New build, fork decision

kracksmith

New Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2012
Messages
1
I'm new and just purchased a frame with gas tank attached, the removable one.

https://www.bikeberry.com/bbr-tuning-26-motorized-bike-frame-w-2-4l-brushed-aluminum-tank.html

Need to decide what forks to get, I don't like the springer type, thinking to get a mountain bike front fork instead. Is the zoom too cheapy for long term?

My motor will be 4 stroke and maybe plan to have it modified to be faster of course. Like to look legal only. If frame can't fit a 4 stroke, then 2 stroke 49cc bored out to 80cc.

so front fork doesn't need to be high performance or expensive, is there something in the medium range?
 


GreasyChris

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
747
Cheap suspension forks don't last very long on a motorized bike. Your safest option and my personal favorite is rigid triple tree forks. They come in different lengths and are available in 1" and 1&1/8th head tubes. And are available with a disc brake mount.
If you're looking for extra heavy duty the triple tree forks off a west coast chopper have 1&1/8 steer tube and the fork tubes are huge at 37.5mm diameter. No disc brake mount so you'd have to weld your own.
 

FurryOnTheInside

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2013
Messages
3,682
I like vintage "high end-ish" Marzocchi suspension forks with 1&1/8" steerer.
The weight of older technology open oil bath suspension forks made them obsolete in mountain biking and the enduro/trail park mtb trend, but is not such a disadvantage on a motorised bike that is mainly used for going fast on the road. In fact it manages the heat generated in sustained high speed use better than systems with lower volume and less circulation of oil.

What steerer diameter does your frame require? What length? Most used forks have been cut to length already so it's important to verify that the steerer will be long enough as well as the correct diameter before buying a vintage fork.

Also the seller should be honest about the condition of the seals.. They tend to last well in the open bath forks because they aren't under pressure and the oil volume is so great, but you can spend as much replacing them as the fork cost if they turn out to all be worn out or are difficult to find, or if you have to pay someone else to do the repair job. If you buy on the auction site then ask the seller so he has to put it in writing and then you will have a case for a refund if the condition is not as expected.
 
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