• Register now! It's free and easy.
  • Show your bike to the world, upload a photo today!
  • Hi Guest, did you know we have a dark style? It might be easier on the eyes at night time! Try it out here: Style Chooser

Rear hub - jack shaft

A

Alaskavan

Guest
Okay, the idea here is to get power to the rear cassette from the motor without interferring with pedaling. Use a rear hub for a jack shaft. Cut it in half, install a small gear on the inside of the right hand flange (my feeling is like 16t.) Weld the hub back together using some tubing to achieve the desired width. Attach a big gear (44t?) on the outside of the left hand side of the hub. Attach a freewheel with just one 16t gear on it on the right hand side. Cut a piece of thread stock to length as an axle to mount it.
Jack shaft_1.jpg

Sorry about the quality of the picture. It took me longer to uncover the scanner, than I took to draw the picture.

Oh yeah. I suppose you might want to start with a 5:1 reduction at the motor.

So cut me to shreds here. What am I forgetting/missing?

If you want to delve into the gear ratios, please keep in mind I'm looking towards a 20" wheel.
 


5

5-7HEAVEN

Guest
:cool:Alaska, what kind of bicycle and for what purpose?

do you intend to make full use of how many gears of your cassette?

how many teeth on the rear sprockets(cassette)?

which engine and rpm range are we shooting for?

you could copy ZOMBY'S jackset. weld another crankset hole in the frame and use that as a jackset housing with 5/8" jackshaft.

if you want to make good use of the rear cassette, you need gear reduction at the jackshaft.

that can be calculated when you tell us about the cassette's ratios.

using the gears you suggested would be too much. it'd be like happy time engine and 106-tooth rear sprocket. besides, that 44t sprocket would be the size of a radial sawblade spinning next to your calf.

if your useable cassette gears are 32t/27t/22t/18t, you could use a 12-tooth jackshaft sprocket(left-side) and 10-tooth jackshaft sprocket(right side).

gear ratios with 32t = 19.2:1, similar to happy time engine and 46t sprocket;
27t = 16.2:1..............................................39t sprocket;
22t = 13.2:1..............................................32t sprocket;
18t = 10.8:1..............................................26t sprocket.

if you MUST use the 16t freewheel gear on the right side of the jackshaft, the left-side sprocket needs to be changed to 18t gear. consequently,

gear ratios with 32t = 18.00:1, similar to happy time engine and 44t sprocket;
27t = 15.19:1..............................................37t sprocket;
22t = 12.38:1..............................................30t sprocket;
18t = 10.13:1..............................................24t sprocket.

calculations were verified at http://www.compgoparts.com/TechnicalResources/JackshaftRatioCalculator.asp



i don't think that rear hub will be strong enough for the task. you need stronger support, welded to the frame.

Myron
 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

Alaskavan

Guest
Application

This is the bike I'm getting.
1.jpg

The wheels are 20".
The rear cassette is 8-speed, 11 - 30t.
I'd like to use all the gears.
The basic use is a 26 - 30 mile commute. Each way. Some hills, not bad. I'll want to be able to tow a trailer with groceries.

I'm pretty happy with the Mitsu TLE 43 I have on my Trek. So I might use one on the trike. Max. RPM=8,300. Probably operate around 6.

Caveat: I intend to mount the engine behind the seat. I will probably have to cut and extend the frame. I might change to a larger wheel if I do that (I understand the impact on ratios).
 
Last edited by a moderator:
5

5-7HEAVEN

Guest
:cool:Okay Alaska, here's more numbers:

using 16t on the right side of the jackshaft, add a 22t sprocket on the engine-side. using arbitrary numbers on 11t-30t cassette, you'd have:

30t with 20.63:1, similar to happy time engine and 50t;
27t with 18.56:1,.............................................45t;
24t with 16.50:1,.............................................40t;
21t with 14.44:1..............................................35t;
18t with 12.38:1..............................................30t;
15t with 10.31:1..............................................25t;
11t with 7.56:1..............................................18t.

try these numbers for size.

Myron
 
L

Large Filipino

Guest
Freewheel crank.

(Sorry. I threw these pics out at another thread,but it's too cool)

Um,I don't see how your hub design is any different from a regular spoke mount design except it's connected to the hub. How does that design utilize gears?
 

Attachments

Last edited by a moderator:
5

5-7HEAVEN

Guest
:confused:Alaska, it doesn't seem like an easy bike to install an engine, using jackshaft to connect to original chain drive. STATON chain gear or friction drive would all seem more practical.

exactly where on the frame do you intend to install the jackshaft?

Myron
 
A

Alaskavan

Guest
Hi 5-7, It might not be easy, but it's one of those things. I got it in my mind to do it, so we'll see how it goes. The idea is to install the engine on the rail behind the seat. I'll probably have to do a bit of a stretch there. A lot of this is just in my head for the moment. The bike arrives in Fairbanks the first week of Oct., and I still have to figure out exactly how to get it here from there.

I must admit that the more I look at what I drew, the less enamored I am of it. I was just trying to find a way to do this that could be fabricated by an average guy (me)using easily available parts (the ones I have). It was perhaps one of those ideas that sound good, but don't really work. Maybe you know how it is. The idea seemed so good that, in my exuberance, I had to share it. And did so before taking a reasonable amount of time for reflection. I 'll let this idea ferment a bit more. It could turn out to be vinegar rather than wine. But ya never know.

In the mean time, I'll look at building a more conventional jack shaft.
Thanks for checking the gear ratios for me.
 
5

5-7HEAVEN

Guest
:cool:you're welcome, Alaska.

i share your feelings. i'm torn between buying a SCHWINN AEROSPORT and a SCHWINN SKYLINER. the AERO has balloon tires and retro frame, but doesn't have front suspension fork or front brakes. i don't want to buy the upgrades and spend too much.

i'll probably buy the SKYLINER, which has steel frame,suspension fork and front/rear brakes. the dealer's not gonna like it if i buy it from WALMART and have him service/repair, but he can't get the model i want.

all this is for my twin-engine project. now you have me thinking about utilizing the bike's 21-speed drivetrain.
 
L

Large Filipino

Guest
Freewheel crank. Engine....Happy time engine behind seat with some kind of fabricated mount. Jackshaft very similar to those pics I posted earlier. Crank is too far away from engine so leave the crank alone. Get two chain tensioners on on top and one below to sit just in front of your jackshaft, Solid sprocket in back,no ratchet.
The way I picture it,the chain will always be moving. Behind the seat the top chain going to the gears and the bottom chain going away from the gears will be met with the left sprocket of your jackshaft with the same number of teeth as your crank. Engine should turn this okay for the entire assembly is constantly turning.
I wish I had photoshop skills.

Wait. That black wheel that's under that seat that's making that chain cross over. Just lace the top chain to your jackshaft sprocket and get another black wheel like that and mount it just behind your jackshaft. Then lace your chain to go under the black wheel and over the top,then under your jackshaft sprocket and over the top to your gears.

Yes. That set up would most definetly work and still have pedal with little resistance.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Dockspa1

Guest
Van, I can apreciate what you are shooting for but, If it were I, I would go with the varidrive units and a belt to the jackshaft. Or the Torq-a-verter.
A lot less to brake down when you got a mama Kodiak on you butt@.
May the farce be with you ,either way!
Doc
 
Top