Rear Wheel Hub Bearing heat

gearhead437

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Dear Fellow Gearheads,
My second build is a 66cc Hyper Cruiser with 46 miles on the odo. I installed a high quality rim brake on the front to assist the coaster brakes. After noticing that the rear hub was warm to the touch, I also noticed that rotating the rear wheel with the clutch disengaged caused the pedals to rotate. I knew that this meant that the rear wheel cone bearings were a tad tight. I removed the wheel from both chains and loosened the bearings until there was a little felt play. I then retightened them until the pedal sprocket started catching again and then loosened a quarter turn before reinstalling the wheel and applying torque to the outer retaining nut. Now rotating the rear wheel with the clutch disengaged does not rotate the pedals via the chain. However, the rear hub is still warm to the touch. After 15 minutes or so, the hub cooled back to ambient temperature. I am still breaking in the motor, did not exceed 15mph and traveled about 1-2 miles. All of the bearings were cleaned and repacked with Park grease by the local bike shop before the motor was installed. When properly adjusted, do these rear hubs heat up at all? I realize that cone bearings are not the best design, and that these cruiser bikes are pretty inexpensive. Thank you in advance for any adjustment info:)-Gearhead222
 
Dear Fellow Gearheads,
My second build is a 66cc Hyper Cruiser with 46 miles on the odo. I installed a high quality rim brake on the front to assist the coaster brakes. After noticing that the rear hub was warm to the touch, I also noticed that rotating the rear wheel with the clutch disengaged caused the pedals to rotate. I knew that this meant that the rear wheel cone bearings were a tad tight. I removed the wheel from both chains and loosened the bearings until there was a little felt play. I then retightened them until the pedal sprocket started catching again and then loosened a quarter turn before reinstalling the wheel and applying torque to the outer retaining nut. Now rotating the rear wheel with the clutch disengaged does not rotate the pedals via the chain. However, the rear hub is still warm to the touch. After 15 minutes or so, the hub cooled back to ambient temperature. I am still breaking in the motor, did not exceed 15mph and traveled about 1-2 miles. All of the bearings were cleaned and repacked with Park grease by the local bike shop before the motor was installed. When properly adjusted, do these rear hubs heat up at all? I realize that cone bearings are not the best design, and that these cruiser bikes are pretty inexpensive. Thank you in advance for any adjustment info:)-Gearhead222
I wish adjustment info would actually be of any help to you but from everything I have either experienced myself or seen others go through once the bike is motorised, the rear coaster brake and hub is doomed to failure because it was never designed to go 3 to 4 times the pedal speed of around 10 MPH it was originally designed for.

That is one of many reasons why I went to mag wheels with sealed bearings and with disk brakes on my Hyper beach cruiser as I only do street riding in my old age now, the Hyper frames are great but the wheels are total brick and mortar store-bought crap for any motorised bike use whatsoever.
 
My guess is lack of grease from the bike shop, as well as the grease not being of high temp.
But yes. As mentioned. Loose the coaster brake.
 
It has lots of grease. While adjusting, I can hear it when the bearing set is a tad loose on one side, when the ball bearing cage separates slightly from the cup.Will just have to loosen more about 1/4 turn and see what happens-Gearhead222
 
Did you inspect the bearings or races for damage?
Do you have any picture from when you did the coaster brake?
No need...Just from what he is saying, it will not be very long at all before it either grenades or goes into a total seize up with locked up back wheel and lots of damage to show for it.

Ps...Not to mention the possible damage to the rider as well.
 
Here's your least expensive safe option. Get a double walled rim with a freewheel hub, get a cro-molly axle, then get a single speed freewheel. Last of all install rear rim brakes.
 
We'll see now, won't we? GW's motorized, this is a brand new bike that was cleaned and regreased at the bike shop using Park Hi Temp bearing grease. They replaced the crank bearings with a cassette set:) BTW, it would be interesting to see what other people say about rear coaster brake hub warmth. I've already priced a quality double wall rim at the shop, but it was completely stripped and would have required painting. Never checked the 49cc rear hub for heat, but it had over 1000 miles on it before it was stolen. I would have installed a rear brake, but there no gussetted hole in the rear cross tube like there was on my Canebrook Beach Cruiser-Gearhead437
 
We'll see now, won't we? GW's motorized, this is a brand new bike that was cleaned and regreased at the bike shop using Park Hi Temp bearing grease. They replaced the crank bearings with a cassette set:) BTW, it would be interesting to see what other people say about rear coaster brake hub warmth. That is what I am trying to guage, not prophecies of doom and gloom.-Gearhead437
All you have to do is research this forum; it has plenty of coaster brake failure stories. It isn't prophecies of gloom and doom; it's a warning about history repeating itself.

We're all born ignorant

A fool never learns from their mistakes

A smart person learns from their mistakes

The wise learns from the mistakes of others
 
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