New build, general questions

Is the 5 ok for now considering the weather in my area? I haven't checked the plug in about a week or two.
For a regular China Girl, yes...For the Phantom, NO.

Heat range in a plug has nothing to do with weather temps or how hot the engine runs, it governs the self cleaning ability of the spark plug itself so as to be able to burn off any deposits off of the plug tip itself
 
Is the 5 ok for now considering the weather in my area? I haven't checked the plug in about a week or two.

For a regular China Girl, yes...For the Phantom, NO.
Understood. My goal is to take as best of care as possible to the motor I currently have and the phantom I want to get. So much knowledge to still learn. That was one reason I wanted to upgrade to the phantom is because there are standards to what to use or do and what not to. With the current China girl it was an experiment to see if it was possible to use it as an everyday ride to work. It has performed well under the stresses I have run it through. Well again thank you. I'll be on the forum a bit more considering I actually got over the jitters of asking questions
 
higher octane gas needs a higher temp to ignite. Not sure the truth behind that. Also I run an ngk b5hs plug
It's not necessarily "more heat" to ignite. It requires more input energy to break the molecular bonds of the longer hydrocarbon chains in the fuel in order to ignite. That input energy is heat. One way you add that energy in is by advancing the ignition timing, which increases combustion pressures, and thanks to the ideal gas law - temperatures. That is why high performance engines that require premium fuel have higher compression ratios and more aggressive ignition timing curves. If that same fuel is put into a low compression engine with a lazy timing curve it can cause incomplete combustion, or delayed combustion that leads to lower combustion pressures and slow flame fronts.

Pre-ignition is literally caused by the fuel igniting on it's own, usually due to high tempertures being enough to start breaking the covalent bonds of the shorter molecular chains on it's own. Aka, bang when you don't want bang. This is why higher octane fuel is used, it takes more energy to break those bonds, thus it doesn't ignite as easily in the same conditions.

So yes, it's true.
 
It's not necessarily "more heat" to ignite. It requires more input energy to break the molecular bonds of the longer hydrocarbon chains in the fuel in order to ignite. That input energy is heat. One way you add that energy in is by advancing the ignition timing, which increases combustion pressures, and thanks to the ideal gas law - temperatures. That is why high performance engines that require premium fuel have higher compression ratios and more aggressive ignition timing curves. If that same fuel is put into a low compression engine with a lazy timing curve it can cause incomplete combustion, or delayed combustion that leads to lower combustion pressures and slow flame fronts.

Pre-ignition is literally caused by the fuel igniting on it's own, usually due to high tempertures being enough to start breaking the covalent bonds of the shorter molecular chains on it's own. Aka, bang when you don't want bang. This is why higher octane fuel is used, it takes more energy to break those bonds, thus it doesn't ignite as easily in the same conditions.

So yes, it's true.

I like to say in simple terms, low octane burns like a bang, high octane burns with a push.

low octane is more volatile, High octane is more stable.

Releasticly, if you don't spark knock with low octane, there is no reason to burn a higher grade.

But since oil kills octane, I would run at least 89.
 
But since oil kills octane, I would run at least 89.
Chinese measurement of octane ratings which is also quite different from ours...The highest octane necessary to run CGs is 85 to 86 octane when it is translated into our method of certifying octane ratings.
 
I Chinese measurement of octane rating which is also quite different from ours...The highest octane necessary to run CGs is 85 to 86 octane when it is translated into our method of certifying octane ratings.
But extra octane is a buffer for when fuel starts to lose it's freshness.

Plus, most ethanol free boat fuel is 89.

I should mention to others, mix your fuel in 1 litre batches to keep your can of fuel fresher.
 
But extra octane is a buffer for when fuel starts to lose it's freshness.

Plus, most ethanol free boat fuel is 89.

I should mention to others, mix your fuel in 1 litre batches to keep your can of fuel fresher.
Ethanol Free gasoline does not have this "freshness" issue you are talking about...It will keep for many months sealed in a normal plastic jerry jug for fuel.

No one in their right mind only mixes just a litre of fuel at a time...I can burn up that much in one outing...lol.

1 gallon gas can, Ethanol free gasoline, add oil, shake vigorously to mix thoroughly, pour into gas tank...seal gas jug, Now go enjoy your ride and not overthink things out here, it's not rocket science.
 
Ethanol Free gasoline does not have this "freshness" issue you are talking about...It will keep for many months sealed in a normal plastic jerry jug for fuel.

No one in their right mind only mixes just a litre of fuel at a time...I can burn up that much in one outing...lol.

1 gallon gas can, Ethanol free gasoline, add oil, shake vigorously to mix thoroughly...seal gas jug and enjoy your ride
Assuming someone is using 10% ethanol gas, the oil does make it go bad faster if it doesn't have stabilizers in it.

Bad fuel problems can make you chase your tail.

Of course, if you ride more, you can mix more.
 
Back
Top