Planning on a long bike tour

ThePhantom

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#41
Gilad --

Apologies if this post strays from the topic of parts to carry, but the touring info. seems germane and may give you some food for thought.

I have ridden all over the country on motorcycles, but a moped was just miserable, and I think a bicycle would be even worse. Still, it can be done.
Yes, it certainly can, and thousands of touring cyclists have crossed the US (on just pedal bikes) and loved it. My own tour was exhilarating, and one of the best experiences of my life. Yes, there were some down days, but the good days far outnumbered them. I'm not trying to deny or discredit your experience, just offering some counterpoint.

okay, so I did a long crazy ebike ride today. total 130 miles . . . 1000 feet gain.
Wow, that's impressive! But 1,000 feet change over 130 miles averages out to less than 10 feet elevation change per mile. Your roads must be flat as a pancake!

1. My older iPhone ran out of power . . .

2. . . . i literally had to check my phone constantly and ran out of batteries

3. . . . have a spare battery that is always full to charge your phone.
Printed maps are old-school, but they work without batteries or network access! Just another option to consider.

Adventure Cycling (https://www.adventurecycling.org/cyclosource-store/route-maps/) makes some great maps. They're waterproof and have turn-for-turn instructions in miles and kilometers. They generally follow bicycle-friendly roads, with campgrounds, motels, grocery stores and bike shops listed along the way. Another option is AAA roadmaps. They're free if you're a member. Designed for cars, yes, but they also indicate campgrounds (just look for the little red tee-pee icon), have lots of detail and show secondary/tertiary roads that cyclists prefer.

4. Since I was so late, it got dark. You do not want to ride in the pitch black.
No, never! Just like a patch kit, I always carry a bright headlight -- but hope I never have to use it.

Glad you made it home safe and sound!
 
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bakaneko

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#42
Gilad --

Wow, that's impressive! But 1,000 feet change over 130 miles averages out to less than 10 feet elevation change per mile. Your roads must be flat as a pancake!
That is the midwest for ya. This was also off of Google Maps but I would say it was accurate. The weather was literally perfect yesterday for riding mid 60s (17c), cloudy, and a very light tail wind. I did about 15-17 mph (20 kmh) average on the way there and it was a breeze. On the way back, I started cramping and had pains then it started raining and the wind really picked up. I had to stop two times to sit and let my legs stabilize.

Yea, I agree long distance riding and touring is a joy. Though if not planned correctly can be a nightmare. That road I went on yesterday was a nice road compared to others I've been on with more aggressive hills. I also like to ride on the shoulder paint strip line. Man, I swear that gives you an extra 1-2 mph.

The touring insight is important. I mean the OP is going on a tour and his progress and tribulations will be close though not as difficult as a cyclist. I dont understand how those touring guys can go around 100 miles a day. My bike is heavy Walmart "mountain" bike with a 500W motor so should weigh probably close to a good touring bike with gear. It's insane to do this day in, day out.
 

FurryOnTheInside

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#43
A lot of the phone's battery power is used searching for a signal where there is none. Always turn off the internet and/or switch to airplane mode.
If you have a spare phone with no SIM in it you can take photos of your paper maps before you go, or use Bluetooth to put screenshots of Google maps on it from your other phone.
You can cut up your paper maps and laminate the pieces if you are expecting to get very wet.
I actually like written directions as they're smaller than a map, or can be carried alongside the other things. Use the odometer on your cycle computer and the list of directions so that you only get the maps or phone out when you get a bit lost. :)

Carry ibuprofen for achy joints, paracetamol for dehydration headaches, metronidazole for bacterial infections, and antacids for the heartburn you get from eating instant noodles and being bent over for days. ;)

Saddle sores have three causes.. pressure, chafing and bacteria. One type of sore can lead to another. You will get sores later if you have a hard butt from lots of practice rides.
I like to carry the chlorhexidine gluconate wound wash in case of grazes, but a quick spray of the intimate region every morning really helps keep the level of skin bacteria low. However you still must be very careful in summer to change and wash cycling shorts at least daily and dry them on the rear panniers or the trailer. Use releasable cable ties to attach them. :)
 
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FurryOnTheInside

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#45
They have a support drone following them ;-}
I think it's just that they don't intend on/ carry anything for doing activities other than cycling, and they sleep in B&B's so no need for camping equipment, fishing rods and all that stuff that makes a real cycling vacation fun. :rolleyes:
Plus being fitter (in the right way for cycling) of course. I am sure some can do 200 miles in a day, but I don't think they do that for a week lol.

My record for a day is 85 miles, and that was with winter camping stuff (-14°C) so too much clothing, bottle of gin etc lol.
It f'ing hurt. :confused:
haha
 

bakaneko

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#46
They have a support drone following them ;-}
Yeah, nice joke. There are guys that are hardcore and can do this day in day out for months to cross the country. I think my training is near that level. But, camping in the ditch or woods each night I am not so sure...
 

FurryOnTheInside

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#47
camping in the ditch or woods each night
Oh, luxurious accommodation! Try sleeping sitting on the toilet in the "disabled" public restroom haha. At least there's room to bring your bike inside, that's good.
Photo booths can be quite an experience too although nowhere to put your bike. :D
 

KCvale

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#48
Oh, luxurious accommodation! Try sleeping sitting on the toilet in the "disabled" public restroom haha. At least there's room to bring your bike inside, that's good.
Photo booths can be quite an experience too although nowhere to put your bike. :D
Naw, not my kinda thing.
I liked lake camping, just pack everything in the boat.
 
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#49
Hi.
So I finally decided to buy 49CC 4 stroke motorized bicycle with HuaSheng engine and planning to ride from California to South Dakota. (I Know those bikes are not ment for this but that a challenge I'm willing to take)

My question for you guys is as following:
What spare parts are essentials to take with me in my journey?
If it was a 2 stroke I would say take a spare engine in a baby trailer tow behind.
If you have the money for motels along the way you can drop your sleeping bags and tent bugs rain wind. I take a tool bag. Spokes if you don't have mag rims your luggage somewhere along the way gonna tangle break them.
Spare nuts and bolts that fit mounting assembly or lock tight the hell out of them. What I found out taking long trips little things that you pick up locally are impossible in rural areas 85 miles one way to an auto parts store 40 miles to the one you just came from no Home Deptos or any parts place for miles and miles. A solar charger for cell phone with a good service carrier there's no wifi out in the sticks.
 

KCvale

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#51
Hi.
So I finally decided to buy 49CC 4 stroke motorized bicycle with HuaSheng engine and planning to ride from California to South Dakota. (I Know those bikes are not ment for this but that a challenge I'm willing to take)

My question for you guys is as following:
What spare parts are essentials to take with me in my journey?
Does your 4-stoke have a Grubee T-belt 4G transfer case?
If not pay for the airfare or take a 4G along because the transfer cases gasbike, kings, etc include are junk ;-}
 
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