Friction Drives - Staton, Inc.



chrisnbush

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
135
Hey -

From above, wondering if cinder / gravel type surfaces increase rate of wear on tire rollers ?

I have a tire roller unit on a bike, and have used it on some dirt roads, old railroad beds. The roller is getting smooth, and I would be suprised if I had 500 miles on the bike.

Thinking maybe the cinder coming up on a "wetter" tire might be grinding away at the roller ? I am thinking of those kits you get for rock polishing, where they supply you with grit (which is probably just sand).

I got the tire roller unit from livefast - are some rollers harder than others ?

Thanks

cb
 
A

Alaskavan

Guest
Here, where I live, there's a lot of fine grit dust. I can polish down a roller right quick. I think you're right about a wet tire grinding it down faster. As for how hard they are, I don't know if there are different hardnesses among the steel ones. Working a smooth one over with a dremel (or an angle grinder) will extend their useful life.
 

chrisnbush

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
135
Nice pic Moondog

Now that is functional. Step thru frame, and cargo - jump on it and go. No chinese bicycle carp to break. How have rollers held up for you ? Where did you get the kit from ?

Thanks again

BigKid
 

Silvaire

Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2008
Messages
147
Years ago I had a business associate who owned and raced two dirt track sprint cars, and I sometimes had the privilege of hanging with his pit crew during the races.

The method used to drive the external accessories on the engines was by toothed timing belts (Gilmer belts, we called them back then) and aluminum pulleys.

One drive component wore out fairly quickly, but the other drive component lasted so well and has so little wear to it that it could be reused again with no problem.

Which do you think it was that wore out - the pulleys or the belt?

Rubber and dirt and metal can do things that seem strange until you understand what it is that's actually happening.
 

moondog

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Messages
191
Now that is functional. Step thru frame, and cargo - jump on it and go. No chinese bicycle carp to break. How have rollers held up for you ? Where did you get the kit from ?

Thanks again

BigKid
Thanks, It's a 78 Roadmaster.

Still on my first roller and it shows no wear. It's got a thick moped tire and it shows very little wear.

I pedal when I take off and the small motor is not putting much wear on the tire or roller.
 

moondog

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2008
Messages
191
Years ago I had a business associate who owned and raced two dirt track sprint cars, and I sometimes had the privilege of hanging with his pit crew during the races.

The method used to drive the external accessories on the engines was by toothed timing belts (Gilmer belts, we called them back then) and aluminum pulleys.

One drive component wore out fairly quickly, but the other drive component lasted so well and has so little wear to it that it could be reused again with no problem.

Which do you think it was that wore out - the pulleys or the belt?

Rubber and dirt and metal can do things that seem strange until you understand what it is that's actually happening.
I remember aftermarket aluminum pulleys on vw bugs wearing out.


Guess, the pulleys ?
 
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