Rear Mount Engine Kits?

weefek

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Boy, not a lot of activity recently eh? That kinda sucks as it seems to me that friction drive systems should hold a lot of promise at least allowing what should be a little easier barrier to entry into the bike scene, but perhaps I am wrong.
Entry into the scene? How can you ignore a 69cc kit for 200$? Granted you need a separate chain tensioner ($20) but it's hard to beat. I spent maybe 30$ on my original friction drive BMX w/ a chainsaw motor back in the day, and it did what i needed it to but it didn't last long.
 

DAMIEN1307

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Boy, not a lot of activity recently eh? That kinda sucks as it seems to me that friction drive systems should hold a lot of promise at least allowing what should be a little easier barrier to entry into the bike scene, but perhaps I am wrong.
If you want activity for friction drive, do what I just did...Go to "Search Forums" at the top of the page and just type in "friction drive", and here are the results found in the link below starting with the most recent posts/threads on the subject...lol.

 

DAMIEN1307

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Granted you need a separate chain tensioner ($20) but it's hard to beat.
You don't even need a chain tensioner if your mechanically inclined...Just chop down the chains to length like I did on mine...See, No tensioner...lol.

IMG_0352.jpg
 

weefek

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You don't even need a chain tensioner if your mechanically inclined...Just chop down the chains to length like I did on mine...See, No tensioner...lol.

View attachment 175963
I've seen this previously and I wish I could. It just so happens chain lengths vs how far the rear wheel is from the engine and I need a chain tensioner. I've notice that it is 'stretching' over time maybe I will get to that point but as of now I needed a half link for it to work. Without a tensioner or half link there was so much slack that it would bind up near the motor sprocket. Also my frame is crap. It's a china welded probably on the streets POS so it is what it is.

For me personally on my frame there's no inbetween.
 

Chainlube

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Let's debunk this myth now, not all rear rack mounts are friction drives. There's several rear rack chain and belt drive systems. My rear rack mount even runs through a shift kit.View attachment 175970
The beauty about a rack mount is you can center it over the wheel and run a jack shaft. Then put the whole engine in a trunk.
 

Smallwheels

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I got an e-mail from Motoredbikes and this thread was mentioned. I read it. I used a motorized rack mount as my only motorized transportation for two years. The Golden Eagle was the first kit. The motor lasted the longest but the kit kept breaking spokes. That got expensive to fix. I hated dealing with that. Then the metal brace that held the engine cracked in half. It had to be replaced. Eventually I gave it up for a friction kit from Staton. With the one inch driver it lasted only a few months before the diamond pattern was just gone and the traction was much less. They don't work on rainy days even with diamond etching in the metal. The bearings wore out in those few months too.

Next I ordered a Chinese four stroke motor kit from some big retailer. It leaked oil from day one. It was exchanged. The second one leaked oil the same way and was returned. I spent over $110 on postage for defective motors. I got my $160+ back. I really liked the torque and lower noise even though it was slower.

Next I created my own rear rack mount using my original 32 cc Tanaka motor and a donut left sproket setup. It worked well but the mount was always twisting and needing adjustments. Then the shaft on that motor broke. A friend gave me a 2-stroke weed trimmer motor from Sears. It was fifteen to twenty years old. It worked. That was my last motor until I gave up using it.

I could have purchased a Honda Metropolitan or Ruckus for the money I kept pumping into my motorized bicycle in those two years and 8000 miles. There would have been less maintenance and frustration PLUS the scooter would probably still be running. The only benefits were no insurance and the bike could be carried upstairs and locked to the railing outside my apartment. It couldn't be kept inside because it stunk.

The price to build a motorized bicycle that would last for thousands of miles without lots of maintenance would cost more than a new Lazer 6 moped by SSR ($1599). I still have a Tanaka 32cc replacement clutch that I didn't get to use. Anybody want to buy it?

If I were to do it again, I would want it to be legal, meaning under 50ccs. I would want a Honda or Subaru four stroke engine, and some kind of chain drive on a rear double or triple wall wheel with spokes that would never break. I found a Schwinn frame that I like with front suspension and it costs $500 alone. Everything I've listed puts this over $1400 and there are still parts that I would want to add for comfort; like a suspension seat post and a better seat. Adding a drum front brake would get me over $2000. Honda sells the Navi 109cc motorcycle for only $1807. It goes 50 mph and would be a very reliable vehicle.

Maybe I just want my money to give me a better return when it comes to pricing vehicles. Gas N'Go with few problems. That is my ideal two wheel motor vehicle. Generally motor scooters that are treated well last 30,000 miles. Some people in Asia claim that their Honda Cub motors can last three times that many miles. Yamaha is in the electric bicycle market now. Some are selling for $3499. Uhhhh no. There are lots of options for reliable low cost low speed reliable transportation.
 

Sidewinder Jerry

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I got an e-mail from Motoredbikes and this thread was mentioned. I read it. I used a motorized rack mount as my only motorized transportation for two years. The Golden Eagle was the first kit. The motor lasted the longest but the kit kept breaking spokes. That got expensive to fix. I hated dealing with that. Then the metal brace that held the engine cracked in half. It had to be replaced. Eventually I gave it up for a friction kit from Staton. With the one inch driver it lasted only a few months before the diamond pattern was just gone and the traction was much less. They don't work on rainy days even with diamond etching in the metal. The bearings wore out in those few months too.

Next I ordered a Chinese four stroke motor kit from some big retailer. It leaked oil from day one. It was exchanged. The second one leaked oil the same way and was returned. I spent over $110 on postage for defective motors. I got my $160+ back. I really liked the torque and lower noise even though it was slower.

Next I created my own rear rack mount using my original 32 cc Tanaka motor and a donut left sproket setup. It worked well but the mount was always twisting and needing adjustments. Then the shaft on that motor broke. A friend gave me a 2-stroke weed trimmer motor from Sears. It was fifteen to twenty years old. It worked. That was my last motor until I gave up using it.

I could have purchased a Honda Metropolitan or Ruckus for the money I kept pumping into my motorized bicycle in those two years and 8000 miles. There would have been less maintenance and frustration PLUS the scooter would probably still be running. The only benefits were no insurance and the bike could be carried upstairs and locked to the railing outside my apartment. It couldn't be kept inside because it stunk.

The price to build a motorized bicycle that would last for thousands of miles without lots of maintenance would cost more than a new Lazer 6 moped by SSR ($1599). I still have a Tanaka 32cc replacement clutch that I didn't get to use. Anybody want to buy it?

If I were to do it again, I would want it to be legal, meaning under 50ccs. I would want a Honda or Subaru four stroke engine, and some kind of chain drive on a rear double or triple wall wheel with spokes that would never break. I found a Schwinn frame that I like with front suspension and it costs $500 alone. Everything I've listed puts this over $1400 and there are still parts that I would want to add for comfort; like a suspension seat post and a better seat. Adding a drum front brake would get me over $2000. Honda sells the Navi 109cc motorcycle for only $1807. It goes 50 mph and would be a very reliable vehicle.

Maybe I just want my money to give me a better return when it comes to pricing vehicles. Gas N'Go with few problems. That is my ideal two wheel motor vehicle. Generally motor scooters that are treated well last 30,000 miles. Some people in Asia claim that their Honda Cub motors can last three times that many miles. Yamaha is in the electric bicycle market now. Some are selling for $3499. Uhhhh no. There are lots of options for reliable low cost low speed reliable transportation.
My set up is on its second bike. It has lasted more than 12 years
 

darwin

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This thread is from 2007 FYI. Small Wheels, don't want to disagree with your experience in using the Staton kit but something doesn't add up. Yes the rollers do wear, when the center gets smooth it still functions properly. Just add a lil more pressure to the tire/roller. I've had good use out of my kits. They're so simple and sturdy it's hard to improve upon. With the GX50cc it's as good as a FD can get and be legal. Not sure what I'm trying to say but hope you'd reconsider FD's. Also your cost comparisons don't add up. Bike with kit 45lbs, scooter 250lbs. Nice used bicycle $100, motor and I'm using a new GX50 ie. $320, Staton kit $140 shipped = $560. Yes the added accessories add up, mine has $1200 total invested and it's by my choice. Scooters are not bicycles. You can't ride a scooter just anywhere like a bicycle, just my view. Good luck bro!
 

oldfurr

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Small Wheels are you sure in was a Staton inc. kit you had? I've shopped for and used Staton friction drive kits for about a decade and never seen a diamond pattern roller sold by him or had anything like the fast roller wear you describe nor had a problem hitting the quick release lever and dropping the rack a fraction of an inch and continuing through rain mud etc. What you describe really does not sound like the Staton friction drive.
EDIT: And I went rabbithole hunting and found several pre-2002 Staton / Honda gx31 build photos that do show a knurled drive roller as well as 2 early GX35 builds on Staton's website that show knurled drive rollers. So there is that...
3195-3 knroll.jpg
 
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