The craziness continues

After several spits and starts, I managed some progress in the shop today. Thought about swapping the stock wheel for a double walled Mavic with 12 gauge spokes, but realize I have my hands full with the springer. Did decide to change the front wheel's bayonet mount to a high strength solid axle, and while I was at it, I cleaned and re-lubed the bearings, installed new cones, and swapped the 160 rotor for a 185 Shimano. Don't have one on hand, but can go to a 203 mm later on by simply changing the caliper adapter. Countersunk axle holes in rockers for aluminum axle keepers and cut slots to simplify wheel removal and installation. Fabricated 3/8" aluminum spacers to perfectly center the wheel. Tomorrow will make a caliper mount and weld to left side rocker and upgrade stock caliper with an Avid BB7 from the parts bin. Once new front end is installed, will change the dual hand brake lever for individual MC levers with integrated brake switches. Photos look strange because the unit is held upside down in the vice.
OMG this is amazing
 
Got bushings installed on the lower links to dissipate friction from up and down movement of the springer. They are standard 7/16 " collars with angled zerk fittings in place of the set screw for ease of lubrication with a grease gun just like vintage Harley springers. This extra lubrication will extend the life of the parts.

In addition, a mounting plate of 1/4" plate was welded to the left link to hold the Avid brake caliper. It's mounted on the link to keep it in constant configuration with the wheel. The great thing about Avid brakes is their versatility. You can adjust them to nearly any angle. The caliper will hang on the bottom of the left link with the cable running up the rear of the left fork tube. Cable guides will eventually be installed

Finally, one of the photos shows the vintage bicycle speedometer drive unit that powers my Stewart Warner speedometer.

This thing is finally coming together. When my parts speak, I do what they say.
 

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Got bushings installed on the lower links to dissipate friction from up and down movement of the springer. They are standard 7/16 " collars with angled zerk fittings in place of the set screw for ease of lubrication with a grease gun just like vintage Harley springers. This extra lubrication will extend the life of the parts.

In addition, a mounting plate of 1/4" plate was welded to the left link to hold the Avid brake caliper. It's mounted on the link to keep it in constant configuration with the wheel. The great thing about Avid brakes is their versatility. You can adjust them to nearly any angle. The caliper will hang on the bottom of the left link with the cable running up the rear of the left fork tube. Cable guides will eventually be installed

Finally, one of the photos shows the vintage bicycle speedometer drive unit that powers my Stewart Warner speedometer.

This thing is finally coming together. When my parts speak, I do what they say.
Looks awesome 👌
 
Test fitting went smoothly today. The Raleigh steering tube slid in like a glove and its races matched up perfectly with the bike's bearings. Screw on cap fit with one narrow bushing proving that my dimensions were pretty close. The preload is greater than expected, so it took a while to adjust it, but I have a bucket full of neoprene spacers so it was simply a matter of trial and error. Custom designed some risers( not shown yet) and have some ideas for custom made bars from scrap 3/4" tubing. The springer extends the bike's footprint considerably and makes it feel more like a board tracker than a bicycle. This part is much more fun than the measuring and cutting I've been doing for the past week. Fitment of bars, headlight, fender and controls calls for more trial and error.
 

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Good question, Wyvern. To me, springers scream old school. They look interesting, they ride cushy, and it's fun watching them work as you negotiate speed bumps and pot holes. They're typically not dampened, so they arent't as technically advanced as modern shocks. It all depends on what you're looking for. I know what I prefer because I've tried them all.

That said, I got a burst of energy after dinner so I scrambled out to the shop and made a set of abstract handlebars from scrap tubing in the junk bin. The center section came from a handicap walker I got from a thrift store for two bucks. It's welded to two sections of bars I cut up for an exhaust that I never used!!! The risers are nothing more than vintage seat post clamps connected to 5/16" threaded couplers that I'll weld to steel tabs held in place by the bolts that hold the top tree to the fork tubes. Didn't have time to finish that step tonight. The bars can be raised by simply adding another coupler screwed together by a section of threaded rod. Strong and versatile. If the bars don't work well, I'll ditch 'em and try something else.
 

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More mock up work this morning. Handlebars and headlight are mounted to test placement. Bike has an odd look with the wide bars, but it's just an experiment at this point. Call me a non-conformist.
 

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Intended to weld turn stops on the triple tree, but somehow got distracted and ended up making a control panel and electronics box instead. The face for the box is a unit I bought from Amazon on a whim some time ago. It holds a digital voltmeter, an on-off switch for accessories, a universal 12 volt plug, and a USB charging plug. I replaced the USB plug for the ignition switch. I'll connect my rectifier/regulator to the input side of the voltmeter and connect the lights and horn to the hot side of the on/off switch. I made the 4" square metal box out of 1/16" plate. It will house all of the wiring and fuses in addition to serving as a mount for the panel. In a pure stroke of luck, the box fits perfectly on the top tree between the handlebar risers, the headlight, and the steering tube cap. Right now it's open in the rear for the wires, will probably fabricate a removable door. I know the bike is starting to look a little funky, but I'm just going with the flow.
 

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