New To This! (Would this Bike Work?)

ArmandoSpiffy

New Member
Joined
May 17, 2021
Messages
1
Hey everyone!

I’m new to the forum and bike world, but have been lurking for the past few years around the subject.

This bike has been sitting in my parents garage since the mid 2000’s. My brother bought it then, and barely used it. I know it may need a tune up and obviously some air in the tires, but how well would this work for a motorized bike set-up? If it does work, I’d love your input on how to modify it.

Also, I’m 6’1” and 235lbs and wondering if a Motorized Bike is even an option for me?

Thanks in advance for helping out a total n00b!

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mony0_3

Active Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2020
Messages
227
Hey everyone!

I’m new to the forum and bike world, but have been lurking for the past few years around the subject.

This bike has been sitting in my parents garage since the mid 2000’s. My brother bought it then, and barely used it. I know it may need a tune up and obviously some air in the tires, but how well would this work for a motorized bike set-up? If it does work, I’d love your input on how to modify it.

Also, I’m 6’1” and 235lbs and wondering if a Motorized Bike is even an option for me?

Thanks in advance for helping out a total n00b!

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That bike will work, built a few like it.
 

Chainlube

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2020
Messages
4,515
Yea, the good old fashioned mountain bike, nothing like them for motorizing. The typical 80/66 kit will make a fine bike. If you got any kind of fab skills, customize a jog scooter pipe to fit it, for that little extra punch. I'm 230 and mine zips right along.
 
Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
36
Yes, as far as a frame, but those brakes are a death sentence to anyone going faster than 20mph. Upgrade to Discs. Bikeberry.com sells kits for converting from rubber pads to discs.
We all know how unreliable rubber on steel is, especially if you get caught in the rain. Then Fred Flintstone-ing it will be the only brakes you have.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
2,326
I'm 6'2" and 235 lbs been riding for years. I'd suggest getting a suspension seat post and a wider seat along with road slick tires if you plan to ride on pavement only. Not sure what size frame you have but I put a handlebar riser on my bike, so that I now ride in more of an upright position.
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Sidewinder Jerry

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Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
2,326
Your brakes are just fine I live in the mountains. Down hill speeds can exceed 45+ mph. I used rim brakes for years on my LandRider that shifted 7 engine driven gears automatically. However in saying that, all brake pads aren't created equally. You tend to get what you're willing to pay for. The pads I used cost around around $40-50 for a set of front and rear. Though I feel my life is worth at least that much.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
2,326
Yes, as far as a frame, but those brakes are a death sentence to anyone going faster than 20mph. Upgrade to Discs. Bikeberry.com sells kits for converting from rubber pads to discs.
We all know how unreliable rubber on steel is, especially if you get caught in the rain. Then Fred Flintstone-ing it will be the only brakes you have.
Not all pads are created equally. Not all rim pads are made of rubber like the department store ones are. Unless you weather proof your engine I don't advise ever riding in the rain. Lots of weather apps for cellphones now. Still one can buy wet condition rim pads.
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
36
Not all pads are created equally. Not all rim pads are made of rubber like the department store ones are. Unless you weather proof your engine I don't advise ever riding in the rain. Lots of weather apps for cellphones now. Still one can buy wet condition rim pads.
Says the guy who's own bike, as pictured, is equipped with disc brakes...

Side pull---Dinosaur era.

Cantilever--- Much improved over side pull, and yes, the brake pad material has changed, but not enough to make staying with rubber/silicone on metal rims worthwhile.

Drum brakes--- When you can find a good tandem bike hub with good shoes, buy it. But just like coaster brakes, you have to really modulate how much pressure you apply to the lever, or a rear wheel lock up is in your future.

Disc brakes--- If rubber on steel was so awesome, even with custom pad material, why is every new bike worth it's name equipped with at the very least, front disc brakes? Could it be that consumers have been complaining about rubber on steel brakes for decades, and the technology has finally caught up to make disc brakes on bicycles both affordable and easily accessible? Hmm, could be!

Honestly though, and no offense to Jerry, that Raleigh will do you just fine, just remember to roll off the throttle first! Gas motors, especially 2 strokes, have sh*t for torque, but it's still enough to launch you through an intersection, with those rubber brakes smoking...

Also, check out the for sale section, as I have everything that bike needs to become a motorized bike, from the motor to the wheels (which have disc brakes), all the cables, motor plates, derailleur and assorted bits to have you motoring along.

 

Sidewinder Jerry

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
2,326
Says the guy who's own bike, as pictured, is equipped with disc brakes...

Side pull---Dinosaur era.

Cantilever--- Much improved over side pull, and yes, the brake pad material has changed, but not enough to make staying with rubber/silicone on metal rims worthwhile.

Drum brakes--- When you can find a good tandem bike hub with good shoes, buy it. But just like coaster brakes, you have to really modulate how much pressure you apply to the lever, or a rear wheel lock up is in your future.

Disc brakes--- If rubber on steel was so awesome, even with custom pad material, why is every new bike worth it's name equipped with at the very least, front disc brakes? Could it be that consumers have been complaining about rubber on steel brakes for decades, and the technology has finally caught up to make disc brakes on bicycles both affordable and easily accessible? Hmm, could be!

Honestly though, and no offense to Jerry, that Raleigh will do you just fine, just remember to roll off the throttle first! Gas motors, especially 2 strokes, have sh*t for torque, but it's still enough to launch you through an intersection, with those rubber brakes smoking...

Also, check out the for sale section, as I have everything that bike needs to become a motorized bike, from the motor to the wheels (which have disc brakes), all the cables, motor plates, derailleur and assorted bits to have you motoring along.

Guess you overlooked the part where I said My LandRider bike. All I was showing on my current bike the Sidewinder was the stem raiser.

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Gatlinburg TN, look close the bike has rim brakes. Here good brakes is a must. Rubber on steel will get you killed in the mountains; 50+ foot drop offs on the side of the roads. I had this bike for 10 years before retiring it and building the Sidewinder. When it comes to pads I know what works and what doesn't.
 
Joined
May 10, 2021
Messages
36
Guess you overlooked the part where I said My LandRider bike. All I was showing on my current bike the Sidewinder was the stem raiser.

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Gatlinburg TN, look close the bike has rim brakes. Here good brakes is a must. Rubber on steel will get you killed in the mountains; 50+ foot drop offs on the side of the roads. I had this bike for 10 years before retiring it and building the Sidewinder. When it comes to pads I know what works and what doesn't.
Easy, easy. I'm not looking for a fight or to start a "Who's better than who" at this sport.
 
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