Sprocket Centering

Discussion in 'Frame Mounted Engines' started by Guest, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I installed the sprocket last night and even though it looked almost perfectly true in both radial and axial run out, when I put the chain on it, it goes through the looser/tighter cycle. The chain goes from perfect to slightly loose.

    Is it possible that's the chain? It wasn't real bad. How much variation in chain tighteness do you veterns see?


    I know dax says you can have a millmeter of run out (seems excessive) but mine wasn't that much off, the run out side to side was nearly imperceptible. There was no run out to my eye radially.


    Run it?
     

  2. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin Guest

    run it, cautiously...you're about to be amazed at how much a chain can stretch, eventually you'll be finished adjusting the tensioner and should be fine after that.
     
  3. spunout

    spunout Member

    i ran into this myself and went ape-s#*t :x trying to figure it out. turns out the chain itself had a stretched section after it came off and got wedged between the sprocket and frame
     
  4. rcjunkie

    rcjunkie Guest

    Yep, just keep an eye on it. I typicall adjust my chains a little tighter than spec on a new install and am amazed by how much they stretch to the perfect tension over the next 1-2 hours of use. Keep it lubed up nice and good to prevent any galling associated with a new chain.


    Keep your initial rides short. You will have lots of tightening to do of wheels, sprocket mount bolts, chain tensioner, engine mount bolts, intake/exhaut bolts...you name it odds are it will need a tweaking. THis, of course assumes you didn't use loctite.
     
  5. rcjunkie

    rcjunkie Guest

    Forgot to mention, runout is not as critical wtih the 415 standard chain...plenty of space to accomodate any runout. However, this doesn't apply with 081 chain which is unforgiving of the small amount of runout/imbalance.
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I must have a 415 despite what dax says on eBay, because the chain I got was supposed to be a .081, but it's got so much side to side play it is worse than most worn out motorcycle chains! Seems way heavier than a bicycle chain though.

    I'll run it an keep an eye on it.
     
  7. azbill

    azbill Active Member

    it is even harder to center and true if you need 5 rubber rings on outside of spokes to clear tire :lol: :lol:, way more movement when tightening
    [​IMG]
    I have re-done my wheel about 10 times and it's close, but still no cigar :p
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I think I'll not worry too much then. :D
     
  9. rcjunkie

    rcjunkie Guest

    Curious, where did you get the extra rubber rings? I could use some more but would rather make them or buy them locally and avoid mail order.

    Thanks!
     
  10. azbill

    azbill Active Member

    they were left overs from 2 stingrays we built using hub adapters
     
  11. Dockspa1

    Dockspa1 Guest

    Just a suggestion, Has any one tried using a thick metal drilled ring inbetween the 2nd and 3rd rubber? Might keep some of the flex down a bit. Possibly even buy a 4" pvc flange and drill the 9 holes.
    Doc
     
  12. SlicerDicer

    SlicerDicer Guest

    I saw the gru-bee hub that you can mount sprockets on would that make it better? and if so where can you locate those?
     
  13. psuggmog

    psuggmog Guest

  14. thatsdax

    thatsdax Guest

    From Duane at Dax

    pick pick pick. A chain will stretch right off the bat, and never in an even way. Eventually it will be even..But until then, you have to account for the un even stretch. Anyone knows that. That is true with any chain. That is why you roll your wheel and find the tightest part of the chain and that is when you adjust the tightness. Axiomatic. Eventually after 500 to 1000 miles or so, the chain will even out. until then...Pick pick pick... You guys ......
     
  15. thatsdax

    thatsdax Guest

    oh..and a by the way..

    I currently have around 20 motorcycles , more than I need..a lot are going up for sale..I am keeping my Wes Cooley GS1000 and the Harley FXR. oh..And the KTM 440 Magnum. I will have a several Vespas and some Tuohes and some others for sale.. Keep in mind..This is not counting the Hondas, Yamahas, Kaw, BMW and many many others I have owned over the years... Point being..With few exceptions..."shaft drivers" chains and yes, even primary chains "harleys" stretch uneven.. So..Account for it... Thanks..
     
  16. Guest

    Guest Guest

    So you're saying it's more an issue with the chain and less an issue with the sprocket? I would be overwhelmed if I ever got the friggin' sprocket perfectly centered! :p

    BTW- I found that if you make the sprocket bolts just finger tight, then use a rubber mallet to tap the sprocket while turning the wheel on your truing stand, you can indeed get it perfectly centered in a few minutes......more or less until it sits overnight or the wind is blowing out of the south, then the dang thing goes crooked on you AGAIN. :cry:

    I made a centering/truing stand by cutting out an opening in a piece of plywood, then installing four screws at an angle so the axle sits in them. I then put the whole works across two sawhorses. When I'm done with it, it stores away real nice because it's 3'X3'X3/4" I then screwed a piece of 3/4"X1"x1' pine with one screw as a sort of "gauge"..I push it up against the offending party and when I spin the wheel, it moves out of the way showing max. runout.

    I'll post pictures if you want 'em......
     
  17. Dockspa1

    Dockspa1 Guest

    Sounds ideal Joe and ya go ahead and post that pic.
    Thanks
     
  18. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Here ya' go-[​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The wood piece is more for the rim true-ness gauge, but it can be used for the sprocket too.
     
  19. Dockspa1

    Dockspa1 Guest

    Now I see what you mean. That is a handy dandy idea. Thanks, I will give it a try.
    Doc
     
  20. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The piece of wood is held with one drywall screw...I move it for various "chores".

    Now if I could just get the sprocket centered and keep it that way once it's tightened, I'd be happy. Seemingly an impossible mission.

    Simple and cheap....kinda like me! :lol:
     
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