My woodruff key fell out???

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by commanderroach1999, Oct 1, 2016.

  1. I opened up the crank case and in the purple grease I found a woodruff key. What is it? What does it do? Can I go without it? If not how to I reinstall it? I will try to attach a photo but it says low memory.
     

  2. Frankenstein

    Frankenstein Active Member

    Forget the picture. When you say crankcase I hope you don't mean you took the cylinder off and removed the clutch gears and magneto magnet and split the case. If you did and you found purple grease and a Woodruff key then return to sender and buy from a new vendor.

    Now I can only assume that by finding any grease (of the purple variety I don't know why but it's probably better than stock) you mean you opened the clutch gear side (right side if siting on bike) and found a Woodruff key. Well it's either a spare part (possible with Chinese quality control, consider yourself lucky it didn't get in the gears and turn them to mush) or its a key that unless you're finding slippage a problem shouldn't be investigated too far. The key is almost arbitrary since the shaft and mating gear is held in place by a taper along with friction pressure via a bolt or nut.

    If it's under the clutch gear area pull just the small bevel gear. If the Woodruff key is missing then install it and tighten the bolt back down again, if you have it off I recommend replacing with a hex bolt instead of the flathead screw bolt, it's usually the same thread as the magneto magnet nut.

    I recommend to do just the small gear since it turns counter clockwise, without a key it has the potential to loosen the bolt and stop the motor from pulling anything, on the large side the nut is automatically tightening the clutch onto the tapered shaft during use, so it becoming a problem is far less likely.

    It's very possible that the Woodruff key is an unexplained mistake, if found worse elsewhere, including a part of a completely distorted washer and a part of a zip tie inside of the magneto cover, it was making the bike discharge its cdi too soon and making a loud popping sound as an effect. The zip tie is still unknown to what and how it may of been involved.
     
    Nate888 likes this.
  3. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    purple grease may also be found around the drive sprocket on left side, if you have the puller tool, it would be good to check all 4 keys to be sure they are there
     
  4. Holly

    Holly Member

    Sometimes the woodruff key, small bevel, stays put for weeks and sometimes it will pop out twice in a day. I super glue it back in place everytime. I have ordered new woodruff keys but going forward is there a better way to keep it in there? It's become a quick fix I've fixed it so many times now but I'm wondering if there's a trick I don't yet know about?
     
  5. Frankenstein

    Frankenstein Active Member

    Well either the key is too small, the keyway too big, or the bevel gear isn't seating properly, if left unchecked it can destroy the taper on the shaft and you'll need to replace the entire crankshaft... It happened to me unfortunately but now I'm much more careful.
     
    Holly likes this.
  6. Holly

    Holly Member

    I'm still using the original key it came with, but maybe at this point from wear the sizing has changed. I'll see what happens with the new keys. But it sounds like I might need to replace that setup. How about loctite? Is that stronger than superglue? I'll also double check the bevel when next assemble it.
     
  7. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    if it came out once and spun a lot, the shaft may be too small now or there may be a ridge worn into it that doesn't allow the gear to seat all the way down - these both can be a hard fix
     
    Holly likes this.
  8. Holly

    Holly Member

    I'm shopping for a new crankshaft. Is there an upgraded version I should use over a replacement of the same stock part? Any recommendations would be appreciated.
     
  9. I would recommend replacing all the parts with high performance parts according to ur budget.
     
  10. Holly

    Holly Member

    High performance is secondary to running in general and safety. Got brakes yet?
     
  11. Yes I just have to install them
     
  12. Holly

    Holly Member

    Glad to hear that!
     
  13. butre

    butre Well-Known Member

    in that case, get out there and install them before you even think of getting it running again
     
  14. Frankenstein

    Frankenstein Active Member

    Wait wait wait.. You're shopping for a crankshaft? You understand that means you'll be splitting a crank case right? Shop for new case gaskets, crank seals, cylinder gaskets, and probably new main bearings while you're at it. Also get ready to have problems getting parts apart and together. Make sure you brush up on your knowledge of engine geometries, your piston will match about half the crankshafts available, the other half will not.

    I should also say that 95% of the "performance" parts are not anywhere close to performance parts. It all falls down to specifically tuning the motor for the power you want or need. On the carburetor side you are limited to the amount of fuel and air that can physically be sucked in by the size of the intake manifold. You are also limited by the amount of burnt gas and air you can get out at a given speed. You can push too much out, or too little, both hurt power when not tuned. The best Mikuni carburetor available money can buy will be a few hundred times worse than a stock carb if you tune it wrong. Think size 120 jet when size 85 is already too much. Size 55 will probably set the engine on fire but it will run fast, so fast you can take the spark plug wire off and it will keep running (yes, I've had this happen and it's a bit scary I'll admit)

    Also I have not heard of a performance crankshaft but if it's on ebay it's probably the largest load of horse sh*t to hit the Internet yet. Crankshafts to be technically tuned, must be balanced with your piston and rod and such, refer to jaguar on this.

    I guess the point is invest in tools and time, not toys and shiny things. In all honesty if you can get about 100 dollars of simple tools you will be able to bring just about any motor into its fullest life and strength. You just need to spend time measuring twice, cutting once, and actually feeling the results and not the charm of money or even worse, buyers remorse. Take roach for example, his performance cdi actually made his bike run worse. Why? Well maybe because it's not really performance as much as it was labeled performance. It performed worse than stock because it was designed to look better than stock rather than being designed to perform better. It was also an imitation of a better product that actually does improve performance, but for half the price of the real deal why not take a $35 risk. Right?

    Sorry I get worked up when somebody puts a shiny sticker on something and claims it's better. It's like a Styrofoam cooler. Put an NFL team on the side and stick a shiny sticker on it and all a sudden it goes from being a 2 dollar cooler to a 14 dollar cooler. I don't know how but if it really cost them 12 dollars for a quarter sized sticker and a picture of an eagle printed on the side then I suggest they ask me to make them for only 10 dollars a piece. I can print a full color image for about 3 cents, and I can get a sparkly sticker for about half a cent, and I can charge them a whopping 10 dollars for it even though it doesn't make the caller keep anything cooler than the other cooler! I know! Let's stick a sticker that says performance cooler on the side of the cooler, and charge an extra5 dollars, just tell everyone it keeps then cooler longer because it's a performance cooler! aaahahahahahahahahaha! I'm going to be rich!
     
  15. butre

    butre Well-Known Member

    I'm not aware of any place to get a "performance" crank, especially not for your 48cc. cr machine has built 66cc bottom ends with some pretty nicely balanced balanced cranks that offer more primary compression if that's your jam
     
  16. Holly

    Holly Member

    I wasn't looking for "performance" rather longevity. From the get go I've read that some parts on these cheap little engines are better upgraded. I was inquiring for info on if there was a better after market part.

    Like I said in my other comment keeping it running is the main goal, more consistently of possible. I'm looking at this as a winter project and though I have a multitude of tools I'm in agreement that it's likely there will be something I need for this project.

    I'm also in agreement that shiny doesn't mean better. I'm a very practical gal.
     
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