RIP motor bike

Yikes, I guess the handiness gene skips a generation. His dad was a nuclear physicist, but his son can't screw in a lightbulb.
Too funny...My father in law was a college professor at SMU...he knew just enough to be dangerous...lol...One night, he announces to one and all after having dinner that he was going out to "fix" his Saab as he has a screw driver in his hand...He reminded me of Don Quixote, launching forth to do battle with windmills...lol...lol.

Needless to say, mother in law asked me to go out and save him from himself as he was utterly clueless with anything mechanical, let alone be able to fix it...lol.
 
If you had to rely on one of these things, I imagine you could if you got a high quality kit, installed it with the utmost care and don't go past 3/4 RPM and don't romp on the clutch, but even then luck seems to play a huge part.

I'm new to the hobby and discovered that there really aren't too many high quality pieces out there, I've been looking for high quality stuff so I don't have to tinker on it on my days off, and unfortunately it seems like everything is like playing the lottery, sometimes a piece is well made, but usually it's poo wrapped in cellophane.

Heck, I just got a belt kit and I have to buy bearing spacers so the idler can roll and Dremel some nasty dents off the sprocket!

It's probably one of those things that once you get a bike reliable, you do not mess with it, just keep it maintained.

Electric bikes are going to be inherently more reliable, but they are way overpriced, offer less speed, less range, and the battery packs themselves cost 2-3X more than a decent engine, plus, they simply aren't nearly as much fun.
Reliable is also an extremely broad term around here. The quality of the engine, wheels, frame, etc. all come into play.

Engine reliability is honestly the easiest part of the entire deal. Price of the kit can somewhat play a role, but the reality is that even the better kits still tend to suffer from the same quality problems the cheap ones do. Poorly installed bearings, untrue cranks (usually pinched during assembly), loose or tight tolerances, machining swarf (metal particulates) in the crankcase, poor cylinder plating, etc.

Most of the issues can be resolved by a person taking the time to go through the engine and having the ability and tools to do some of the work. Some of it, not so much - IE: poor plating quality.

Most reliability problems that people tend to experience come down to a lack of attention to things like fasteners or just low quality materials. This is especially true on the ancillary bits that come with the motor, like the tin foil thickness fuel tanks filled with paint and metal chips that like to tear off at the studs and leak from the fill cap, cheap electrical components, and even the spark plugs they come with.


As for the electric bikes... that really depends on a lot of factors too. Yes, bespoke electric bikes with frames and batteries built for the purpose that have integrated electronics start getting pricey quick. That said, bespoke gas bike frames with good quality components like Gemini wheels and proper brakes, etc. can easily crest a thousand dollars too before even adding an engine into the equation, which can range from 100 dollar ebay kits to custom minarelli or saw hybrids that cost several hundreds or more.

One can also build an ebike. The more you know how to do, the cheaper it becomes. I can put together a 1500w electric hub e-bike more than capable of going the same speeds and range as a typical gas bike build for close to about the same as a good quality 2 stroke build.
 
If you had to rely on one of these things, I imagine you could if you got a high quality kit, installed it with the utmost care and don't go past 3/4 RPM and don't romp on the clutch, but even then luck seems to play a huge part.

I'm new to the hobby and discovered that there really aren't too many high quality pieces out there, I've been looking for high quality stuff so I don't have to tinker on it on my days off, and unfortunately it seems like everything is like playing the lottery, sometimes a piece is well made, but usually it's poo wrapped in cellophane.

Heck, I just got a belt kit and I have to buy bearing spacers so the idler can roll and Dremel some nasty dents off the sprocket!

It's probably one of those things that once you get a bike reliable, you do not mess with it, just keep it maintained.

Electric bikes are going to be inherently more reliable, but they are way overpriced, offer less speed, less range, and the battery packs themselves cost 2-3X more than a decent engine, plus, they simply aren't nearly as much fun.


Also, running a 2stroke with no oil is the kiss of death, I watched my father kill a 20 year old snowblower in 5 minutes because he didn't listen when I told him to put oil in the gas.
The main part I see causing issues with these bikes is usually wheels (aside from clutch, carb, and no spark)
He didn't learn anything! I was 12 at the time and blamed me for using it a week prior (with mixed gas) pissed me off because I inherited it from my Grandpa.

But we are also talking about the same kind of person that blames a "crappy Ford engine" for cracking the block because he ran it dry-block for 200miles.
My dad had blamed me on so many things breaking. My favorite (as in the biggest example) was when his brand new dryer went out a week after warranty. The controll board was fried. He blamed it on things washed in my pockets, which none were in the dryer.
Similar story with my step-father, I get called one night at 2 AM from my mother to go rescue him of the Mass. Turnpike as his Ford Escort died on him.

I get there and find his motor is seized up tight...I check his dipstick and there is zero oil...I then looked at his oil change sticker on the window and saw his last oil change was overdue by 12,000 miles, of course he hadn't added any oil in all that time either.

I had asked him how long the red light on his dashboard was lit for, he said about a month...He did not know the oil can symbol meant to check the oil...lol.

All he said was, "it was running just fine up til now, what a POS these Fords are"...lol...lol.

This was the same man that when he died in 1990, my mother asked me to clean out the garage where I found 7 lawnmowers, none of which were running...He didn't know that things like sparkplugs and airfilters, fuel filters, etc needed to be replace periodically...lol...lol.

I did the maintanence needed to all of them and was able to sell them off for her...She was livid that they had to shell out money for new lawnmowers every two years...All due to lack of maintenance, he thought things just worked or they didn't...lol.
Funny enough my uncle has destroyed 2 cars by not adding oil, and adding too much oil. The one he ran dry was a Chevy HHR, the dipstick was dry long enough it started to rust. The one he over filled was a Chevy avalanche which he put 17 quarts of oil in a car that takes 7.
 
The main part I see causing issues with these bikes is usually wheels (aside from clutch, carb, and no spark)

My dad had blamed me on so many things breaking. My favorite (as in the biggest example) was when his brand new dryer went out a week after warranty. The controll board was fried. He blamed it on things washed in my pockets, which none were in the dryer.

Funny enough my uncle has destroyed 2 cars by not adding oil, and adding too much oil. The one he ran dry was a Chevy HHR, the dipstick was dry long enough it started to rust. The one he over filled was a Chevy avalanche which he put 17 quarts of oil in a car that takes 7.
I once had the pleasure of doing an oil change on a 5ish year old kia, that hadn't had an oil change for about 30k miles (if I remember right).

Only reason the guy brought it to the shop, was the engine was making a funny noise.

the oil was almost the texture of applesauce

a little while later, that car died. surprise surprise...lol
 
I once had the pleasure of doing an oil change on a 5ish year old kia, that hadn't had an oil change for about 30,000k miles (if I remember right).

Only reason the guy brought it to the shop, was the engine was making a funny noise.

the oil was almost the texture of applesauce

a little while later, that car died. surprise surprise...lol
Most likely a "sinchya" too.
 
One can also build an ebike. The more you know how to do, the cheaper it becomes. I can put together a 1500w electric hub e-bike more than capable of going the same speeds and range as a typical gas bike build for close to about the same as a good quality 2 stroke build.

I built a 500W E-bike once- found a 24V electric motor on the side of the road during a road-call, got a garbage picked panama Jack cruiser, a heavy-duty light switch, some U-bolts, a 2X4 a bump-box wheel and a couple 10,000mah 4s lipos I bought on clearance.

It did 20mph and then my chain fell off and I had to ruin my shoes to stop.

E-bike batteries are stupid expensive, but you can make a cell with a little knowledge for cheaper (but you are still spending good money).
 
I built a 500W E-bike once- found a 24V electric motor on the side of the road during a road-call, got a garbage picked panama Jack cruiser, a heavy-duty light switch, some U-bolts, a 2X4 a bump-box wheel and a couple 10,000mah 4s lipos I bought on clearance.

It did 20mph and then my chain fell off and I had to ruin my shoes to stop.

E-bike batteries are stupid expensive, but you can make a cell with a little knowledge for cheaper (but you are still spending good money).
I have built my fair share of battery packs. Most of the cost is in the labor. If you know what you are doing and already have the appropriate tools you can usually build a pack yourself for at least half the cost of a commercially available one.
 
Back
Top