Is the pull start on most 4 stroke kits a weak point?

markjs

Well-Known Member
Local time
11:34 AM
Joined
Jul 31, 2023
Messages
293
Location
Port Townsend, WA, USA
I personally am more of a fan of 2 strokes, because to me, mixing oil is less trouble than a maintenance schedule that involves changing oil on a schedule.

The reason I ask is there are a few folks around my town running motorized bicycles. Most are two strokes like mine but every 4 stroke I have seen around involves a broken pull start. The one guy I talked to just carries the rope around and winds it around every time he needs to start it. That makes me think they're probably not much, if any better than the notoriously unreliable two stroke pull starts?

Just curious anyway. Eventually I want to try a 4 stroke build, just so I can say I've done it, see what it's like, then give the bike away or sell it later.
 
I personally am more of a fan of 2 strokes, because to me, mixing oil is less trouble than a maintenance schedule that involves changing oil on a schedule.

The reason I ask is there are a few folks around my town running motorized bicycles. Most are two strokes like mine but every 4 stroke I have seen around involves a broken pull start. The one guy I talked to just carries the rope around and winds it around every time he needs to start it. That makes me think they're probably not much, if any better than the notoriously unreliable two stroke pull starts?

Just curious anyway. Eventually I want to try a 4 stroke build, just so I can say I've done it, see what it's like, then give the bike away or sell it later.
Old school mini bikes were rope starters. Put the rope in your pocket after it starts.
 
Anything made out of plastic can break, especially pull starts. If you pull on it till it engages and just a firm pull I've never had one break on me. If you rip on it from the rest position that will break it, or HE man it with too much force.
 
There's an old 4 stroke starting trick. Pull lightly till you feel resistance; then pull through with just enough pressure to were you're past the resistance. I like to do this a couple of times. Due to the couple of light pre-pulls gas is now in the cylinder. Then pull to the resistance point again this is the start of the compression stroke allow the coil spring to pull the cord back in. Follow up with a moderate pull pressure and it should crank. All a primer bulb is doing is putting gas in to the carburetor.

My cord is 14 years old and never been replaced. On my lawn equipment the only time I've replaced cords is when I bought the lawn equipment used.

Doing things like using a 100% gas and knowing good pull cord techniques will greatly increase the life of the starter.
 
The main reason pull chords bust is pulling them all the way to the limit. That pust stress on all the components envolved and can brake any one of them. Do what Sidewinder Jerry suggested and pull it to the top of the compression stroke, but don't pull the chord all the way out every time.
 
The main reason pull chords bust is pulling them all the way to the limit. That pust stress on all the components envolved and can brake any one of them. Do what Sidewinder Jerry suggested and pull it to the top of the compression stroke, but don't pull the chord all the way out every time.
I generally can crank my bike or any of my lawn equipment with 5 pulls or less.
 
I generally can crank my bike or any of my lawn equipment with 5 pulls or less.
Same here. I had a push mower at one point that a friend gave me, I got the thing running to where it wpuld start on one lazy pull. All of my briggs engines can start on 2 to 3 lazy pulls or 1 to 2 fast pulls.
 
Same here. I had a push mower at one point that a friend gave me, I got the thing running to where it wpuld start on one lazy pull. All of my briggs engines can start on 2 to 3 lazy pulls or 1 to 2 fast pulls.
In very cold weather one may have to use the old hair dryer hot air into the carburetor trick.
 
Bigger engines 3HP and up, you have to be mindful of kickback, it'll rip the cord right out of your hand, sometimes breaking itself in the process (or your hand).

It happens on a rare occasion, but if it happens a lot, check your valve lash and flywheel.

It's best to pull slowly till it grabs the starter cup and then give it a quick, short pull.

I have only had one pull start break on a lawnmower, but it was already a garbage picked piece of junk.
 
Bigger engines 3HP and up, you have to be mindful of kickback, it'll rip the cord right out of your hand, sometimes breaking itself in the process (or your hand).

It happens on a rare occasion, but if it happens a lot, check your valve lash and flywheel.

It's best to pull slowly till it grabs the starter cup and then give it a quick, short pull.

I have only had one pull start break on a lawnmower, but it was already a garbage picked piece of junk.
The only pull starter I've had rip from my hand is my fourwheeler, but that thing has no compression release and is a 400cc 2 stroke
 
Back
Top