Im 265 lb guy. What are my options for rear tire & inner tube performance? flats 101

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by dotcom, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. dotcom

    dotcom Member

    I am 265 pounds and have a standard 26' beach cruiser with a "66/80" China engine kit on it and I have rear tire inner tube flats too often. I bought one of those thick self sealing inner tubes from walmart for $12.96 and that only lasted me about 2 weeks. Walmart was kind enough to return it for a refund so I thought before I exchange it for the same one, I would find out about something punctureless. I am wondering what are my options. Also, I do not like the traction that the standard beach cruiser tire has so I am also wondering what my options for that.
     

  2. dotcom

    dotcom Member

    Can I use a mountain bike rear wheel and tire? Mountain bike tires seem to have much better traction that those slick beach cruiser tires so I would like some second opinions. Walmart also has an airless punctureless inner tube but the measurements do not go with my standard beach cruiser tire that is 26x2.125...The punctureless tube at biggest size says 26x1.95...
     
  3. dotcom

    dotcom Member

    I would love a punctureless back wheel but do not know much about it. Any advise? 265 lbs plus the weight of the bike and engine kit and about 15 more lbs total in my backpack.
     
  4. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    Punctureless is not always the best option on a motorbike, much less for a larger person. I'm a little bigger than you at 285, and I run Kenda K838's on both wheels with the slime tubes you can buy at walmart. In 3 years, never had a puncture flat yet. As far as traction, knobby tires actually have less contact with the road than slick tires do. The K838 is a slick tire. In dry conditions it grips the road better and has a smoother ride. In wet conditions you need to be more careful, but the only times I lost control was when I hit my front brake too hard. Both times if I'd approached my stop while slowing down and gently squeezed my brake, I would have been fine. If you have to make an emergency stop on wet or slippery roads, it won't much matter what tire you have. If you're interested in the Kenda K838, search ebay or amazon. They usually run $15-20 apiece.
     
  5. dotcom

    dotcom Member

    more feedback please.... I still think punctureless is what I want, especially to know I do not have a flat or don't have to worry about a flat.
     
  6. butterbean

    butterbean Well-Known Member

    Well, sure, don't take advice from a guy who is bigger than you and hasn't had a flat in 3 years. One thing I forgot to mention. If you're changing the tires yourself, you could be getting flats. It took me a lot of practice to get good at it. The trick is to make sure that the bead of the tire remains seated as you are pumping air into it. I do this by pumping a little bit of air in at a time and working the bead until it's too stiff to work the bead on anymore. Over-inflation will also cause flats. I bought a hand pump with a built-in psi gauge so I always know exactly how much air I'm putting in. The 838's can go 35-85 psi, I always put in 42 in each tire. And my bike is pretty hefty, considering without a motor it would still weigh almost 70 lbs and it's a 98cc 4 stroke, so it weighs almost twice as much as a China girl. Like I said, no flats in 3 years. I wouldn't be telling you all this if it didn't work extremely well for me. And the 838's are very durable. After 600 miles, they still look brand new. No walmart brand tire or punctureless design will boast that, certainly not on a motorbike. Most punctureless designs are softer than pneumatic tires, making them wear much faster. And they cost 3 times as much, so if you pay 3 times as much and they wear 3 times as fast, you'll end up spending 9 times as much on tires. Trust me bro, after 4 years of motorbiking, I spent more on tubes and tires in the first year (before I switched to slime tubes, learned how to properly change a tire and put the right amount of air in) than I have in the past 3 years of doing it right. I just bought the 838's this past spring, and they've held up better than any other tires I've ever owned, including a $45 Specialized brand tire.
     
  7. motman812

    motman812 Member

    I was having problems with the tubes splitting across the tube on my friction drive, tried nearly everything and finally found Schwalbe Marathon tires with tire liners and a heavy duty tube. I haven't had a problem in several years (and hundreds of miles). The Schwalbe Marathons have a Kevlar belt and are extra thick but cost around $50 each. You might also want to look into a heavy duty wheel on which you can also get a built-in sprocket.
     
  8. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    Yep go to war on flats. Kevlar tires, thorn resistant tubes and tire liners like nomoflats. If you get a flat armed with those then it's GOD's will and was meant to be.
     
  9. Barry

    Barry Member

    From another old fat guy, I went with 3" tires and things improved for me.
     
  10. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    Use thorn proof tubes filled with slime - they won't let you down - sorry the pun.
     
  11. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    I strongly disagree, slime is a waste and once you do have a flat you'll regret it. Most reputable tire places won't even repair a slimed flat. If they do the cost goes from $20 to $80 at least. You have to clean everything and it's a labor issue.
     
  12. dotcom

    dotcom Member

    I ended up spending $46.00 today on a new motorized bike tire that the shop says is specifically for bikes with motors on it. That was $20 and a new thick with slime tube was $11.99 and one of those strips that go between the tire and inner tube was another $11.99. So altogether I paid about $35.00 for a new tire, inner tube and that strip thing that goes between the tire and tube since walmart refunded $13.00 back for the first slime tire that didn't last more than 2 weeks.
    Onward and upward-
     
  13. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

  14. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Well-Known Member

    One thing you'll notice reading threads is that, for some reason, some folks get a lot of flats and some don't. I'm not able to explain the difference, though I have a few suspicions about causes.

    And I think that butterbean was onto something when he suggested that you be careful about mounting and proper inflation.

    Done right, that'll carry you a long, long way.
     
  15. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    What may be the cause?
     
  16. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    I place the tyre on the rim - throw a slime-filled, thorn proof tube in side the tyre - press the bead of the open end of the tyre onto the rim; wiggling it to make sure the tube is not trapped between the rim and the tyre bead.
    The last part of the tyre is lifted over the rim with tyre levers, carefully making sure the tube does not get pinched by the tyre levers.

    26 x 2.125 tyres are inflated to 20 psi on the front and 24 psi at the rear. The lower pressures do wear out the tyres more quickly and absorb a bit of power but i prefer comfort over speed.
    A front tyre last 3,000 kilometers (1875 miles) and a rear lasts 1,500 kilometers (930 miles). I get my tyres from bikes found on the hard rubbish piles or at the tip. Lots of brand name bikes are thrown away, still wearing new tyres: Maxxis seeming to be the most common.
     
  17. Loose Nut

    Loose Nut Member

    Fabian likes this.
  18. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    That's such a great option to have.

    What are the chances that the wire bead will seat itself on a mountain bike wheel rim?
     
  19. Loose Nut

    Loose Nut Member

    Fabian: It's a good question. As I understand it, 26 inch motorcycle wheels are in two primary bead types: (it's difficult, because they use different names in different countries) There was banded aka beaded edge tires that were in use mainly until the mid 1920's. The are now considered dangerous because the air pressure holds the bead to the rim, when the pressure goes low, the tire falls right off. I think this happened on an episode of "What's in the Barn" in a race of 100 year old bikes. The other type of bead is the wire bead, that is harder to get on a rim, but safer. Tell me if I've lost my mind here. You know what, I have a 26 motorcycle tire in the garage, actually I have ones with both kinds of beads. I think I can take a picture....
     
  20. Loose Nut

    Loose Nut Member

    Here the pic of the bead on 26" wire type motorcycle tire. A Belgian tire. I tired to put a white bicycle tire in the back for comparison, but it washed out. The second picture is from a 2.85x26" beaded edge tire (now completely obsolete) I didn't want to monkey around with it too much, but you can see even the outside of the rim has a very different shape.
     

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