premature bevel gear wear - what's causing it?

When something is over stressed then replaced with a strengthened part, the next weaker thing down the line is the next to go.

Even if both gears are the same hardness the smaller one will wear out first. The reason being is there's 82t in the large one and 20t in the small one. So the smaller one's teeth are being used 4.1 more times than the larger one.

The cause of the wear is due to excessive stress being put on it. For example: such things as using something like a 36t rear sprocket while trying to climb steep hills. Things like not using enough pedal assist on take offs etc.
maybe, i don't stress it all that much though. i run a 44t and i kinda putt around. i noticed the wear less than 50 miles in.
 
This pic is a little out of focus and closer in would have been nice. Am I seeing this..........it appears to me that the teeth are not making total conatct, like only half a tooth. Not much you can do about something like this.
yea it's hard to say, the big gear ate the teeth off of the little one so they aren't meshed in that pic, the little gear can just about spin freely, so that wear level is just about the depth of where the two engage.

i like diesel tech's suggestion, i'm gonna check the clutch basket for runout once i get the new gears in the mail.
 
maybe, i don't stress it all that much though. i run a 44t and i kinda putt around. i noticed the wear less than 50 miles in.
Even a 44t can put stress on a gear climbing a really steep hill; one should always pedal assist on take offs, last of all engine braking going down hill is another bad thing.

The small gear is probably purposely designed to be the weak sheer point. This way if over stressed it's simply a matter of replacing a gear instead of an engine being destroyed.
 
Even a 44t can put stress on a gear climbing a really steep hill; one should always pedal assist on take offs, last of all engine braking going down hill is another bad thing.

The small gear is probably purposely designed to be the weak sheer point. This way if over stressed it's simply a matter of replacing a gear instead of an engine being destroyed.
yea that would make sense. the gear isn't hard to change out.

i find it hard not to pedal start even on a 44t, the slowest speed i can usually get it to turn over is 7mph and 10mph is its comfortable slowest speed

anywho. this should hopefully have me covered for several thousand miles!
 

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well, after inspection i think diesel tech's theory holds the most water still. here's a video of the clutch wibble wobbling around


i got her rideable, i guess i'll get a clutch kit ready for the next time i get an eaten gear
 
well, after inspection i think diesel tech's theory holds the most water still. here's a video of the clutch wibble wobbling around


i got her rideable, i guess i'll get a clutch kit ready for the next time i get an eaten gear

Not the best of videos. However, especially if you're a large person like several others and I here are and If you have steep hills to contend with; be sure to pedal assist. Get a tachometer if at full throttle your engine rpm is dropping below 4000 rpm you need to provide more pedal assist to bring it up to at least 5000 rpm.
 
i guess i'll get a clutch kit ready for the next time i get an eaten gear
It's too bad you didn't keep the camera on both gears meshed and turning as it is running so we could look for anything that could have helped with diagnosis of the problem, instead you aimed your camera through the frame of the bike for a view of your tools and miscellaneous stuff strewn across your floor so we did not get any view of that whatsoever.
 
In the first clip, I wasn't pointing at the meshing or attempting to. I was pointing at the clutch basket gear, showing that it's not concentric. In the second clip, I was showing that the clutch gear was wobbling back and forth laterally while the clutch lever was pulled.
 
In the first clip, I wasn't pointing at the meshing or attempting to. I was pointing at the clutch basket gear, showing that it's not concentric. In the second clip, I was showing that the clutch gear was wobbling back and forth laterally while the clutch lever was pulled.
There is always a little non-concentric movement in these gears, that is why it was important to see them working together with each other under power.
 
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