hello!

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Bigfoot

Guest
Hi :D

I don't have a motorized bike yet :cry:

It seems like a perfect transportation solution for me.I don't have a drivers license, or a vehicle (I'm 31 BTW), & pedal power can only take me so far! :(

For awhile now, I've been thinking of somehow putting a 4-stroke engine into a modified (for off-road)cruiser style bike.I'd rather use a 4-stroke because it's much less polluting, & is somewhat quieter as well, appently.I could be wrong though, because I don't know much about it really.I'll consider a 2-stroke if they're not too bad noise & pollution-wise.

I'm also seriously considering getting my motorcycle license, but these motored bikes are a great idea :D

I'm mainly looking for something reliable to explore local, & not so local trails & mountain roads.I know absolutely nothing about mechanics, or engines, but I figure it might be an interesting project, & an opportunity to learn something new.

I just stumbled onto this forum a few minutes ago- lots of inspiration here! :eek: :cool:

Any ideas about kits available, or design methods/ideas for a powerful off-road cruiser bike (is this possible?) would be appreciated.There are lots of hills/mountains where I live, & not so many cops...this is good :devilish: .
 


S

SchwinnAlloySeven_GT5

Guest
Welcome to the forum! I'm the same age as you, built my motor-assisted cruiser because pedaling on the plains can be a drag, what with the wind and all! I don't have much for hills here in East North Dakota, tho.

IMHO, a Dax 2-stroke would serve you well. A 2-stroke with modern oil is less-polluting than a diesel, and not too much louder than a 4-stroke. They are easy to install, for the most part, but some cruiser frames might require a bit of "finesse-ing" to get the front mount in an ideal position.

If you aren't looking for sustained speeds over 45KM/h, the stock 44T sprocket should be fine while still having good hill-climbing ability. If you need even more hill-climbing power, a 48T sprocket might be better.
 
B

Bigfoot

Guest
Hi SchwinnAlloySeven_GT5 :D

The Dax 70cc would be a good candidate for the engine-probably w/the 48T sprocket-the more power I can get, the better.Is there a trade off when it comes to torque vs. raw speed:? I'm also wondering if there's any part upgrades I might want to think about, for added performance,noise reduction,vibration reduction,etc.

As for the frame, I'm not really set on anything in particular-something w/some nice curves would be good.I'm just kinda looking for the engine+bicycle to "blend" together nicely.I'm also thinking about the fact that I don't know much about how to customize frames to fit an engine, so any frame that can fit perfectly w/the Dax w/out much messing around would be good as well.

There's a company in Canada that sells Skyhawk engines [edit-I just noticed you avatar :) ] similar to the Dax-they're a little more pricey, although they do have an 80cc version of a 2-stroke engine, so it might just be a price-power tradeoff.I'll post the link in my next post, due to the link thing rule.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Big, unless something has changed, the 80cc kits are really 70cc kits, which are 67 point something cc kits. Dax kits are highly recommended.

Not a lot of things you can do to these engines for "more power" other than to open up the exhaust a little and fit a better carb (which BTW is the only Skyhawk "upgrade" other than the air filter I see that's really an upgrade.

These engines do make about 4 times the power of a human, which is what powers most bicycles, so you have a huge power advantage over most "regular" bikes.

The 48T sprocket will drop your speed and fuel efficiency a little but give you more acceleration and hill climbing ability. Things get pretty hairy on a bike at 35 mph anyhow......
 
B

Bigfoot

Guest
Bikeguy Joe said:
Big, unless something has changed, the 80cc kits are really 70cc kits, which are 67 point something cc kits. Dax kits are highly recommended.

Not a lot of things you can do to these engines for "more power" other than to open up the exhaust a little and fit a better carb (which BTW is the only Skyhawk "upgrade" other than the air filter I see that's really an upgrade.

These engines do make about 4 times the power of a human, which is what powers most bicycles, so you have a huge power advantage over most "regular" bikes.

The 48T sprocket will drop your speed and fuel efficiency a little but give you more acceleration and hill climbing ability. Things get pretty hairy on a bike at 35 mph anyhow......
Thanks for the info! I'm a real newbe when it comes to this stuff, but I gotta start somewhere I guess.I could always experiment w/both sprockets, although I need to take into account the fact that I'm only 140lbs-so the 44T sprocket might work just fine. :???:

[edit]I just read that Bird used a 36 sprocket, & it added about 20mph :eek:

He was doing 38 uphill! :D

I also just noticed that Dax only ships to the U.S. .I might have to go w/Skyhawk, which is ok.
 

azbill

Active Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2006
Messages
3,721
I went up same mountain as bird, my bike probably weighs twice as much, but I have a 48 toother...
never pedaled once and I was only 10-15 mins behind (over a 24 mile course), while they where pedaling their behinds off !!! :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:
 
B

Bigfoot

Guest
azkronic said:
I went up same mountain as bird, my bike probably weighs twice as much, but I have a 48 toother...
never pedaled once and I was only 10-15 mins behind (over a 24 mile course), while they where pedaling their behinds off !!! :LOL: :LOL: :LOL:

:LOL: I think I'll stick w/the 48! :eek:
 
B

Bigfoot

Guest
locoWelder said:
Welcome to the forum!
Thank you-I'm DYING to get out into those hills!

I'll probably go w/a new Schwinn cruiser for the frame.Engine-wise, I'll have to see who ships to Canada, or stick w/the SkyhawkCanada website.
 
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