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cost [ bikes - engines - pricerange ]

J

japat100

Guest
some members say the cost of improved bolts and nuts ,,gaskets ,instructions would increase cost , it would cost you less ,,go run around town ,,thats if you live near a town in a car,,,,,remember bike not running yet" with these gas prices and look for extras, and keep track ,,so far i am guesting it cost me 60 or 70 dollars ..and it might have cost me another $5.00 if it came with the kit ,,,,,,and if i did not come across this forum it might have cost me my motor ..i was not told about this forum by the seller and only came across it by accident ,,so how many people that bought kits never head yet about this forum 90 percent ,,you would think sellers could at least pass on that information,,, some members may say just do a web search ,,well i did and ended up joining another forum that was suppose to help me with these kits ,,all they wanted to talk about is meeting biker chicks ,and pic of young girls half nude laying across bicycle ,, what the hell has that got to do with nuts and bolts , and bicycle kits ,,i am not going to live long enough to figure out women ,,but might live long enought to figure out these bicycle kits ,
to put together instructions and tips and what not to do etc. on one page for beginners would be a great help ,,but we must also find away to let the other 90 percent know about this forum ,, because at one time we were all part of the 90 percent
japat100

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J

just for kicks

Guest
I dont think the small hardware and stuff would increase the cost to much but I'd like to see better castings with better fit/finish which would drive up the cost a bit.

I didnt need any other parts from the kit side of things to get going but my bike was in rough shape needing grease, tires, and pedals.

I'd like to see a carb with a bit more adjustment.
I'd like a nice looking well finished engine that has modded parts available for it.(like this http://www.pocketbikesunlimited.com/images/hornet-50cc.jpg)))
I'd like to have a better more adapable engine mounting setup.
I'd like to see a well tuned exhuast pipe for the engine and more styles.
I'd like a rear hub set up for the spocket with a good solid working brake(disc/drum IDC).
I'd like a combination right hand brake lever/twist throttle/kill switch with matching left hand clutch lever/light switch/accessary switches With remote lever for choke.

It appears to me that everything you could want in one of these is already out there just not in one package yet.

Obviously the kits could be better but it would price it way out of reach and we'd be less inclined to mod and tweak it than we are now.
I, like most everyone else is looking at whats out there and something will pop up sooner or later.
 

bamabikeguy

Active Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
1,929
Kit costs appear to go in $100 increments.

Lowest is an e-bay "bargain", to deal with a reputable engine supplier with a telephone and business license, is a $100 jump, but to take a "bargain" and upgrade it "on your own" is also $50-100.

Mid level and high level prices make for higher expectation of customer service.

However, to start off on the right path, every bike needs a $75-150 upgrade in wheels and tires.

12 gauge steel wheels start at $40, and you'll spend $80 for aluminum.

Tires may need replacing, minimum for 2 new stock Pyramids is $25.

And the slime tube/Mr. Tuffy combo runs about $15 per tire.

So, if a person comes on the forum, and slaps the best engine on a crappy bike, problems from the bike might transfer to the kit (frame cracks, misaligned/weak spokes), with a snowball effect on the psyche of the rider.

A breakdown on the road makes for a sour mood after lugging the bike home, and then the sour mood makes a person hasty, overlooking a key repair or losing an all important washer.

All's MB.com can do is keep getting more recommends, rise higher in the search engines.

Your help in not only getting the word out about us, then helping get new members to read up BEFORE slapping a kit on a peice of junk bike is greatly appreciated, especially by the most satisfied riders.
 
J

just for kicks

Guest
I know the bike I'm using is sub-par for sure but I just have to watch it more closely and enjoy it the way it is for now.I did replace my dry rotted tires and lubed up the axle bearings and got the brakes working good.Those were all important things to me but might be overlooked by someone who is just to excited to get motoring.
I only really want/need right now to have better more combined controls to make a neater install and easier to use motoredbike.

I'm still looking for a heavy duty bike to use and I have seen a few I like but I'll run it the way it is for now and maybe next year pop for the bike I want.
Some other people might expect to slap a motor on their old bike and end up with a high-end motorcycle, those are the people that will have the most difficult time with these.

The first thing people need to know about these engine kits should be the basic minimum bicycle requirements for safe motorbiking.
 
I

iron_monkey

Guest
I speculate one may not need to upgrade the wheel if one buys a pullstart/centirfugal clutch kit and does usual commuting.

The stresses on the spokes is great when trying to pedal start the engine, as the wheel faces an enoumous change in load.

I need to stand on the easiest gear to give enough torque to overcome this load; even the steepest hills in my area dont require anywhere near this much initial effort on a normal pushbike. So imo the biggest load on the wheel would be during pedal starting.
 

bamabikeguy

Active Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
1,929
Well, GEBE's use pull starts and the clutch, but it is now getting to be "recommended preparation" for anything better than 16 gauge, either GEBE's 14 gauge or some variety of 12 gauge.

Workman's 10 g is overkill.

I'm about to ride around the area looking at three used bikes in the classified ads to add to the stable. I need a wide clearance on the back, for the spokering to clear, but if a person looks for the widest tires, 9 times out of 10 the Happy Time would probably fit in the frame.

I'd even say 1.75" is the mimimum advisable size, better 2-2.125" if you want to reach the speeds, distances and reliability sucessful riders are enjoying.

Upgrading the wheels and tires is an investment in "Peace of Mind".
 
M

MotorbikeMike

Guest
wheels

I have built many bikes. The minumum wheel I use is steel 105 spoked. I have used some alloys, but do not like what I've seen when they have been crashed.

My wheel of choice, the virtually indistructable Worksman spoked with 120's and a rolled rim, this wheel rocks! I use the Shimano coaster rears.

Mike
 
M

mickal1025

Guest
mine are .078 and look to be holding up. this is 14 gage? I was worried after all the chatter about spoke size. I've got 197 miles on my bike now. how long before I know for sure?
 
J

JosephGarcia

Guest
bamabikeguy said:
However, to start off on the right path, every bike needs a $75-150 upgrade in wheels and tires.

12 gauge steel wheels start at $40, and you'll spend $80 for aluminum.

Tires may need replacing, minimum for 2 new stock Pyramids is $25.

And the slime tube/Mr. Tuffy combo runs about $15 per tire.
Personally I got 2 new 12 guage wheels for 30$ total, both cruiser white wall tires for 18$ and two slime tubes (which never failed yet) for 12$ Comes up to around 60$
 
R

rcjunkie

Guest
I use whatever spokes come with the cheap 20 year old Huffy's that I dig out of junk piles in people's backyards. No problem what so ever.
 
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