still cant figure out the specs on my motor

oliveclown

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Jul 12, 2008
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its a craftsman chainsaw, 12", 2hp (I suppose), model # 358-352060. The only things I could find online was the owners manual with parts explosions/numbers and that the "358-" designates it might be a copycat from Poulan, but trying to cross reference part numbers didn't get me anywhere, so thats all I got. :cry: Just looking for the cc's and peak hp/rpm.

Also, as a side question, this chainsaw has a centrifugal clutch of course, but its on the very outside of the shaft. So I dont know how to easily get a sprocket on there for a chain drive. weld it on the drum? lol. Ive never torn one apart and im not sure how to approach it as far as finding a home for the engine sprocket. is there a easy way to tear the clutch off. okay thats it for me, once i figure there two things out i can really get moving with this project. hoping to have her ready soon cuz my transmissions slipping good now and i dont even have the funds for a picknpull. so its soon time to retire the jeep! Thanks fellas!
 

autobo7

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Apr 11, 2008
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Most chain saws already have a sprocket attached to them to move the chain. I would guess you can pretty much just remove the chain guide and saw chain and feed the bike chain into where the blade was. They are a pretty perfect fit for this application, i would guess it is less than 50ccs. Most small ones are in the 25-35cc range, so a big wheel sprocket would help to keep from burning clutch
 

oliveclown

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Jul 12, 2008
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the teeth are too wide on the chainsaw sprocket. Ill rip the chain off the bike to make absolutely sure it wont work. i just sortof wiggled the motor on the bike with the chain attached, but it was a no go. the more I look at it the more I just want to get a sprocket and weld er on the drum. Oooo, maybe put some kind of mount on the drum so I can swap with different sprockets. Ill try to get that clutch off tomorrow and see how that goes first maybe. But thanks for your insight autobo7.
 
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Nuttsy

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Jun 19, 2008
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Depending on the age of the machine, Sears Parts Dept. may have the info you seek. Try contacting them with your numbers.
Another option would be if you have access to calipers. You could remove the head and do some measurements and math. That would get you precise CC's. But as stated above, it's gonna be in the smaller range for a 12" saw.
 

oliveclown

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Jul 12, 2008
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yeah im sure its mid-20s to mid-30s. ill check with those guys. I probably wont pull the head just to measure cc's. I mean I know I'm "legal" but I was mainly just curious and thought it would help with the gearing. I don't think I have to know exactly, right? Thanks Nuttsy!
 

Nuttsy

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Jun 19, 2008
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As far as gearing goes, the figures depend more on RPM, wheel size, and drive and final gears. Of course HP figures in too when you add up your weights, and hill climbing ability. I guess size does matter :)
 

oliveclown

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Jul 12, 2008
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Well sears parts dept. was useless. Way too old of a machine for their records. But I may have figured out the cc's myself. I thought the 2.0 on the saw was for hp, but apparently its for cu in. Duh. So that equates to aboot 32cc's. The guy said he would have no way of finding the peak rpms. So I don't know what to do now. Guess? Think 13000 sounds good? I mean, what would you fellas do at this point?
 

Bronzebird

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Aug 7, 2008
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84
find a local chain saw repair shop

Well sears parts dept. was useless. Way too old of a machine for their records. But I may have figured out the cc's myself. I thought the 2.0 on the saw was for hp, but apparently its for cu in. Duh. So that equates to aboot 32cc's. The guy said he would have no way of finding the peak rpms. So I don't know what to do now. Guess? Think 13000 sounds good? I mean, what would you fellas do at this point?

Those guys can take a look at it and tell you how much of a load and rpm range will work. Then crunch out the numbers for weight to gear ratios.
 

machiasmort

Active Member
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Aug 6, 2008
Messages
774
Check the motor itself

engine should have a tag on it identifying model/spec. Look on the engine itself. I've got a book here and might be able to help you. The number you posted is a craftsman tool number not the motor info.
 
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