Mounting Skyhawk GT-5 to Huffy Cranbrook

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by 22Velocity, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. 22Velocity

    22Velocity New Member

    Greetings from Virginia beach, Va.

    I'm building my first ever bike & need some of your expert advise....
    I am attempting to mount a Grubee Skyhawk GT-5 on a Huffy Cranbrook
    beach cruiser, It has the fat down tube & the engine mount will not go over the tube, the kit comes with a bracket that requires that a hole be drilled through the tube, now quite honestly (being that this is my 1st build) I am a tad nervouse about drilling "true & straight" & having the engine exacly where it needs to be after the hole is drilled & it is mounted .
    I'll take all the advise your willing to offer in helping me to achieve my goal of having the engine in line with the rear drive sprocket & a centered drill hole thats straight & true..
    I hope this post is'nt overly long winded & hope to get some great feedback
    soon !!
    Thx:sweatdrop:
     

  2. BAM

    BAM Member

    dont dill lots of stuff you can do i squized the frame bought longer front studs wraped old inner tube around frame lot of venders sell front mounts to take a c clamp smash frame down a little and there you are
     
  3. 22Velocity

    22Velocity New Member

    Smashing the tube ?

    Thanks for replying BAM,
    Why do you recomend not drilling ? If I choose to go the smash route can I ask what you used to smash the frame ? I'm totally new to this so maybe someone could recomend a vendor that sells alterative mounts to simplify. :detective:
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2010
  4. 22Velocity

    22Velocity New Member

    UPDATE :
    I have just eaten my first piece of humble pie....
    After actually reading through several threads on here ALAS I have realized
    that they actually make a universal adapter engine mount that does not require
    a hole being drilled "the U-bolt universal adapter" ! Now i am feeling a bit ignorant
    for jumping into posting a thread without doing the research first, its sorta like living
    next to the Fla. everglades & jumping into your swiming pool at night without first checking for gators, your already wet & your A** has done been bit !
    Now I fully understand why "Motoredbikes.com" insisted on placing the tag of
    "Newbie" next to my handle ! lol
     
  5. slaquers

    slaquers Member

    Where do I find this U BOLT adapter thing I need it I have 2 cranbrooks and been running with just studs on frame which is bad but I need to know how to make or get this adapter. Thanks.
     
  6. 22Velocity

    22Velocity New Member

    U bolt adapter

    I got mine from sickbikeparts.com
     
  7. slaquers

    slaquers Member

    Hm I just drilled it ;/


    BUT I still have no coaster brake as I cannot find a good tutorial on how to put it together so I have 2 holes in shoes from braking.

    It doesnt seem to fit with the sprocket on I got no idea...need a CHEAP braking solution...have coaster brake here...just will not go in. Heh.
     
  8. arkives1

    arkives1 Member

    mounting skyhawk gt5 to huffy cranbrook

    First you need to enlarge the hole in the sprocket so it fits over the flange, the sprocket has to go down over the hub to be close to the spokes, second: after you've got that sprocket down you need to bend the brake arm (shaped like a dogleg) with two bends to clear the sprocket and still reach near the frame where the hanger strap attatches. The arm will have a shape sorta like a one piece pedal crank after it's bent. It takes some work to do this, the fit is trial and error until you hit it. I was fortunate to have a friend machine the hole out a bit for me. You can do it with a half round file or a grinder but remember you have to get the sprocket so it doesn't wobble side to side or travel in an oblong orbit around the axle hub. That will cause the chain to loosen and tighten with every revolution of the wheel. If you don't get the sprocket wobble free, it will make keeping the chain on very difficult if not impossible.
    I added caliper brakes to mine as I didn't feel the coaster was adequate stopping power. I don't recall where I got the brakes from but they're readily available.. Get a long throw caliper brake as it must reach around the fender to get the pads to the rim. Hope this helps a bit.
     
  9. Or you could just take off coaster brake arm, remove dust cap and toss,put sprocket on axle where dust cap used to be and put up against the spokes with no rubber,put rubber on other side of spokes,no need to bend brake arm,put wheel back on and done.

    If you don't want to use a coaster brake get a $10 side pull caliper brake for the front fork and mount in hole where front fender mounts to.
     
  10. KCvale

    KCvale Motorized Bicycle Vendor

    Grubee sells the extender kit with longer front studs and a second mount block among other things in it for $15.

    Fit on a Cranbrook nice

    CompareAnimate.gif

    2_1-DoneMotor.jpg

    I just used a big pair of big channel locks to squeeze the fairly thin steel frame so the studs would pass around it.
     
  11. MarkMayhew

    MarkMayhew New Member

    hmm, good idea, squeezing the frame w/channel locks...I think I'm gonna try that, Thanks!
     
  12. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman Active Member

    Buy or make.... [​IMG]......[​IMG]
     
  13. V 35

    V 35 Member

    I dented in my frame tube with a hand held plabisher, similar to a hot rivetter.
    I fixed the battle damage with JB weld, smoothed with sample credit cards. Drop stick
    pens in motor mount holes to create a tunnel, as epoxy dries. For Long studs, I
    used 6" M 6 all thread bolts, and cut excess. For Looks, all welds were moulded with
    JB weld, sanded smooth, primed and painted. Drilling hard alloy steel invites cracks.
     
  14. V 35

    V 35 Member

    I used a large Ball Peen Hammer after marking the metal, sand bare first, fill hammer marks with epoxy glue, sand smooth. Both PC 7 and JB Weld have good sanding qualities. Some epoxies sand poorly, I'd test on a scrap of wood first.
     
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