Another day, another coaster brake

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by Dmar, Aug 6, 2016.

  1. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    So I bought a new coaster brake it was a Schwinn meridian. Road for about 20 min and then boom bolt snapped and tire poped. So I know I'm putting everything together correct. I tightened the lock bolts to the point that I can't even get the new one off. IMAG0137.jpg IMAG0138.jpg IMAG0139.jpg I just want to know why I'm just changing coaster brakes like I'm changing underwear? Also does anyone else have this problem?
     

  2. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    1) did you enlarge the center hole of sprocket so hub cap fits inside it with clearance?

    2) did you bend brake arm so it doesn't snag the heads of sprocket bolts?

    3) when installing wheel in frame, did you fasten brake arm loosely until axle nuts were tight?

    and lastly, I refuse to put motors on coaster brake bikes and maybe you should consider that
     
    Dmar and FurryOnTheInside like this.
  3. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    also, it seems like your chain is rubbing against the tire. this might be causing flat tubes...
     
  4. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    Ya it wasn't when I put it together. It got like that from the coaster brake breaking. It pulled the tire towards the chain. I didn't even notice it while I was riding. It was to late when I did. I'm not putting any coaster brake on a bike again.
     
  5. Frankenstein

    Frankenstein Active Member

    Are you clutching while using the coaster brake? If not it could have something to do with it...
     
  6. Frankfort MB's

    Frankfort MB's Well-Known Member

    I actually just got in from riding and realized my coaster brake got hot enough it melted the paint off the hub..... That's a lot of force and heat near something spinning very fast:p
     
  7. Frankenstein

    Frankenstein Active Member

    Whew that's hot lol, but what can you expect when that momentum is converted almost entirely into thermal energy? Ever touch disk brakes after using them good? Ouch! Only reason why rim brakes and rims stay so cool is they are massive (in comparison to something like a small hub) and are capable of dissipating a lot of heat, especially figuring how much metal is seated with the spokes and nipples, it's like a giant heat sink hahaha...

    Well looks like it's time for you to start converting... Never been able to rely on coaster brakes anyways... I think it has to do with when I was a child growing up in a very rural, practically deserted, area, not too much to do but to explore the world around me on a bicyle. Had a coaster brake on several bikes back then and they never seemed to be able to stop me well or just ended up not working randomly. Good thing kids heal quickly or else my childhood probably would've sucked... Then got upgraded to an antique 3 speed rim brake bicycle, and my life was forever changed at that point.

    I don't see coasters as a good mains brake, I'd say leave it on and use especially sparingly. Then install a disk brake on the front, and if possible calipers on the rear, only use the coaster as a last resort should something fail.
     
  8. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    Ya that is the plan right now. I'm still in limbo cause I'm not sure if I want a cruiser or mtd. Mtb looks like a lot of fun. Especially that I live in the middle of nowhere and all that is around me is desert. But a cruiser would be fun way for me to get to work. I do have two engines as well just missing a couple of parts so I could do both. But funds would be a bit low if I did. As if funds aren't already low. As well as my time, working two jobs is getting heavy. I can always figure out a way. I might not be Eisenstein, but I'm not short of common sense.
     
  9. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    I did all of those and I know why you refuse to put a motor on coaster break bike. IMAG0141.jpg coaster brake #3 IMAG0142.jpg coaster #2 coaster brake#1 is in pieces somewhere between my house and where I wrecked.
     
  10. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    coaster brakes are designed for a one-speed bike that rarely goes faster than 11mph
     
  11. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    I wish I would have known that before I bought another bike.and destroyed that wheel. But at least I learned like I always do. The hard way.
     
  12. CrazyDan

    CrazyDan Member

    I was having issues with my stock coaster brake on a huffy cranbrook. Them caged bearings didn't last long. Braking from 30 mph loosens the hub a tad, eventually the caged bearings don't seat correctly and the brake pads would move from their spots and mess things up. I scavenged some parts from a similar hub with a bent axle. Worked fine for a bit longer, then the donor caged bearings blew out. Got loose bearings from a lbs, 15 loose bearings fit where a caged 9 bearing was. So far so good, never knew you could coast a cranbrook without popping and clanking noises coming from the coaster hub lol. Trying to be nicer to it and intend to get a new front suspension fork with tabs for disc brakes (on a cranbrook :p) gonna get a plain cruiser caliper for the rear. Then the coaster will be for emergency braking only.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2016
  13. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    So I'm just going to get away from coaster breaks altogether. I'm getting some bike parts hopefully tomorrow. I already have two cranebrook bikes but no brakes. I do have a diamond back bike that I can use I'm still debating though cranbrook or diamond back. I have another engine, just missing a lot of parts though. So I'm just ready to put some miles in an engine.
     
  14. Frankfort MB's

    Frankfort MB's Well-Known Member

    The cranbrook frame is a good frame but the wheels are terrible, see if you could salvage everything but the wheels.....
     
  15. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    Ya I'm going too Ya I'm get of of those evil pos.
     
  16. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    if you like huffy, I've gotten good builds out of the fresno model - spokes are way thick on those, but it took just a bit of filing to get rear 9 bolts past the oversized hub

    frame is very small for a 26", but it eats the vibration down to almost nothing
     
  17. CrazyDan

    CrazyDan Member

    You can make the cranbrook fairly reliable if you replace all bearings and the wheels lol. I can feel my rear twist slightly if I take a hard turn under power, but I haven't bent or broken anything (yet). Since you have 2 cranbrooks check the welds out on both, pick the one with the better looking welds.

    BTW, did you unfasten your brake arm from the chainstay for those pics? If not, there is your problem...
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2016
  18. Dmar

    Dmar Member

    No I didn't while I was riding the brake arm shaped the bolt off. Then the tire was loosened and wobbled all over the place.
     
  19. CrazyDan

    CrazyDan Member

    I made a beefy replacement for my brake arm 1470693711368-1600247987.jpg
    Made it 3 bikes ago when that same thing happened. Was near a freeway offramp so I searched around till I found a matching nut and bolt with a thick straight piece of aluminium with holes at the ends that I banged into the right shape with my wrench :D. Works so good I've kept it.
     
  20. JunkyardDog

    JunkyardDog Active Member

    The Cranbrook frame is pretty strong, the wheels are junk. And using a rag joint doesn't help. No wheel should be driven with the spokes, especially a cheap crappy one. Do you have a caliper brake in the front? If not, that is the cause of the problem. I would NEVER ride a motorized bike without a good front brake. The rear brake doesn't matter that much, about 90% of the stopping power is in the front brake.
     
Loading...