Engine won't turn over after clutch adjustment *Update 09/05*

ImpulseRocket89

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The P just means projected electrode. Thr R means it has a 5k ohm resistor.

Plugs can have both, neither, or either. I run a bpmr7a plug, for example. You could run a BPR6HS. The only thing a projected electrode does is move the electrode tip out further a couple of MM out of the gas pocket to expose it to the fuel charge more. This makes the plug act slightly hotter than standard, so if you want to use a Projected electrode it may be a good idea for you to drop a heat range to a BPR7HS, which is what I basically run.

In my experience most cdi ignitions have a more consistent and stable spark when using a resistor plug or cap. Also quite handy if you have a radio lol.
 

Emcee

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The P just means projected electrode. Thr R means it has a 5k ohm resistor.

Plugs can have both, neither, or either. I run a bpmr7a plug, for example. You could run a BPR6HS. The only thing a projected electrode does is move the electrode tip out further a couple of MM out of the gas pocket to expose it to the fuel charge more. This makes the plug act slightly hotter than standard, so if you want to use a Projected electrode it may be a good idea for you to drop a heat range to a BPR7HS, which is what I basically run.

In my experience most cdi ignitions have a more consistent and stable spark when using a resistor plug or cap. Also quite handy if you have a radio lol.
So a 7 is less hot than a 6? And resistor plugs run hotter than projected electrode plugs which is why you would use a 7 instead of a 6? Hopefully I understood this correctly.

I'm going to mess with the clutch tomorrow. I'm studying videos on understanding everything about how the clutch works.

Now, with a BPR having an extended electrode, that doesn't change the length dimensions of the plug? I only ask because my head is leaking a tiny bit of fuel out of the spark plug hole. Originally I would just tighten it down but it's to a point where I think I'm just going to damage threads and further the problem. I took the head off of another Ridgeyard engine and for some reason a sharp metal noise can be heard when I roll the bike. When you pull the clutch lever in, the piston isn't moving so I'm unsure how a cylinder head would create a sharp metal scraping noise. When I put the original head on, the noise goes away

I ask about the sharp noise because assuming the piston doesn't move when you pull the clutch lever, I wasn't sure if the plug is somehow longer and is hitting the piston (assuming the piston doesn't move when you engage the clutch
 

ImpulseRocket89

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So a 7 is less hot than a 6? And resistor plugs run hotter than projected electrode plugs which is why you would use a 7 instead of a 6? Hopefully I understood this correctly.

I'm going to mess with the clutch tomorrow. I'm studying videos on understanding everything about how the clutch works.

Now, with a BPR having an extended electrode, that doesn't change the length dimensions of the plug? I only ask because my head is leaking a tiny bit of fuel out of the spark plug hole. Originally I would just tighten it down but it's to a point where I think I'm just going to damage threads and further the problem. I took the head off of another Ridgeyard engine and for some reason a sharp metal noise can be heard when I roll the bike. When you pull the clutch lever in, the piston isn't moving so I'm unsure how a cylinder head would create a sharp metal scraping noise. When I put the original head on, the noise goes away

I ask about the sharp noise because assuming the piston doesn't move when you pull the clutch lever, I wasn't sure if the plug is somehow longer and is hitting the piston (assuming the piston doesn't move when you engage the clutch
Yes, in NGK plugs the higher the number , the colder the plug.

No, a resistor is not hotter. Read what I said again. A projected electrode can act hotter than a standard plug of the same heat range. Resistors have nothing to do with heat range.
 

Chainlube

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Does the nut on top of the clutch arm play at importance? In regards to tightening or loosening?
Not really, but the screw on the end does. If you notice a lot of kinks in the end of the cable, then it's been slipping. Of course the only cure is to tighten it more, then the little screw will strip or break the arm. It's better to get a barrel clamp and put it out side the arm and throw the screw away.
 

Chainlube

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Not really, but the screw on the end does. If you notice a lot of kinks in the end of the cable, then it's been slipping. Of course the only cure is to tighten it more, then the little screw will strip or break the arm. It's better to get a barrel clamp and put it out side the arm and throw the screw away.
I shouldn't say not really, but if the arm isn't coming back straight or a little to the left side then it will have to repositioned.
 

Emcee

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*Update 09/05*



I went back to the drawing board. The clutch adjustment was poor timing because when I adjusted it so it ran I still had a hard time. The JRL carb was the problem. I put the stock NT back on and it ran like a dream. Don't know why or how but this has been driving me nuts for two straight weeks. It would sputter and I would have to pedal for 30 yards as it acted like it wanted to start and eventually turn over. She fires right up now.
 
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