Last week of June, first week of July, Continental Divide Trail .....

triple threat

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I have a vacation coming last week of June, and first week of July, leaving the Austin area probably on the thursday or friday of the 20 - 21 before that last week to accommodate some of the travel time to the start off point. I plan on following the Adventure Cycling Maps, looking at the option of starting off on the Continental Divide Trail, south to north, planning on driving from Austin to El Paso then riding to the starting point at Columbus NM or near Antelope Wells New Mexico. Ride till time runs out, we reach the end or mechanic issues force withdrawl. Camping most of the time, hotel once in a while..... if we reach the end or time expires we rent a car/van and return to Austin....... looking for a couple or few crazies wanting to do something ....that hasn't been done yet. Here's a little teaser from Adventure Cycling, this is heading north to south.....
 


Herman Klutz

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Good luck, I recommend Googling "ollie bray reflections great divide", there are several articles about his trip from Banff to Antelope Wells. Read his stories and his logistical help and ideas.
 

FurryOnTheInside

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I'm sure you will have a great adventure on the great divide!
I love the Great Divide episode of Iohan Gueorguiev's See The World series. Different place in winter though, and without an engine lol.
 

triple threat

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If you liked Iohan's adventures you may enjoy Ed's....... If I don't find a victim , lol, for the CDT ride, I may just do it either on my KLR 650 or purchace a Honda CT 110, it's been done many tmes on a KLR ..... not so with the Honda CT 110. It's just the masochist in me wanting to do it on a motorized bike. https://www.youtube.com/user/c90adventures/videos
 

triple threat

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Good luck, I recommend Googling "ollie bray reflections great divide", there are several articles about his trip from Banff to Antelope Wells. Read his stories and his logistical help and ideas.
Thank you, I have been reading thru blogs, watching thru you tube videos all I can, it's amazing what one can gleam from all the videos and blogs people post. I watch the nicely organized ones, the got thru just by luck ones, and the train wrecks. You can identify problems mechanical, route finding, supplies. Having a full set of maps for the ride and a list of resource locations, Thanks again......
 

Herman Klutz

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Do you have someone that could drive a support vehicle close tp the route that can carry parts, and repair gear? If not do you have someone that you can call to overnight ship parts if something breaks down? Overnight express to a post office is only good if your support person has what you need. It is the unexpected that dooms a trip like this, 2 ruined tires in the middle of nowhere and you only have one extra tire will make your day. Pulling a small trailer maybe a better option than heavy paniers that will throw you off balance. New Mexico roads are not like Texas roads, so I kind of doubt if this trail is a "jewel". Know where every Dollar Store, Walmart and bicycle shop is that is located near the route you are taking. Some of this area is real remote. and you will be on your or at the mercy of some good Samaritan rancher or cowboy.

We used to spend a lot of time in New Mexico during the summers, so here are my thoughts on the monsoon rains, the monsoon rains can bring some torrential rainfall in the desert. These rains can come without a real warning and the temps will drop with the rain fall. Rain gear can be useless but trash bags are lightweight and easy to carry, because you will want some sort of protection especially for your gear and supplies that you are dragging along. Some of those arroyos are dangerous when it rains up stream, walls of water can come flying down them. On the other hand drinking water in places can be non existent, so you will need to carry plenty of water.

Fire restrictions, in some areas you may not always be able to have a campfire, they take burn bans as serious as we do here in Texas. You don't want a $500 ticket for an illegal campfire, so you will need some sort of propane or white gas stove to heat meals. On meals, plan them ahead, if you will be carrying canned stuff, and it what you normally eat, it shouldn't be a problem, but if you are grabbing strange stuff not usually in your diet, acclimate your body to it. Toilets will sometime be provided by mother nature, so you want tp take a roll or 2 of toilet paper.
 

triple threat

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May 29, 2008
Messages
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Do you have someone that could drive a support vehicle close tp the route that can carry parts, and repair gear? If not do you have someone that you can call to overnight ship parts if something breaks down? Overnight express to a post office is only good if your support person has what you need. It is the unexpected that dooms a trip like this, 2 ruined tires in the middle of nowhere and you only have one extra tire will make your day. Pulling a small trailer maybe a better option than heavy paniers that will throw you off balance. New Mexico roads are not like Texas roads, so I kind of doubt if this trail is a "jewel". Know where every Dollar Store, Walmart and bicycle shop is that is located near the route you are taking. Some of this area is real remote. and you will be on your or at the mercy of some good Samaritan rancher or cowboy.

We used to spend a lot of time in New Mexico during the summers, so here are my thoughts on the monsoon rains, the monsoon rains can bring some torrential rainfall in the desert. These rains can come without a real warning and the temps will drop with the rain fall. Rain gear can be useless but trash bags are lightweight and easy to carry, because you will want some sort of protection especially for your gear and supplies that you are dragging along. Some of those arroyos are dangerous when it rains up stream, walls of water can come flying down them. On the other hand drinking water in places can be non existent, so you will need to carry plenty of water.

Fire restrictions, in some areas you may not always be able to have a campfire, they take burn bans as serious as we do here in Texas. You don't want a $500 ticket for an illegal campfire, so you will need some sort of propane or white gas stove to heat meals. On meals, plan them ahead, if you will be carrying canned stuff, and it what you normally eat, it shouldn't be a problem, but if you are grabbing strange stuff not usually in your diet, acclimate your body to it. Toilets will sometime be provided by mother nature, so you want tp take a roll or 2 of toilet paper.
Thanks Herman, for the tires I will be using a combo of liners, slime, thicker tubes and a spare tire. I do plan on using a bob or as an alternate is a tag-a-long it is used for kids BUT removing the crank arms, seat and handle bars creates a handy and cheap trailer (easily obtained at thrift stores and pawn stops) I camp light and dont plan on carrying more than 35 - 40 lbs and keeping it light and "fast", since I not in a huge hurry ( what I don't get done this year.... I will next year) if something happens that cant be overcome .... pedal out to the nearest major city and rent a car or with the family being relatively close for the first week, and simply call for rescue.

Rainy season will be in the middle of our trip hitting NM around early July, i have a set of frog togs that work well in rain or as a wind breaker set over clothing and coats, besides bivy sack I use a tarp, tarps give you more options... down low they break the wind and rain, rigged high they allow you headroom and options for cooking and repairs. Anticipating some mud and NM mud can be terrible slow going (I'm from west Texas and was in NM alot during college) all gear will have separate bags ( if you place everything in one bag if that one gets compromised everything gets wet.) crutial items -- sleeping bag, cold weather gear and clean clothes are in dry bags. I carry lots of water , hiking in Palo Duro Canyon outside Amarillo and Guadalupe Mtns taught me that, and I carry a filter.

I use to have campfires they are the "romantic" side of camping but overall they are inefficient now i use a white gas stove , small easy to use and with a windscreen very efficient. I stay away from cans for the pack it in ...pack it out aspect, I am constantly on the look out in HEB, Whole Foods, and local stores for dry foods that you mix with water, I try them at home for ease of cooking and taste. No use taking something you really don't want to eat and always take tp and a basic first aid kit on a all day hike or weekend to weeks trip. it serves way more than one use. Considering I plan on hitting a town/city once every 2 -3 days I will always have 2 days of food onboard but eat off my plan or stock. If I do end up going it alone I will be carrying a Spot as well..... sh*t happens.

I have been looking at this for a while now, and at 60, i need to go while I am still a young man....lol. I have been playing the what if's, planning ahead, trying to anticipate the problems and feel like the biggest unknown for me is the mechanical... the motor.... It will be a 4 stroke, 49cc, with a jackshaft ( to take advantage of the gears) keeping the stock gas tank which will force me to stop, refuel, check over the motor,oil, chains, and gears, take a break from the bike every couple of hours at least. ..... then begin again.

I appreciate the imput and it makes me examine the details of the trip......
 

Herman Klutz

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I am in my 70's, and your are right do it while you are physically able to. I would have to pull a trailer with a walker and medical supplies. Be careful of the bears and rattlesnakes.
 

triple threat

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Thanks Herman, I hope to still be doing the outdoors thing into my 70's..... just gotta take it a bit slower..... the ground can be alot closer ... and further away on occasion. Bears do concern me only a bit, by june-july they should be outta hibernation and have a few weeks of grub in their bellys, tho those with curious cubs can be troublesome, I am taking a small bottle of bear spray/mace and a loud bike horn.... the kind you use a pressurized air with.
 
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