preventing power loss

Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
57
I was talking about the main clutch bearings. The bloke in the video wanted metal shields on his clutch bearings, not on his crank bearings. The ZZ in the product code means it does have two metal seals. The single side sealed bearings are not so common. The both sides sealed ones are common.
Oh ok I gotcha my bad. I thought he was talking about the crankcase bearings. because that would only make sense. Lol I would like to see his face when he gets a letter from his distributer that says he can do all those upgrades no problem but the cost of each motor is going to be 100 dollars more.
 
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Will'smotobikes19

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Apr 9, 2018
Messages
1,653
Technically wouldn’t it work with neither seals on the mains? There are already rubber seals with springs that go over the shaft. If you take apart a dirt bike motor there isn’t any seals on the actual bearing. Neighbor thinks you leave the inner seal facing the crank on “facepalm”.
 

mrbg

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Joined
Sep 22, 2014
Messages
241
I was talking about the main clutch bearings. The bloke in the video wanted metal shields on his clutch bearings, not on his crank bearings. The ZZ in the product code means it does have two metal seals. The single side sealed bearings are not so common. The both sides sealed ones are common.
 

FurryOnTheInside

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Sep 23, 2013
Messages
3,675
You've quoted me and not replied lol. 🤨

I think I want rubber seals on my clutch shaft bearings rather than metal shields.
I'm not sure I can be bothered changing them at all, though. I don't expect any of them will be free of drag when the clutch is pulled. The clutch shaft bearings aren't isolated from the axial load when the bucking bar is pushed in, as far as I can see, and higher quality bearing won't like that either.
 

mrbg

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Joined
Sep 22, 2014
Messages
241
I think there's some confusion Crank bearings shield on the outside only, clutch shaft bearings have shields on both sides
 

Robert41

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Jul 23, 2019
Messages
23
Almost every time I take mine apart I resurface the head and the cylinder mating surface and yet I still get leaks as is evident by the oil on the cylinder fins. A good design allows compensation for the mating surfaces to distort due to unequal heating (due to most of the heat at the exhaust side). I may make a head gasket out of fibrous gasket material. I've also toyed with the idea of grooving the head and cylinder to accept an o-ring. A lot of motocross engines have o-rings.
I have heard that if go to a auto parts store and get a 02sensor gastket for a 02 Toyota Highlander it fits perfectly and works great for the exhaust gasket and its cheaper
 
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