Chain Tensioner Chain tensioner !?

Discussion in 'Transmission / Drivetrain' started by Patch, Jun 13, 2007.

  1. Patch

    Patch Guest

    I remember reading that I should chuck the original tensioner. But What do I use?

    I already lathed out 2 rollerblade wheels to replace the nylon, but if you say to toss the mount, what should I use instead?

    Any other good designs for a new one? Thanks :D
     

  2. Papasaun

    Papasaun Guest

  3. Egor

    Egor Guest

    I have the one from Dax that has the bearings in it. Anyone out there with one also?, so far it works great. My Schwinn has the fiction one and it is still good but I take it off and lube it often. Have fun, Dave
     
  4. Patch

    Patch Guest

    yes...I did replace the wheel and It does spin, but I just think that bracket is alittle under-engineered.

    I also have the bearings in my old tensioner, except the little square thing on the tightening bolt assembly stripped out, so as I was filling the thing square aagain, the grade -1 bolt snapped on me.

    So here I am replacing the bolt, sliced my finger open, and now have some free time, and I just was wondering if I could fabricate a better tensioner. Like a super spring loaded one, or an angle one.

    PS I have a schwinn stingray with a new muffler so I have to run my tensioner on the inside of the frame so I wanted to get a smaller bracket to center the tensioner in the middle of the fork bar.

    I have the same setup as prowler http://www.motoredbikes.com/viewtopic.php?t=1766&highlight=prowler
     
  5. V 35

    V 35 Member

    The Sportsman style tensioner beats everything to a pulp ! If you want to test the theroy, take a medicine, or Nip bottle and hold it a few inches from axle, on a bike with
    very slack chain. The closer you move the bottle to the sprocket, the tighter the chain becomes. Spring loaded tensioners are a good idea on poorly indexed rag joints.
    If you value your safety, replace the rag joint included with most kits, with a clamshell
    hub, and matching sprocket, this gives torque to * all * spokes evenly, and is much safer.
     
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