Springer Fork

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by KDC1956, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. KDC1956

    KDC1956 Member

    Well today my springer fork came in man was I happy thought it was going to be easy to install.
    Well it was not lol I had to cut part of the tube off to get it to fit just right I did not know you had to do this but I do recall seeing that some where that you had to cut it a little man was they so right.The hard part is getting it cut right you only get to do it one time if you screw up then you will have to reorder again.I got lucky I got mine cut right the first time Weeeeeee.
    I think I told ever one here thats its going to be all chrome and have red white and blue tires.
    I want to post pic asap but I need a new camera first but I will try with the one I have first when I think its time its a lot harder than I thought it was going to be on building my own trike but I am having fun learning.My wife said this bike/trike was going to look pretty cool I hope it will but any how you look at it when all said and done it will be my own and maybe my lasy bike/trike to ever build.Who knows.:dunce:
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008

  2. upshifter

    upshifter Member

    I'm building a motored bike using a "Giant Iguana" mountain bike. It's nearly like new, but 8 or 10 years old. It is solid, but is not a springer. A guy in a bicycle shop gave me some springer forks from a "Mongoose XR-75". They are as good as new, but I will have to cut them down about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch to fit my Giant. I'm still not sure the stem is the right diameter, and I may have to change the handlebars, too.

    In the past I used to cut the fork stem down by first screwing a nut on it, then using the nut as a guide when I make the cut. Then, when the nut is backed off, it trues up the threads where I made the cut. Some times I put a drop of oil
    on the fork stem and screw the nut back and forth where I made the cut. Anyway, here is a picture of the forks. I haven't made the cut yet. Those are heavy forks, and if I were to ride the bike without installing the motor, I wouldn't think of using them on my bike.:sweatdrop:

    (Notice how the brake bracket serves as a fork brace. I like that.)

    KDC1956, let us know how you make out with your forks. I'll be glad to see your trike. It sounds like a nice idea with many possibilities. Also, what are your springer forks like? Thanks for posting about your project.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 24, 2008
  3. KDC1956

    KDC1956 Member

    My Springer Fork

    This is only a pic of the springer fork that I had to cut down.I am still working on getting real pic of my trike build hope I can get some before the new year comes in.This is only a pic of the springer I have trying to get some real pic for all to look at soon.Merry Christmas to all and a Happy New Year to all.
     

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    Last edited: Dec 25, 2008
  4. KDC1956's fork is of the girling fork design but commonly known as a springer. Upshifter's is commonly known as "suspension fork" and is not a springer. Just to help you guy's avoid future confusion.
    The fork on my avatar bike is an actual springer.
     
  5. upshifter

    upshifter Member

    FireBellyCycles, thanks for the clarification; I needed that. I'm new to MAB.
     
  6. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    That is a telescopic suspension fork as opposed to a springer. They are very good if you don't buy the really cheap ones. One with about 60-65mm of travel is about right on a cruiser frame and won't make the front sit up too high. A good guide is to look for one with an alloy crown - not steel which rusts - and fittings for V-brake & disc. Strong springs are better for a motored bike.
    Does anyone know of a springer that would fit on a 7" long headtube x 1&1/8" diameter?
     
  7. upshifter

    upshifter Member

    Irish John, thank you for the good information. You're right about looking for an alloy crown. I live less than a half mile from the beach, and have a perpetual battle against rust. The kit I ordered claims to have a black muffler, not chrome. That suits me just fine, because paint holds up better around here than chrome. It's a lot easier to paint the muffler with Barbecue Black or engine paint from a rattle can than to fight with rust.

    Paste wax applied with some "fine" steel wool seems to work well on rusty chrome around here, and it lasts for awhile. But, the rust takes over in a matter of time. Also, aluminum is attacked by the salt air, usually engine cases and cooling fins. I try to spray them with clear lacquer from a spray can. That helps, but it has to be done regularly.

    After a ride down the coast highway, I try to wash the bike down with clear water to get the salt off. There is 8 miles of gentle sandy beach down the hill from me; and I see people riding bikes on the beach. I would never do that. If the salt doesn't ruin something, then the sand will. Not good.
     
  8. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    Uplifter, I too live by the beach but I wipe my bike a lot with a rag soaked in parrafin. I also spray "Linox" on all the brightwork - hubs, rims, spokes, stem, bars etc and that protects them from rust although it collects dirt. Even if I wipe the dirt off the Linox spray still seems to protect the bike. I clean my chrome exhaust every day with an oily rag and it too stays bright.
    Riding on the beach is for mugs because chains and cogs hate sand not tp bention bearings- even dirt roads are bad on a bike. Linox has lanolin in it and it is available from bike shops. I reckon it's great stuff but so is the old kerosene which I find great for cleaning my whitewall tyres. I ysed to let my bike get dirty but now I'm obsessively clean about it. I think I got more respect for the bike when I gave up using those pathetic 2-stroke HTs and switched to the HS and then to Honda motors. I'd never go back to the HT because they are just such total crud even with a shifter kit. Why waste a good shifter kit on an HT.
    The shifter kit is a great idea but the engines they are made for are a disgrace to engineering.
     
  9. upshifter

    upshifter Member

    Irish John, Thank you again for the good information. Anything that fights corrosion is valuable information around here.
     
  10. redpiper777

    redpiper777 Member

  11. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    There are a couple of forks there with that can fit a longer headtube but as far as I'm aware there isn't any springer with brake bosses and a bike with no front brake is of no use to me. I need to be able to stop occasionally.
    If it wasn't for the lack of brake regulations in the US every springer would have brakes. The quality also looks a bit iffy - especially on that Monark fork.
     
  12. mabman

    mabman Member

    While I agree that the cheap springer forks are suspect for the added demands of MABing you can use a drum hub front brake with a springer or any front fork.
     
  13. I like my monark fork and I run a Sturmey drum front brake. The problem I have w/ the monark is that it took me several hours of work to mount and tune; it was not straight, head tube is too long, threads don't go far enough and it was set up for a really narrow hub.
     
  14. Irish John

    Irish John Guest

    I have 2 questions:
    Is the front drum brake any good? Is it weak as water like the coaster?
    How good is that Monark on a Grubee 4-stroke at speed? The springs look really bad.
     
  15. mabman

    mabman Member

    There are no springs without dampeners that will perform well at 35 mph. Those forks are pretty much for looks IMHO. I have had drum brakes and they can be tuned to work well enough but are no match for a V brake or Disc.

    If its looks your after go with the lowrider/retro stuff, if it is performance then get with the modern telescopic forks which are cheap enough and readily available all over and most mate up to disc brakes also. There are a few oddball models out there however if that is your thing.
    DSC00509.JPG
     
  16. I agree about the forks; they are for looks and they will not (I expect) perform well at 35 mph (compared to telescopic). They are by no means compareable performancewise to modern telescopics but they look cool and they perform better than the BMX style ones that came w/ the bike IMHO.

    The drum is a completely different brake than a V or a disc. I have little experience w/ disc bicycle brakes (I know there are good and bad and inbetween) and V brakes are good but not very linear.

    I like the drum because it looks cool, performs well and was designed for heavier loads than most other bicycle brakes. It is very linear w/ no real lock up point. I have almost 20 yrs of avid motorcycling and 30 yrs of avid bicycling behind me and I think the Sturmey Archer front drum is an excellent brake.

    mabman that is a formidable girling fork in that jpeg!

    I plan on making my own dampened girling or springer in the near future as well. Vintage style of course!
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2009
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