Sunlite deluxe dual springer fork help

UtiliD

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I Recently got a ridiculous deal on

these forks with a 1" threaded steerer tube but didnt realize they had a 300mm / 12" steerer tube with tall springs and a tall top plate. These are intended for a standard Dyno Glide Cruiser with 5 1/4" head tube (thats not including the headset).


I can not find any information on what the minimum head tube size is for these forks. I saw that a Florida company in Ft. Meyers that specializes in OCC Choppers sells these same forks with shorter springs but spacers on top between them and the top plate. Obviously OCC choppers have head tubes much taller than my inteneed build.


I have several things I'd like advice on...

1st

Pictures 2 and 3 show what kind of show what im referring to below in my 1st idea
I have steerer tube sleeves for putting 1 1/8" spacers and stems on 1" steerer tubes. Im thinking about stacking a 50mm headset spacer then a 25mm 2 bolt seatpost clamp (both with 1 1/8th ID... the sleeves reduce the ID to 1" to match the steerer tube) on the bottom of the steerer tube.

The sleeve would sit 1/4" higher on the steerer tube than the seatpost clamp for the crown race to fit on to(I may have to grind the OD of the sleeve to fit the xrown race but no big deal)... Does anyone see any problems arrising from this?


2nd: picture 4 shows the plate im talking about.

The only place I could find parts for forks even like these is a site with monarch in the name. They have a chrome top plate that does not extend up like mine does but I dont know if it would fit. The other thing is my top plate has a slit in it and at the top a hex head bolt pinches the top plate together and Im not sure why or if this is necessary. Would the monarch top plate fit and would it affect how the suspension functions?


3rd


I thought about installing a threadless headset then putting soacers on top then the top part of a threaded headset above the top plate? I dont like this idea because it seems to me like the least likely to accomplish what im doing.


4th


I could get shorter springs but think it would limit the amount of travel the suspension has.


Ok that is kind of part 1 I personally hope option 1 will work out but really want feedback from some experienced builders.


Now on to possible future modifications..
The last picture shows what im talking about here.
Ive seen forks like these with springs above and below the top plate. If I went with shorter springs on the bottom could I put some small ones on top of the bracket to provide some kind of rebound dampening?


I was going to upgrade the plastic spacers that these forks come with to bushings possibly skateboard bushings. Ive read that people upgrade these spacers and would like to know the best/ cheapest way to upgrade them.


Ive uploaded pictures but will upload more when I get time.
 

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A few things to consider (in no particular order):

The Sunlite fork is built much stronger than the Monark. I have both. Sunlite weighs twice as much. The Sunlite's top plate fits the spring rods much tighter than the Monark's does. Monark provides plastic washers to center the rods (they don't, not worth a damn anyway). Really old Monark forks had rubber bushings that went in those big holes and provided some cushioning. You could substitute the Monark plate, and as long as you cinch the steerer down nice and tight it will stay put. But if you're half-assing it onto a 1-1/8 bike (which I wouldn't do) you may not be able to get it tight enough. Can't help you there.

All those plastic spacers are there so you can set the ride height. You want the rocker arms to run level with weight on the bike, and the way you do that is to move spacers around. If you end up with spacers above the top plate, you can substitute rubber hose to provide a little rebound cushion.

If you want rebound springs to actually work, you'll need to compress the compression springs while you install them, if you can get enough threads to show above the spring. This all depends on steerer tube length and ride height. Then you need to source some springs with enough strength and enough travel to do the job. I've found the rubber hose to be good enough, and a whole lot easier.
 
The Dyno cruiser has a head tube for a 1" steerer tube. I was talking about 1 1/8th headset spacers only for the Idea I had about building up the bottom of the steerer tube so the crown race would sit 75mm higher and I could use a shim about 80mm so the crown race has something solid to install on to.

Id prefer to not have to buy the other top plate. Im going to try and raise the crown race 1st I'm just wondering if / how it might affect the function of the fork. Ill post more pictures about what im talking about when I can.
 
A few things to consider (in no particular order):

The Sunlite fork is built much stronger than the Monark. I have both. Sunlite weighs twice as much. The Sunlite's top plate fits the spring rods much tighter than the Monark's does. Monark provides plastic washers to center the rods (they don't, not worth a damn anyway). Really old Monark forks had rubber bushings that went in those big holes and provided some cushioning. You could substitute the Monark plate, and as long as you cinch the steerer down nice and tight it will stay put. But if you're half-assing it onto a 1-1/8 bike (which I wouldn't do) you may not be able to get it tight enough. Can't help you there.

All those plastic spacers are there so you can set the ride height. You want the rocker arms to run level with weight on the bike, and the way you do that is to move spacers around. If you end up with spacers above the top plate, you can substitute rubber hose to provide a little rebound cushion.

If you want rebound springs to actually work, you'll need to compress the compression springs while you install them, if you can get enough threads to show above the spring. This all depends on steerer tube length and ride height. Then you need to source some springs with enough strength and enough travel to do the job. I've found the rubber hose to be good enough, and a whole lot easier.


By the way thanks for going through my long winded post and responding.
 
Pictures 2 and 3 show what kind of show what im referring to below in my 1st idea
I have steerer tube sleeves for putting 1 1/8" spacers and stems on 1" steerer tubes. Im thinking about stacking a 50mm headset spacer then a 25mm 2 bolt seatpost clamp (both with 1 1/8th ID... the sleeves reduce the ID to 1" to match the steerer tube) on the bottom of the steerer tube.

The sleeve would sit 1/4" higher on the steerer tube than the seatpost clamp for the crown race to fit on to(I may have to grind the OD of the sleeve to fit the xrown race but no big deal)... Does anyone see any problems arrising from this?

If I am understanding what you are trying to adapt a 1" front end to fit on a 1-1/8" bicycle, right?

When I built my bike, I had the same problem.

The way that I solved it was that I had an aluminum spacer machined out lf aluminum which press fit into where the 1-1/8" bearings would normally go, and the inside diameter of the part is such that the 1" bearing cup press into, and the total spacer is 1/2" thick.

By the way I looked online for ages and could never find a comercially manufactured part.

Would this fix that problem?
 
If I am understanding what you are trying to adapt a 1" front end to fit on a 1-1/8" bicycle, right?

When I built my bike, I had the same problem.

The way that I solved it was that I had an aluminum spacer machined out lf aluminum which press fit into where the 1-1/8" bearings would normally go, and the inside diameter of the part is such that the 1" bearing cup press into, and the total spacer is 1/2" thick.

By the way I looked online for ages and could never find a comercially manufactured part.

Would this fix that problem?
No both the fork steerer tube and head tube are 1"(head tube accepts a 1" steerer tube not a 1 1/8th)

This has to do with the 1st idea i listed to make up for the head tube of the bike being too short for the space between where the crown race would normally go on the fork to bottom of the top plate.

The only thing 1 1/8th is the spacers i would use to raise the crown race and even those get turned into 1" spacers because I would use a shim under them... look at pic 2 and 3.

The reason for the 1 1/8th spacers is I could make the shim taller than the spacers so the crown race(also 1") has something to hold it in place so it doesnt spin freely.
 
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This fork is made for bikes with very tall head tubes. I dont know the minimum but id say 7 1/2" plus. My Dyno Glide cruiser has a 5 1/4" tall head tube.
 
Yea shorter springs would work but for now Id prefer not to buy springs. Down the line I might if I decide to try and add springs on top too for rebound dampening.
 
A few things to consider (in no particular order):

The Sunlite fork is built much stronger than the Monark. I have both. Sunlite weighs twice as much. The Sunlite's top plate fits the spring rods much tighter than the Monark's does. Monark provides plastic washers to center the rods (they don't, not worth a damn anyway). Really old Monark forks had rubber bushings that went in those big holes and provided some cushioning. You could substitute the Monark plate, and as long as you cinch the steerer down nice and tight it will stay put. But if you're half-assing it onto a 1-1/8 bike (which I wouldn't do) you may not be able to get it tight enough. Can't help you there.

All those plastic spacers are there so you can set the ride height. You want the rocker arms to run level with weight on the bike, and the way you do that is to move spacers around. If you end up with spacers above the top plate, you can substitute rubber hose to provide a little rebound cushion.

If you want rebound springs to actually work, you'll need to compress the compression springs while you install them, if you can get enough threads to show above the spring. This all depends on steerer tube length and ride height. Then you need to source some springs with enough strength and enough travel to do the job. I've found the rubber hose to be good enough, and a whole lot easier.
What kind of hose do you suggest?
 
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