Troubleshooting and Chain Skipping

Well buddy, you're in luck! It's the last few days of school and I got bored doing nothing in my english class, so I decided to read a little more into your thread on my computer. On my phone I found it very difficult to read, please use larger text size, don't bold and italicize the words, and don't have a giant wall of text, those are particularly hard for us to read. Another thing is when people try to suggest you do these kinds of things please don't be insulting, especially to our moderators. Thanks.

You weren't specific on what kind of engine you are working with as you mentioned a 100cc two stroke, but from reading your post I am guessing this bike has a 4 stroke.

Now to get to your issues. You are way overcomplicating this. The chian having issues would not be related to balance issues with either the internals or overall balance of your bike.

The engine mounts for the four stroke bikes I have heard are not very great, so that is a possibility. Although you claimed to have checked this, so have many others before you and they have found the mount to be problematic. If this is the case upgrading all the hardware is about the best you can do.

The chain itself could be worn, however you never mentioned how long and how much you have ridden, so this factor is undeterminable. The stock tensioners are a problem, they don't work well and they often destroy people's wheels. I personally cut the chain to length and tension it as if it where a motorcycle (using the adjustment in the rear dropouts). If you aren't able to do so, the arc type tensioners are the best.

You mentioned aligning the wheel on the bike. That is important, but not as important as chain alignment. The wheel can be offset from the center of the bike to get proper chain alignment if need be. Just because the wheel is centered it doesn't mean that your chain is. If the chain looks to be riding to one side of the sprocket it is not properly aligned.

My main theory is you have poor sprocket alignment. Not only between the drive and driven sprockets, but the rear sprocket likely isn't centered on the hub causing an up and down wobble. This will cause the chain to tension more at one part of the sprocket's rotation and looser at another. this will make the chain make noise and a jerking while riding if it is bad enough. This can and will destroy your rear wheel too.

Not that I have given my 2 cents on your chain issue, I'll now address your idle issue. The wheel should rotate slightly at idle when lifted off the ground, but not any more than a slow rotation. If it rotates fast your idle is too high or you have clutch issues. To properly adjust idle turn the idle screw down until the engine dies, then turn it in half a turn and see if it will idle. If not, go another half turn.

I ask that you please be more respectful, especially when asking for help. We are a pretty fun and helpful crowd if you don't pi$$ us off.
Didn't I explicitly mention it's a 100CC two-stroke from the get-go? So no need for guesses.

Now, I've been out of school for decades myself, so your remarks about the last few days of school and English class are way off base. Stick to the matter at hand, will ya?

Your advice on font size and formatting is duly noted, but don't get distracted. Your assumptions about overcomplication and worn-out tensioners are just that - assumptions. I've always done my homework, trust me.

As for your theory on poor sprocket alignment causing a wobble, it's really creative, but inaccurate. And suggesting basic idle adjustments? Come on, man, I'm not a novice.

Finally, let's talk about some respect. I'm here seeking genuine help, not condescension. Again keep it constructive or do not bother chiming in at all. Clear enough?
 
Didn't I explicitly mention it's a 100CC two-stroke from the get-go? So no need for guesses.

Now, I've been out of school for decades myself, so your remarks about the last few days of school and English class are way off base. Stick to the matter at hand, will ya?

Your advice on font size and formatting is duly noted, but don't get distracted. Your assumptions about overcomplication and worn-out tensioners are just that - assumptions. I've always done my homework, trust me.

As for your theory on poor sprocket alignment causing a wobble, it's really creative, but inaccurate. And suggesting basic idle adjustments? Come on, man, I'm not a novice.

Finally, let's talk about some respect. I'm here seeking genuine help, not condescension. Again keep it constructive or do not bother chiming in at all. Clear enough?
Welp, I tried. I was completely respectful and trying to help, if anyone needs to be more respectful it would be he who brought disrespect here.
 
Finally, let's talk about some respect. I'm here seeking genuine help, not condescension. Again keep it constructive or do not bother chiming in at all. Clear enough?
Time for YOU to learn a little respect and lose the attitude, DAS IST VERBOTEN, Jawohl ???
People here have been quite patient with you thus far.

Again keep it constructive
We did, in a very nice way we have tried to inform you how excessive your posting was...and now for the first time, I will call it "fluff".

We do not need a total "DOSSIER" like you posted just to say you have a chain problem, have you ever been on forums before now???

My post was carefully crafted with some time and effort, covering all the necessary details. It took me several hours to put together,
If it takes you several hours to put together a posting just to say you need help with a chain problem, you have Waaay too much time on your hands that would have been better used examining the laws of physics governing what your chain is actually doing to be a cause of problems to you.
 
As for your theory on poor sprocket alignment causing a wobble, it's really creative, but inaccurate. And suggesting basic idle adjustments? Come on, man, I'm not a novice.
Hmmm...Really???...Last I knew, chain problems, alignment issues, tension issues etc. IS a novice problem around here, the very bare bones basics of problems when people join this forum, one of the most common issues with folks building these bikes I might add.
 
If you know a person is a renowned expert on a particular subject, then you sit quietly and listen to their lectures while taking notes. This is more of a group learning forum; you make a statement/ask a question then wait for a response. Your first post may have been very informative. However, it seems like too much too fast. You probably could've made several threads from it over the next several weeks.

Though the writing was too small you did structure most of it very well. I try to keep my threads subject as close to the title as possible. Once the topic has gotten satisfactory responses, I then don't mind going off subject and having some humorous fun.
 
Back
Top