Schwinn sanctuary 7 4 stroke?

Discussion in 'Photos & Bicycle Builds' started by bikejock, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. bikejock

    bikejock Member

    I'm thinking of going with a Schwinn sanctuary 7 for my first 4 stroke build. Has anyone mounted a 4 stroke on this bike? I found it for $230 on amazon.com. It's got everything I want on it. It's got speeds, V breaks on both wheels, and a rear rack. schwinn bike.jpg
     

  2. dougsr.874

    dougsr.874 Active Member

    I've built several 4 stroke kits on this & similar Schwinn's....Schwinn is a good choice
     
    bikejock likes this.
  3. bikejock

    bikejock Member

    Cool. I used to have a Schwinn hybrid bike with 700cc wheels a few years ago. I like Schwinn to. It looks like it has enough space. Is the rear hub a good fit for the rear sprocket? I'd hate to have to modify anything to make it fit (aside from the expected modifications with 4 stroke builds) I'll be going to Walmart today to test one out to make sure it fits me. They have a single speed with a coaster break but the frame shouldn't be any different from the version I want.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2015
  4. bikejock

    bikejock Member

    Just went to Walmart today. They didn't have any Schwinn sanctuaries in stock but I found a Schwinn Point Beach that looks almost identical to the sanctuary 7 I was looking at on amazon. I also can fit on it comfortably. Has anyone ever mounted a an HS 50cc 4 stroke on that bike? IMG_3685.jpg
     
  5. dougsr.874

    dougsr.874 Active Member

    I've put several 4 stroke kits on this very bike, no mods needed to the bike.....depending on the engine mount I do modify it so that the engine sits farther forward. this makes it easier to check oil & such....Fact is I have a Point Beach with a Stage 111 four stoke for sale now.....
     
  6. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    A direct drive sprocket will go on dandy but if you have the $ you might want to consider a jackshaft.

    The 49cc HS 142 engine will move you OK once you get going but a real dog off the line.
    Using the bikes gears with the engine will get you off the line in a snap and let you go faster when you get into overdrive.

    [​IMG]

    Gears change everything ;-}
     
    bikejock likes this.
  7. bikejock

    bikejock Member

    Great! Can you post a pick of one of your Schwinn sanctuary or point beach builds? I would like to see what one looks like before I get it put together as it will take me some time to save for the engine kit. The bike I can probably get next month or in March. But I probably won't have the engine kit till April or may because 4 stroke kits cost more than 2 strokes but worth it from what I've read about them compared to 2 strokes.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2015
  8. sawdust

    sawdust Member

    I just started one of these this weekend with the HS 142F engine..will post some pics for you to look at..let me know what you think
     
    bikejock likes this.
  9. bikejock

    bikejock Member

    Awesome! Yeah defiantly post some picks. I wanna get some good respective before I start my first 4 stroke cruiser build. The HS 4 strokes are big engines (compared to 2 strokes) but they are easier to take care of and usually better quality than Chinese 2 strokes. I had a 2 stroke road bike a few years ago and man that thing was an annoying piece of crap. I hated having to mix gas & oil and the gear box started having major problems so I ended up selling it for parts. Now I'm in the market for a good 4 stroke kit. I was thinking of the HS 4G sold on phantombikes.com as they are the better quality 4 stroke kits. It would take me longer to save up for the 4G but its worth it from what I hear.
     
  10. Paul E.

    Paul E. Member

    Hi OP..I myself have a cruiser 4stroke with the 4G timing belt drive. No jackshaft or fancy gears here though. I do have some thoughts: So far, I like the mellow range of rpm and speed that 2/3 throttle gets me, 22-25mph as above that the rpm shakes the whole bike. I don't know yet what exact rpm it is, but the HS motor definitely likes cruising below wide open for sure.

    Thats fine with me, as I like the simplicity of one speed for reliability and less wrenching, but I need to make a big upgrade path choice concerning driveline soon. I've posted some pics that perhaps could be of interest; check em out!
     
  11. sawdust

    sawdust Member

    cruiser bike build with some pics

    The first thing I install is the rear sprocket. Now before I install the sprocket, I take the time to remove the rear hub assembly, remove the grease that's in there and pack the bearings with disk brake grease for cars. The reason for this is that we are going to be going faster than this grease was designed to used for. I do the front bearings also. When installing the gear once you get all the nuts snugged down. I use a piece of chalk to hold against the sprocket lightly and spin the wheel. This will tell you where you need to tighten the bolts more to get the sprocket straight and true. This will take some time, but it's worth doing it right. Don't forget to use lock tite on the bolt threads. The thing I install is the pedal crank assembly. You will have to buy new pedals as the new crank has to have 9/16 inch threaded pedals, the old ones are 1/2 inch. Now this bike has two different size of tubes. The front one being bigger than the rear. Also you will see in the motor mount picture that I have no bolts holding the mount together. That's because once I had the mount to size, I welded the two pieces together from the bottom. Also I used a socket to form the correct size on the front of the mount. This also was re welded to make it strong. Now before mounting the engine mount to the frame. Take the time to put the engine on the mount to make sure that the holes line up. Every mount I've used from these kits..the holes don't line up. Alot easier to fix this before the mount is on the bike. Also, I do take time to use grade 5 or 8 bolts from the hardware store in place of the junky ones that come in the kit. Don't forget in the final assembly..everything gets lock tite at that time. It's better to take your time to pre assemble everything and make it right now. Make sure it right..then do the final assembly. Almost forgot. I do use bike inner tube around the frame for the motor mount..keeps from damaging the frame and gives a bit of vibration relief. IMG_0660[1].jpg IMG_0661[1].jpg
     
    bikejock likes this.
  12. sawdust

    sawdust Member

    engine mount pic

    here is a little bit better pic of the engine mount...also..it makes it alot easier to build the bike if you have some kind of bike stand. I use a temporary road sign stand modified to my useage.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    Hey Sawdust, please help those that read your posts by throwing some paragraph breaks in you text so it's easily readable ;-}

    I have disagree with that advice.

    Mount the thing metal to metal as tight as you can get it.
    A strong mount is what prevents vibration from a loose mount.

    If you have excessive engine vibrations it's the engine, tune it.
    Other vibrations can come from other places like your wheels or drive train.
    Crappy bicycle tires at 25MPH will show their head with vibration.
     
    Paul E. likes this.
  14. bikejock

    bikejock Member

    Nice! thanks for the tips sawdust. Is there any chance of me using the mount included in the 4G kit without welding anything? I don't have access to a welding kit so I'd rather try not to weld anything. Maybe with the chain guard removed I can lower the mount decreasing the mounts width to say around 6 to 7 inches?
     
  15. sawdust

    sawdust Member

    advice

    Sorry about the running on at the mouth in my message. After working a 14 hour day..then working on the bike for a bit..I was tired and just ran on and on. Well, that's just what I do on my engine mounting. I've never had a problem with the way I've been mounting my engine this way. Again..just is the way I do it. You can do it anyway that you see fit.
    And that is my 2 cents worth. Thanks for the comments.
    Sawdust



    I have disagree with that advice.

    Mount the thing metal to metal as tight as you can get it.
    A strong mount is what prevents vibration from a loose mount.

    If you have excessive engine vibrations it's the engine, tune it.
    Other vibrations can come from other places like your wheels or drive train.
    Crappy bicycle tires at 25MPH will show their head with vibration.[/QUOTE]
     
  16. sawdust

    sawdust Member

    Well with this frame, I lowered the engine mount as far down on the frame as I could without hitting anything.
     
  17. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    I do that too, low as you can go ;-}
     
Loading...