Longevity of Japan 2 strokes over Chinese 2 strokes

mark20

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#21
I think husqvarna bought out zenoah, not sure but maybe they have a partnership or something.
im not very sure as we have not bought a chainsaw in the last few years ( we moved to a townhouse, we only have 2 8ft tree's now)
but if you fell like you can handle the cost, go for it!
but im not one to spend much on a project ( if i had 300$, i would just get a 212 kit, much more fun, and possibly more reliable as your not hitting the throttle as much)
but keep in mind,
YOUR MONEY, YOUR CHOICE
 


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#22
I have a 212 hemi sitting in the garage, never been run plan is to put it on the mini chopper that I posted a pic of earlier in this thread. Billet rod is only $64 and billet flywheel is $105, valve springs aren't very much but I'm planning to build the engine. For now I'm going for something that is small and 49cc or under due to Pa moped laws. You legally have to register motorized bikes as a moped here, I looked up the laws. Now if I have a beach cruiser with a modded predator going full speed down the road what cop wouldn't notice lol. The reason I'm thinking Japanese is to have a more reliable commuting bike (and not get in trouble). I have noticed several options of small Japanese engines are discontinued which is annoying.
 

darwin

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#23
If I were to go with a 35cc or so size motor [4stroke] I'd go with the honda due to price and quality. Perfect motor for cruising at 20mph. Lil weak on the hills but hey it's a 35cc.
 
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#24
If I were to go with a 35cc or so size motor [4stroke] I'd go with the honda due to price and quality. Perfect motor for cruising at 20mph. Lil weak on the hills but hey it's a 35cc.
Does sound like a pretty reliable motor. I wish I could buy just the centrifugal clutch box with the belt pulley and make my own mounting brackets. The gebe kit is $350 with no motor and a few cables just looking for a cheaper route. The sheave is plastic btw. I could possibly get a metal aftermarket one for a whizzer. The next few months are when I want to build a bike so come spring I can use it. Was thinking a 24 inch aluminum bike would that be too small for a “5”10 190 lb person?
 

darwin

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#25
Doesn't Bonefish have a GEBE kit for sale in the for sale section? Make him an offer he can't refuse!
 
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#26
Yeah I'm not sure but I think he wanted more than GEBE sells them for might have included the wheel though I think he said $475. *Correction $425*
 

darwin

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#27
Bonefish has a GEBE kit for sale in the sale section. Separate that gold plated Subaru from it and it might be a deal. Make him an offer he can't refuse!
 

FNTPuck

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#28
Sounds good. I'm just waiting for a couple of components from China. I have some 14mm ring terminals that I think are suitable for the type K thermocouple mount.
I'm going to mount either a Raspi or Aduino to do some data aquisition and display. Just because it's the sort of thing I like to do. I love hard data.
I'm thinking some temperature, rpm, and vibration data will be useful. Since it will likely be a small display if any, for the temperature, I'll probably set up an RGB LED temperature status light. Maybe mounted in the lower part of the speedometer or tachometer dial face. That could give me a Green "OK" plus some statuses of yellow/orange/red blinking etc. Maybe even a 10-segment bar graph for temp. But I'm just talking and not building for now...
Now you're talking my language! An Arduino or RPI would be awesome for a simple data display. Depending on how well you can code(or can likely find most of the apps you need in repositories), you can get a cheap small ~5-6" touchscreen from ebay or amazon to connect to it and run a stripped down Linux distro to run an info app for a dashboard. Even better than a wheel sensor for the speedo, for probably around ~$15 you can get a GPS module for the RPI and have not only actual speed but can setup turn by turn GPS directions as well. Then with the built in BT capabilities it can send the directions right to earbuds or helmet speakers and also be a media center as well. Overkill? Probably, but cheap and would be fun to work on.

I am working on using an RPI to trigger relays attached to the motherboard pins on remote servers so I can reboot and cold start them automatically from a simple host ping script when they lock up. Also started plans for an Arduino to control the peltier setup on my computer to dynamically adjust the duty cycle based on calculated dew point. I have a controller that does it now, but it won't let me do straight manual duty cycle control. I installed a switch on one line of the thermocouple though to trick it into allowing me to manually set it down to 0c(since it makes it think the dew point is 0c), but I'd like to be able to go below that.
 

junglepig

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#29
Now you're talking my language! An Arduino or RPI would be awesome for a simple data display. Depending on how well you can code(or can likely find most of the apps you need in repositories), you can get a cheap small ~5-6" touchscreen from ebay or amazon to connect to it and run a stripped down Linux distro to run an info app for a dashboard. Even better than a wheel sensor for the speedo, for probably around ~$15 you can get a GPS module for the RPI and have not only actual speed but can setup turn by turn GPS directions as well. Then with the built in BT capabilities it can send the directions right to earbuds or helmet speakers and also be a media center as well. Overkill? Probably, but cheap and would be fun to work on.

I am working on using an RPI to trigger relays attached to the motherboard pins on remote servers so I can reboot and cold start them automatically from a simple host ping script when they lock up. Also started plans for an Arduino to control the peltier setup on my computer to dynamically adjust the duty cycle based on calculated dew point. I have a controller that does it now, but it won't let me do straight manual duty cycle control. I installed a switch on one line of the thermocouple though to trick it into allowing me to manually set it down to 0c(since it makes it think the dew point is 0c), but I'd like to be able to go below that.
Yeah, a remote hard reboot on a server is definitely great tool in some cases where the server won't respond otherwise, and the function needs to be restored ASAP. I used to do a lot of remote control-systems support for plant equipment. Sometimes, the plant couldn't wait for me to drive an hour or two to them to get something up again before things got dicey or expensive. I usually could guide a human to force the reboot, but automating it where it makes sense and is safe to do is the ticket.

I did control systems - PLCs/DCS/HMI/SCADA/DAQ engineering work before my body broke down a few years ago. LOL, probably from being on call all the damn time! The meds I have to take now and the pain I have cause some frustration with doing technical work that used to be easy for me. But I can still code anything I really need, and the support libraries for arduino and pi are ubiquitous and decent. The possibilities are endless indeed.

Your peltier cooler sounds cool. (but clearly you don't want to let it get too cool, lol. liquid water is no bueno there.) Replacing your controller with an arduino and your own code will be great. BTW, I've used 10K NTC thermistors for easy temp measurements on arduino. I built a crock pot controller for making yogurt and sous vide cooking. And also to pasteurize eggs without cooking them to make safe to eat cookie dough and cake batter for my kids, LOL.
I've worked with thermocouple inputs a lot industrially, but for my CHT, I'm going to try a MAX 6675 module from eBay. Interface is SPI, so I'll need a micro. Total cost of the CHT monitor will be around $10. Maybe a little more depending on how I display it.

I haven't done much raspi or arduino work since my son graduated HS. I used to mentor his robotics team. So, I'm a little rusty, but it'll come back as I need it.

So in my infirm and uncertain retirement situation, I hope to have some fun and share some ideas. I'm not very sharp anymore, but I ain't dead yet either.
 

FNTPuck

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#31
Yeah, a remote hard reboot on a server is definitely great tool in some cases where the server won't respond otherwise, and the function needs to be restored ASAP. I used to do a lot of remote control-systems support for plant equipment. Sometimes, the plant couldn't wait for me to drive an hour or two to them to get something up again before things got dicey or expensive. I usually could guide a human to force the reboot, but automating it where it makes sense and is safe to do is the ticket.

I did control systems - PLCs/DCS/HMI/SCADA/DAQ engineering work before my body broke down a few years ago. LOL, probably from being on call all the damn time! The meds I have to take now and the pain I have cause some frustration with doing technical work that used to be easy for me. But I can still code anything I really need, and the support libraries for arduino and pi are ubiquitous and decent. The possibilities are endless indeed.

Your peltier cooler sounds cool. (but clearly you don't want to let it get too cool, lol. liquid water is no bueno there.) Replacing your controller with an arduino and your own code will be great. BTW, I've used 10K NTC thermistors for easy temp measurements on arduino. I built a crock pot controller for making yogurt and sous vide cooking. And also to pasteurize eggs without cooking them to make safe to eat cookie dough and cake batter for my kids, LOL.
I've worked with thermocouple inputs a lot industrially, but for my CHT, I'm going to try a MAX 6675 module from eBay. Interface is SPI, so I'll need a micro. Total cost of the CHT monitor will be around $10. Maybe a little more depending on how I display it.

I haven't done much raspi or arduino work since my son graduated HS. I used to mentor his robotics team. So, I'm a little rusty, but it'll come back as I need it.

So in my infirm and uncertain retirement situation, I hope to have some fun and share some ideas. I'm not very sharp anymore, but I ain't dead yet either.
Yea, I use lab grade 10k ATH thermistors that have a very fast response time which is important when you want to run at a dynamic 1* above dew point. For 24/7 use that means the cold plate is usually around 18*c but I can get it down to 3-4* under load if I want. I used to run a chiller in line with it and it had no problem holding 0c with the peltier plate at only ~40% duty cycle, so I know it was capable of well under 0c but controller wouldn't allow it.

These are the thermistors I use vs the big cheap slow ones which made it difficult to hold a set temp (it would ramp up and down constantly). They are glass bead and epoxy sealed with a sub1s thermal response time. Most cheap thermistors like for the adafruit and RPI are up to 10 seconds to fully adjust to temp changes. Its rated to 270c which is over 500*f so would be great for a CHT probe.
 
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#32
Ok I have no idea what you guys are talking about btw but Floridaboy that seems to be a cheaper but still good quality choice engine wise. Some of the engines I was looking at are $300 or more so it would be more affordable.
 

darwin

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#33
Will are you dead set on a smoker? Staton still has the tanakas for sale. If a 4 stroke why not a Huasheng 38cc or a 49er. Both great lil motors and cheap to buy, plus parts are readily available. Just don't fall for gas bikes ebay ad on the 38cc for $325 or so. You can buy them for $125 if you look. Then there's the good old honda gx 35cc for $250 or so new.
 
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#34
They say it’s half the cost to run a 4 stroke because the oil stays in the motor without burning, with a 2 stroke you always add more oil when you fill up. With this small of a 4 stroke it only should take a few ounces and it can last from what I’ve heard 300-400 miles. before changing, might be worth it. I would like to try both the 2 stroke and 4 stroke engines. Probably will go with the gx35. I will try the electric start Mitsubishi clone first that I already have. That opens opportunities for a horn, taillight, turn signals, the works which is what I’m going for. Just need a new carb and battery. If I don’t like it I can just unbolt it and put on a different motor. Was thinking I could use a 4 inch light bar as a headlight maybe even get some fairings fenders are required though and not sure what I’ll do about that.
 

junglepig

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#35
Yea, I use lab grade 10k ATH thermistors that have a very fast response time which is important when you want to run at a dynamic 1* above dew point. For 24/7 use that means the cold plate is usually around 18*c but I can get it down to 3-4* under load if I want. I used to run a chiller in line with it and it had no problem holding 0c with the peltier plate at only ~40% duty cycle, so I know it was capable of well under 0c but controller wouldn't allow it.

These are the thermistors I use vs the big cheap slow ones which made it difficult to hold a set temp (it would ramp up and down constantly). They are glass bead and epoxy sealed with a sub1s thermal response time. Most cheap thermistors like for the adafruit and RPI are up to 10 seconds to fully adjust to temp changes. Its rated to 270c which is over 500*f so would be great for a CHT probe.
Yeah, with thermal sensors, the response of the sensor is often a first-order dynamic. If you know the time constant of the probe, you can model the response into a nice prediction of the actual temperature you are trying to measure. Take the derivative, or slope, of the temperature measurement and multiply it by the time constant, then add it to your current measurement and you will get a surprisingly accurate approximation of the instantaneous temperature you want to measure. This is how good digital "instant read" thermometers work, e.g.
Once you get the slow dynamics of you measurement device out of the control loop, it is much easier to achieve stable control.
That's why you will be able to do so much better writing your own control on the arduino.
You should be able to essentially take your 10 second response time element, and after taking two readings 0.5 seconds apart predict the temperature it would read if you waited for it to approach it's final temp. A little math turns the 10s element into a 0.5s element!
You can use the same trick with your fast element too, of course, and make it that much better.

Thanks for the info on the thermistors you're using. I generally like thermistors for temps closer to 25 degC that don't change too much because it's easier to pick a divider resistor and focus on a narrower range of temperature and keep good accuracy over the range of interest, but I might try one for head temp, and thread the type K into the exhaust header for exhaust gas temps, just for fun.
 

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