sturmey archer 3 speed --how does it handle power

kinsler33

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Jun 15, 2018
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The only failure of an SA three speed I ever experienced was when the central (or 'sun') gear broke, presumably because the rivet that pins it to the axle was loose and finally wore out. So when you tear down the hub for inspection (and you should) this is one area you'll want to check.

Mark Kinsler
 


Herman Klutz

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Dec 25, 2016
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I like cannonball2 idea with that. I ordered one of those carbs after reading through the thread. Waiting on delivery to figure out how I will fit it.
He gave enough info in the thread to make a manifold to get it connected and a how to on the air cleaner that was made from a pellet container. Another option that I believe will work is to sand cast his version and make a one piece manifold out of pewter.
 

kinsler33

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Jun 15, 2018
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Pewter. That's interesting. I don't know how strong that stuff actually is.

If you're restricted to low-temperature casting, it might be helpful to visit your nearest high-quality metal scrap yard and see if they have any zinc die-casting alloy. These guys know metals rather well and can likely give you hints on melting temperatures and such. Most die-casting today is done with aluminum, but that requires a crucible that can withstand a fairly violent furnace.

Having said that, I can attest that it's fun to melt aluminum: dig a 12" hole in the ground, bury a pipe so that it slants down into the bottom of that hole, fill the hole with charcoal from the grocery store, dump in some crumpled newspaper and maybe charcoal lighter, add a match, wait a few minutes for the charcoal to catch, and then apply an old hair dryer to the pipe (you can attach it to the pipe with duct tape for an added touch of elegance.)

When the air from the hair dryer (set it on 'cold') reaches the smoldering charcoal interesting things start to happen: red flames issue from the ground, and the roar of the fire will keep the neighbors from ever bothering you again. Smoke issues from cracks in the soil near the hole.

Do not use the family barbecue grill for this sort of thing, for it will essentially burn up.

The crucible can be a piece of iron pipe closed at one end: feed it crushed aluminum cans and other aluminum scrap. Molten aluminum doesn't glow brightly, so caution is advised. Borrow a tablet of swimming-pool chlorine and dump it into the melt to purge dissolved gases and thus eliminate bubbles, and pour your casting.

You will never look at an aluminum shower stall or screen door the same way again.

M Kinsler
 

LewieBike

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Joined
May 21, 2014
Messages
454
I like cannonball2 idea with that. I ordered one of those carbs after reading through the thread. Waiting on delivery to figure out how I will fit it.
A lot of additional fabrication to make the pumper carb fit. The interface between the carb face and the clamp on spigot, will be a challenge I found with my PW50 carb adaption that my aircleaner space was tiny
 

LewieBike

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Joined
May 21, 2014
Messages
454
The only failure of an SA three speed I ever experienced was when the central (or 'sun') gear broke, presumably because the rivet that pins it to the axle was loose and finally wore out. So when you tear down the hub for inspection (and you should) this is one area you'll want to check.

Mark Kinsler
The 3 speed hub they're referring to is a new design and has a much different axle than the old AW3 hub, especially the old AW's which have that rivet.
 

kinsler33

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Joined
Jun 15, 2018
Messages
13
"The 3 speed hub they're referring to is a new design and has a much different axle than the old AW3 hub, especially the old AW's which have that rivet. "

Ah. That one was likely from 1970. The one I took off my Schwinn was actually a German copy from the early 1950's. I rebuilt the wheel with 14 gauge spokes and a coaster brake. Even with a 49cc engine on it, that overweight Schwinn and its overweight rider can go a lot faster than you really want to go on a bicycle, at least when you're as old as I am.

Mark Kinsler
 

LewieBike

Active Member
Joined
May 21, 2014
Messages
454
"The 3 speed hub they're referring to is a new design and has a much different axle than the old AW3 hub, especially the old AW's which have that rivet. "

Ah. That one was likely from 1970. The one I took off my Schwinn was actually a German copy from the early 1950's. I rebuilt the wheel with 14 gauge spokes and a coaster brake. Even with a 49cc engine on it, that overweight Schwinn and its overweight rider can go a lot faster than you really want to go on a bicycle, at least when you're as old as I am.

Mark Kinsler
No It's actually from about 2012, it's a completely new design that owes nothing to the old AW3, which runs it's sun, ring and planet gears as under, direct and over driven. IIRC the new Sturmey Archers are direct drive from first gear and over driven by split suns with stepped planet gears. Supposedly stronger construction, less chance of slipping and gets rid of that false neutral between 2nd and 3rd.
 

Will'smotobikes19

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2018
Messages
1,356
Pewter. That's interesting. I don't know how strong that stuff actually is.

If you're restricted to low-temperature casting, it might be helpful to visit your nearest high-quality metal scrap yard and see if they have any zinc die-casting alloy. These guys know metals rather well and can likely give you hints on melting temperatures and such. Most die-casting today is done with aluminum, but that requires a crucible that can withstand a fairly violent furnace.

Having said that, I can attest that it's fun to melt aluminum: dig a 12" hole in the ground, bury a pipe so that it slants down into the bottom of that hole, fill the hole with charcoal from the grocery store, dump in some crumpled newspaper and maybe charcoal lighter, add a match, wait a few minutes for the charcoal to catch, and then apply an old hair dryer to the pipe (you can attach it to the pipe with duct tape for an added touch of elegance.)

When the air from the hair dryer (set it on 'cold') reaches the smoldering charcoal interesting things start to happen: red flames issue from the ground, and the roar of the fire will keep the neighbors from ever bothering you again. Smoke issues from cracks in the soil near the hole.

Do not use the family barbecue grill for this sort of thing, for it will essentially burn up.

The crucible can be a piece of iron pipe closed at one end: feed it crushed aluminum cans and other aluminum scrap. Molten aluminum doesn't glow brightly, so caution is advised. Borrow a tablet of swimming-pool chlorine and dump it into the melt to purge dissolved gases and thus eliminate bubbles, and pour your casting.

You will never look at an aluminum shower stall or screen door the same way again.

M Kinsler
Hey I did that exact thing with the ground furnace! I was able to melt aluminum but I kept getting debris in the crucible and it took a long time to melt. I want to cast a special crankcase out of 6061 for the Stihl 54mm cylinder. I would tap the holes to 5/16 and 1/4 instead because well this is America and Ace hardware doesn’t have sh*t for metric.
 
M

Mark Kinsler

Guest
Hey I did that exact thing with the ground furnace! I was able to melt aluminum but I kept getting debris in the crucible and it took a long time to melt. I want to cast a special crankcase out of 6061 for the Stihl 54mm cylinder. I would tap the holes to 5/16 and 1/4 instead because well this is America and Ace hardware doesn’t have sh*t for metric.
Ace Hardware doesn't, but your local farm store (Tractor Supply, Farm & Fleet, and many others) will have a fine selection of metric hardware, as should most big home improvement stores. But in any case for automotive work like this you'd want to use fine thread SAE fasteners like 1/4"-28 as opposed to 1/4"-20.

See if you can look up some casting videos on YouTube, and see if Lindsay Publications is still in business, for they have a comprehensive line of books on home foundries. And let everyone know how it all comes out.

Mark Kinsler

20 degrees F is kind of too cold to experiment with my centrifugal clutch.
 
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