Fuel Lead Substitute, Zinc Plus with ZDDP



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#2
Really not necessary on an engine built since about 1980. And even then, valve seat recession isn't much of a problem on small engines, the valve springs just aren't that strong.

I will occasionally burn some race fuel just for the smell, though.
 
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Nov 14, 2018
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#3
Really not necessary on an engine built since about 1980. And even then, valve seat recession isn't much of a problem on small engines, the valve springs just aren't that strong.
I will occasionally burn some race fuel just for the smell, though.
Howzit Busted Hotness,
Thanks for the Input.
Exhaust Valve Seat Recession (VSR) in Cast iron. (Whizzer)
True the valve springs on a Whizzer aren't that strong.
Small engines with cast iron valve seats usually run at 3,500 RPMs or below. They don't have this problem and can burn unleaded fuels.
Cast Iron Cylinder Whizzers run between 4,000 and 7,500 RPM and will get VSR from burning unleaded fuels.
Cast iron whizzers are high RPMs and high heat. The perfect combo for VSR.
I run a Westman NE Cast Iron Cylinder.
Yea, it got Exhaust Valve Seat Recession. VSR
I started to notice VSR after many many miles. 18,000 miles
It ruined the exhaust valve and I had to cut a new valve seat.
Now I add Lead Substitute to my unleaded fuel. This stopped the VSR.
This is why I recommend to use a Lead substitute in your Whizzer if it has cast iron valve seats.
It can't do no harm. It's only good + it has additives (chemicals) to help keep the valve train clean + cleans the carb.

Ya see its not the valve being jack hammered into the valve seat from the spring being too strong.
It's the valve sticking (welding) to the valve seat and removing small (Micro) amounts of metal from the valve seat.
The valve turns with normal engine vibration.
The Micro amounts of metal are grinded into the valve seat.
Then the micro amounts of metal are burned and go out the exhaust.
Giving the illusion that the valve is jack hammering itself into the valve seat.
The Lead in Leaded Gas or a Lead Substitute coats the valve seat with a thin layer of Lead. This prevents the cast iron valve seat from Micro Welding itself to the valve. VSR

That's why in the 70s car owners with cast iron valve seats fixed their cars by replacing the exhaust valve seat with Hardened stainless steel valve seats. Auto Shops made a small fortune.
The ones that did not. Just used a Lead Substitute and their cars ran just fine.
Most cars never had a problem with VSR because many years of burning Reg Leaded Gas built up a protective layer of Lead on their cast iron valve seats and no VSR
The ones who got a fresh valve job removed the protective layer of Lead and they suffered from VSR.
Most who are not sure if their old car has had a valve job done since the early 1970s use a Lead Substitute. Just to be SAFE.
They say you can run your old car on unleaded gas but to keep the RPMs down.

ALOHA Wrench
 
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