NO FLEX Hybrid mag wheels

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I just wanted to follow this up with some observations since I've built a lot of wheels in my time as a bike tech.

Where Jayraye drilled the spoke "j" ends isn't going to appreciably strengthen or stiffen the wheel. This is a fact based on what makes most bike and motorcycle wheels strong in the first place is lacing and the triangulation of the width across the hub flanges. Going with heavier gauge spokes in this case will not help much.

Have any of you who have played around with bike wheels noted where the spoke's J ends anchor?, Well it's close to the outside of the hub width at the Hub/spoke flange, which is true for most wheels, (Derailleur rear wheel hubs are a slight exception here...) and generally they work in two pairs from opposing directions side to side and also axially. The more spokes and the heavier gauge does help with strength But in Jay's wheel the spokes are anchored quite close to the middle of the hub and they are also radially spoked, both of which don't really help the strength of the wheel except for forces pulling away from the hub center outwards. I'm finding that these mag wheels flexing is probably due more to the fact that they were made more as decorative bike bling and less about their actual strength. I would not want to be using these on anything more powerful than a 350 watt E-bike and I would not trust them at any speeds over 20 mph. especially on a heavy unsuspended bicycle.

If Jay is fine with this amount of danger in his life then who am I to judge. I'm just making some observations based on his claims for this wheel.
 
I just wanted to follow this up with some observations since I've built a lot of wheels in my time as a bike tech.

Where Jayraye drilled the spoke "j" ends isn't going to appreciably strengthen or stiffen the wheel. This is a fact based on what makes most bike and motorcycle wheels strong in the first place is lacing and the triangulation of the width across the hub flanges. Going with heavier gauge spokes in this case will not help much.

Have any of you who have played around with bike wheels noted where the spoke's J ends anchor?, Well it's close to the outside of the hub width at the Hub/spoke flange, which is true for most wheels, (Derailleur rear wheel hubs are a slight exception here...) and generally they work in two pairs from opposing directions side to side and also axially. The more spokes and the heavier gauge does help with strength But in Jay's wheel the spokes are anchored quite close to the middle of the hub and they are also radially spoked, both of which don't really help the strength of the wheel except for forces pulling away from the hub center outwards. I'm finding that these mag wheels flexing is probably due more to the fact that they were made more as decorative bike bling and less about their actual strength. I would not want to be using these on anything more powerful than a 350 watt E-bike and I would not trust them at any speeds over 20 mph. especially on a heavy unsuspended bicycle.

If Jay is fine with this amount of danger in his life then who am I to judge. I'm just making some observations based on his claims for this wheel.
Not sure if you read the whole
Thread I was not trying to lace the wheels for strength I laced them to reduce side to side Flex the spokes that I added reduced Flex on these mag wheels by at least 50% they were much stronger and stable with the parallel spokes. but upon doing so and riding them for quite some time. I found that there are more serious failure points to these mag wheels. in this case the bearing being hollowed out of its seating and allowing play of the entire wheel on the axle. I have since toss these rims and I use a 12 gauge 48 spoke 2 inch wide aluminum wheel which seems to be a hell of a lot more stable but by no means was I trying to lace these to be a stronger mag wheel only to reduce side to side Flex. Which was a complete success
 
Not sure if you read the whole
Thread I was not trying to lace the wheels for strength I laced them to reduce side to side Flex the spokes that I added reduced Flex on these mag wheels by at least 50% they were much stronger and stable with the parallel spokes. but upon doing so and riding them for quite some time. I found that there are more serious failure points to these mag wheels. in this case the bearing being hollowed out of its seating and allowing play of the entire wheel on the axle. I have since toss these rims and I use a 12 gauge 48 spoke 2 inch wide aluminum wheel which seems to be a hell of a lot more stable but by no means was I trying to lace these to be a stronger mag wheel only to reduce side to side Flex. Which was a complete success
The spokes, as you have installed them are going to do zip for side to side strength and rigidity. You do understand why bicycle and motorcycle wheels for the past 140 years have been laced from flanges situated as close to the axle ends as practical? I mean you claim to be a college student studying mechanical engineering. I did read your posts, and I think you're mistaken.

Spokes work purely under tension.
 
The spokes, as you have installed them are going to do zip for side to side strength and rigidity. You do understand why bicycle and motorcycle wheels for the past 140 years have been laced from flanges situated as close to the axle ends as practical? I mean you claim to be a college student studying mechanical engineering. I did read your posts, and I think you're mistaken.

Spokes work purely under tension.
Buddy I've already done this test and have proven it is stronger they act as struts. not wheel spokes. struts simply hold or give support by the use of tension. when the wheel gets pulled one way there's tension on the opposite spoke and does not allow it to flex this post is old and has already been proven
 
this table right here has the same exact concept just engineered in a didferent manner. the 4 outside chains are not under tension until force is exerted on the oposite corner not allowing it to tip over but stay flat. Same structural support with my wheels
Screenshot_20240428_163316_Chrome.jpg
 
Everybody is an expert until they talk to an expert. I studied structural engineering not mechanical. Talk to me when you have a structural degree.
 
I will teach you why it works. It does not have to connect to the hub. Not owning a pair of these mags. you dont know how and where the flex. the wheels do not flex from the hub all the way to the outside of the rim. These rims dont start flexing until 4in off of the hub. The pic will explain. now in the pic both segments start and stop at the same 2 points. Which one has the longer segmented line A or B?
Screenshot_20240428_165804.jpg
 
so if you attached segment A to the left side of segment B and you put tension on A. It would then have Segment B flexing only have the distance. Because segment A has tension and wont flex. Thanks for learning today
 
Buddy I've already done this test and have proven it is stronger they act as struts. not wheel spokes. struts simply hold or give support by the use of tension. when the wheel gets pulled one way there's tension on the opposite spoke and does not allow it to flex this post is old and has already been proven
Yet the "structural expert" is using a wheel with wallowed out bearing lands. You cannot make this stuff up. :ROFLMAO:


So here's a challenge: You should take your built wheel and send it to Rolff Prima in Eugene OR and have them test it to destruction, they will do this for free. I have built multi thousands of wheels in both bike shops and in manufacturing and your supposed uber wheel has no side to side or radial loading triangulation.. Two really important design factors in what makes a wheel that will not collapse at speed. The graph you presented has no indications of what amount of forces are being applied and which direction. There's an old term here, GIGO.
 
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