regardless how it’s knocked out, I’m not comfortable with the cross type hit the bearings gets in this process. The balls can get deformed from this type blow.

What makes this method of removal so attractive is a hammer smack is used instead of pulling the engine off the bike and completely disassembling it, splitting the cases.
 
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