3rd Friction Drive build (pics)

Discussion in 'Friction Drive' started by concretepumper, Sep 1, 2011.

  1. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    Building this for a guy. IMHO I wouldn't use this bike but thats me. He brought me the bike & motor. Asked if I could make it work. I told him I would give it a try. Anyways here is how I managed to bolt the drive spindle on. Using a homelite 35cc chainsaw for this one. Scrapped the clutch and went direct. Also cut some grooves every 1/2 inch on the peg to get some better traction. Should help.
    Need a turnbuckle for the tensioner and a few other items for the hardware store but almost done.

    http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m419/rickherrick/Bikes/3Motorbike003.jpg

    http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m419/rickherrick/Bikes/3Motorbike004.jpg

    http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m419/rickherrick/Bikes/3Motorbike006.jpg

    http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m419/rickherrick/Bikes/3Motorbike005.jpg

    http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m419/rickherrick/Bikes/3Motorbike009.jpg

    http://i334.photobucket.com/albums/m419/rickherrick/Bikes/3Motorbike010.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 15, 2011

  2. srdavo

    srdavo Active Member

  3. MotorBicycleRacing

    MotorBicycleRacing Well-Known Member

    Looking good! You are turning those friction drives out and you
    have some creative skills.
    Time to stuff a Briggs motor into a frame! :devilish:
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  4. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    Ok just a update I got the throttle cable worked out just need to get the right size fuel lines in the AM.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Mike St

    Mike St Member

    Does this engine have a clutch? Without one, it won't idle.
     
  6. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    No no clutch. When you stop the motor stops too. I figure the motor running at stops would attract more attention. Working on a motor now with a clutch.
     
  7. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    This looks really neat. Did you cut your own flywheel? How did you do away with the clutch? I don't blame you for not worrying about clutches or lifts. Cold starting may be harder though. That bike is going to be scary at any speed with those brakes. The very least upgrade he can do is buy soft v-brake pads to replace the stock pads, and turn the rims with sandpaper. I've done it to cheap road bikes and it made a LOT of difference. Good luck. Some old Staton designs had a turnbuckle on one side.
     
  8. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    Thanks Happy. Actually this old Diamond Back was bought new by my Mother. Very little use and the brakes work well. I have had a Cannondale with disc so I can compare. Not too bad. I have 2 of these DB's and am wanting to do the other too so the wife might want to ride. Yea cold starts without a warm up are tough but here in Hemet Cali it is just plain HOT, then cold. I don't like cold and won't ride much then. However I am about ready for a break in the heat. 100 plus for the last few weeks. So Cal Edison loves billing me for the A/C though.
     
  9. Mike St

    Mike St Member

    I think a clutch with a gear box would be better, at the very minimum a clutch.
     
  10. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    I agree. However I didn't spend any money on the first build. I am working on a few designs now.
     
  11. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    Clutches are a weak point. If you are building a side loading design like this, they are a really weak point in the system. This design eliminates the problem: the chainsaw clutch will likely wear quickly when used for something with a much bigger mass to move before full engagement. (A chainsaw might take on a large load when sawing, but it is not multiplied a dozen times by the length of the spindle, and the chain is often spinning before hitting the wood. ) If you are only going to ride this out of town it wouldn't be too bothersome. Stoplights would get old fast though in the city.
     
  12. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    Yea good point. A c clutch would not like the stress of the load angle. We live on the edge of a large city with lots of 55 mph hwys not a lot of light or traffic at our end of town.
     
  13. Mike St

    Mike St Member

    I'm not sure if your argument against clutches and their use stands up, since all high quality gopeds have clutches, and are driven very hard by some very powerful high rpm engines. If I were to use a 25cc engine, the goped 54mm racing clutch might be perfect.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2011
  14. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    Are the clutches side-loaded with a long spindle that turns on a tire, and pulled down by a turnbuckle or spring? Anyway, a "high quality go-ped" is probably a long way from a shop-fabbed mount and Homelite chainsaw. This is nicely done, but still hard on the engine compared to the Dax and Staton type kits. And I'm sure the go-ped clutch has "heavier" springs and thicker shoes made for moving the full weight of a person. Apples and oranges.
     
  15. concretepumper

    concretepumper New Member

    Peaches to plumbs yeah. I'm bananas pu&%#, cut off the grapes and grow a pair. Now I want some fruit. Quote ... Lol.

    I have been looking into bearings and such to build something that supports the drive spindle on both sides. I'm not sure how long the little motor will take the stress. Gonna have fun till then. Oh wait. This bike is for somebody else.
     
  16. Mike St

    Mike St Member

    Yes, goped clutches have long spindles. It's a friction drive just like a friction drive on a bicycle, and they handle much more horsepower. For best operation, the spindle is supported on two sides, which is just good engineering on both a goped and a bicycle.
     
Loading...