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Emergency Guide: issue 48 [Spring Tensioner]

DuctTapedGoat

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,007
So I am riding along and broke down.

30 seconds away from home... Yet I don't care if I have all my at home backup parts, I'm repairing with a roadside kit - going to my destination 5 miles away and making it back before dinner, and so I can do out issue 48 of my Guidebook, Duct Taped Goats Guide To Emergency Motorbike Maintenance.

Essentially: The spring chain tensioner (aluminum) has been aeten by the bike. Initially, it ate the sprocket, covering the rear in shiny aluminum pieces amidst the residue of oils. I replace the nylon wheel to it and 500 miles passes by, the spring breaking around 480 miles, which is why I bought two heavy duty aftermarket springs due to my bike eating all the flexback from the stock aftermarket spring.

The hinge failed day one and day one I made the decision for a future of at least 74 days of riding to remove the hinge, throw a generic two nut one bolt in it and watch it saw off of there and today that did happen, the hinge failed and I am on the road with access to 2 Hose Clamps. The two clamps acting as a tube around the seatstay and the spring where it's drilled to lock the seat down doubles the amount of intended pressure of spring power, but it is what I have available on the road. Symptoms now are LOTS of Drag, and I have the Fear it's Gonna Break every second while it's absolutely fine. new tensioner is on the way, however this repair might be Broken In by the time the replacement spring tensioner arrives. However there is so much drag - it is tougher to pedal, there's no way just a few more Springs and Hose Clamps would be reliable. I am certainly in suggestion that we have a product that puts our spring tension into the seatstay post, this fits almost naturally where a Ghost Sprocket could be Housed.

Photos are in the next post or edit here
 


zippinaround

Active Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2013
Messages
724
I would not drive it like that! The chain is rubbing off of itself , there is good reason the tensioner is put back where it is , but you could use that if you had another tensioner back where it normally is don't really see the point tho .

I have two tensioner on mine but the one on the seat post is on the top to stop chain jump .
 

DuctTapedGoat

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,007
I would not drive it like that! The chain is rubbing off of itself , there is good reason the tensioner is put back where it is , but you could use that if you had another tensioner back where it normally is don't really see the point tho .

I have two tensioner on mine but the one on the seat post is on the top to stop chain jump .
The chain has been rubbing for over 700 miles.

First - the stock tensioner is junk, it needs to be drilled into place and even then it isn't great.

Second - wtf, this is a spring tensioner thread, where the tensioner is attached to the engine. f*** that stock sh*t, it's a dangerous piece of junk.

My build is somehow lopsided, the chain is tight then loose for no apparent reason, new engine new sprocket AND new chain same issue. I can't remove more links without it not reaching and I can't use the stock one because it needs a variating amount of pressure. So it's got a springer tensioner, of which the arm PHYSICALLY BROKE INTO TWO PIECES AND HAD TO BE REPAIRED ON THE ROAD (the topic and context of the thread). Reply to that with an on the road fix, because I fixed it with 2 Hose Clamps in about 10 minutes and wasn't late for dinner.

There's a reason for why I use words and take pictures, context. Check the topic, SPRING TENSIONER. Save the stock talk for your mama, this is real life sh*t. I put 25 miles on my ride daily and document the emergency repairs.
 

Street Ryderz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2016
Messages
3,669
On that bike you dont even need a tensioner there is nothing in the way and if your chain goes slack then tight means your sproket is not concentricly mounted or the cut is off etheir way not good!Also if your having to do repairs to the same area's maybe a differrent solution is needded!
 

CrazyDan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2016
Messages
3,009
Sounds like your sprocket isn't centered on your wheel. That'll cause the tight-loose-tight symptom in your chain.
 

DuctTapedGoat

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,007
I posted photos for a reason. What kind of rear sprocket do I have? That's a hub adapter sprocket mount, AKA Clamshell Adapter, it's not incorrect.

Also, as I have mentioned, I have replaced the chain, the engine and the sprocket and there is still a loose/tight chain fitting.

Lastly, I've put over 1000 miles on this bike, this isn't a 'repairs on the same thing' issue. The solutions I make have either lasted WEEKS of daily riding, or they don't last 1 mile.

There is a topic to the thread - BROKEN SPRING TENSIONER. The chain rubbing the chain isn't an issue, after 6 months, 700+ miles and plenty of other sh*t going on I am sick of people's empty opinion about my chain. The chain is in great shape with zero signs of wear. You wanna talk about putting distance between the chains tell me which size Ghost Sprocket should go there to prevent it from traveling up or down the chain based on my drive and driven sprockets' teeth and amount of links, and/or halflinks - all opinions otherwise are a waste of time.

If you don't have a spring tensioner with the same error, this thread wasn't made for you. This thread is designed for people who are stranded with a broken tensioner at midnight and limited roadside tools to make it home, not for a critique on how tight that chain is. I don't do show bikes, I build reliable bikes that can burn a full tank every day with limited issues as possible.

There's 50 pounds of pressure in that spring, if I really cared about any drag reduction I would have fixed it with my plethora of replacement parts and tools - instead I rigged it last minute on the road with limited parts and tools and have put 30 miles on this repair so far. What matters is having it solved in the meantime while I wait for a new tensioner in the mail.

I'll put some pics of the destroyed tensioner next to a brand new one sometime next week so you can understand what the context and topic is, what it means to put hundreds of miles through this aftermarket part until it breaks repeatedly and still operates after emergency repairs.

Spring Tensioner - some constant resistance is GOOD, allowing it to be firmly tight with a spring and 1cm of breathing room is optimally recommended, however there should be zero play in the chain before the spring engages though. Correct alignment is more important.

Resistance affects the top and bottom of the chain differently, one is tightening and one is loosening. The BOTTOM of the chain should be as tight as the top of the chain when the engine is engaged, it should always be under a spring tension for when the chain stretches it will automatically adjust and correct the tautness of the looser bottom chain as the engine lets it go.
 

DuctTapedGoat

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,007
Sounds like your sprocket isn't centered on your wheel. That'll cause the tight-loose-tight symptom in your chain.
Wrong. Read the original post - replaced the engine, chain and rear sprocket. Reference the photo - that's a CNC Clamshell Adapter, nothing is crooked.
 

DuctTapedGoat

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2010
Messages
1,007
On that bike you dont even need a tensioner there is nothing in the way and if your chain goes slack then tight means your sproket is not concentricly mounted or the cut is off etheir way not good!Also if your having to do repairs to the same area's maybe a differrent solution is needded!
Incorrect. I won't build a bike without a spring tensioner - the chain as it is tightened on the upper half it is LOOSENED on the bottom half. The spring collects the slack created, with tension.

I'm not gonna change the position of my motor every time the chain stretches just because you think it doesn't need a tensioner. Break your own things.

Based on where my engine is and how many teeth are on the sprocket, that is how many links are necessary to fit a master link and connect it, it leaves that much slack because of the small diameter on the rear sprocket.
 

zippinaround

Active Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2013
Messages
724
your bike eating your sprocket , things snapping breaking off etc . this isnt normal so there is a problem if your chain has been rubbing like that for 700miles i'd get ready for it to snap very soon.

have you ever seen a real motorbike? notice that they dont force the chain into itself its for good reason , denying that something is wrong is only costing you i couldnt give a flying tupence.

also i've used the stock tensioner for over 1000 miles with no problem , i understand this is an emergency fix for spring tensioner its still dangerous and just bad advice IMO.
 
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