How to clean carbon?

Joined
Jun 29, 2017
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#1
Hello all,

My 66cc engine has about 600 miles on it. I opened it up today and it looked like this. How bad is this for the engine and how should I clean it? It's on the leanest needle setting do I need a smaller jet?
20180909_130849.jpg
 


crassius

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Jul 23, 2012
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#2
looks like maybe too much oil in your mix, I like to use 32:1 - if so, running better mix may clean that a bit

if your mix is right, then you probably are running too rich - make sure choke isn't stuck on a bit and if not, then you can try a smaller jet

if you get it running right, it may clean itself quite a bit
 

Joined
Apr 9, 2018
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#3
You could chuck up a wire wheel in a drill and put the motor at TDC and clean the crown off. If you don't have that spray some carb cleaner and use steel wool. What oil ratio do you use or do you just guess.
 


crassius

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#5
sounds right, you could lower float level to see if plug gets lighter, and if so, then look for a jet
 


Frankenstein

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Jun 24, 2016
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#7
I wouldn't bother cleaning it it's only carbon and in these motors you'll cook the chrome off before the carbon gets to a point where it will interfere. I would focus on the exhaust port and muffler if it's bad as those are where carbon buildup will make a significant difference in performance if anything. Also check the plug for crap, and maybe even up the heat rating if you make plenty of small trips (before the engine has time to come to temp basically) which will cause excessive buildup too.
 

FNTPuck

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Jul 2, 2018
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#8
As Spare_Parts said, if you use a scotch brite pad make sure the motor is not together. They throw tiny abrasive aluminum oxide particles through the engine that would totally wreck the bearings. I would prefer aluminum scouring pads for cleaning expensive pots and pans since it is softer than both copper and steel so has less of a chance of causing damage.

Even better would be to take Frankenstein's advice and just leave it alone...carbon isn't as big a deal on a 2stroke without any valves and lifters to worry about. If it really bugs you, some B12 or seafoam soaking on the piston top for a while before rubbing it with a rag will get most of it off without causing any damage to anything else or leaving any possibly harmful debris.
 






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