Need Advice (want to modify a MTB)

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by locksmith, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    Hey everyone, I'm a long time scooter guy (gopeds, bladez gas scooters) ready to party with a motorized bike.

    I looked at the staton kits a long time ago and want a new toy so here I am. :tt1: :ack2: :idea:


    Here's the bike I want to mod. It's a 2005 Raleigh M80
    [​IMG]

    As for the motor, I've had good experiences with Tanaka.

    This is what I'm looking at:

    http://www.staton-inc.com/store/pro...ka_35_cc_1_60_hp_Two_Cycle_Engine-331-13.html

    Would these two work together? Looking to mount this together. I can take pics if necessary

    I'm a total n00b at modding these, but it seems the staton is well liked. My other concern is the bike has disc brakes... Do I need to get different ones?

    Thanks.
     

  2. Dankoozy

    Dankoozy Member

    Disc brakes should be grand - the roller pushing down on the tyre will also help slow you down. You might need different tyres (semi slick). I'd go for a 4 stroke engine myself, no need to worry about it not getting oil if you do engine braking on a steep descent
     
  3. locksmith

    locksmith Member

  4. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    As far as the bike goes, the recent raleigh mbs don't say much to me, but
    I have an '89 technuim bike I love. I think a Tanaka is definitely the right
    choice. I recently put a Tanaka PF 4000 on my friction kit and I was blown
    away by the performance. You should get the 40 cc though, not the 35.
    It's well worth it. I noticed the price shown in your attachment is way more
    than what I currently see on staton's sight. the price I see for the 4000
    is $349. Get the 40cc, awesome. I've had a lot of engines. this one's pricy,
    but it's the best yet.
    Dan's right about the tires, the 4000 will rip the knobs right off a knobby
    tire. I don't have the model off the top of my head, but Kenda makes
    one with a smooth middle and knobs at the outside edges. It has a flat
    profile that allows more surface to roller contact, hence more grip.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2013
  5. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    Dude that's exactly what I ordered :) The reason it's more is because it includes the kit.
    http://www.staton-inc.com/store/pro..._39_8_cc_2_2_hp_Two_Cycle_Engine-1250-13.html

    I went with this because I live in a fairly hilly area and need the extra power to get my ass up the hills lol

    One thing, The disc brake caliper (in red) sticks out and I'm concerned it will interfere with the piece that attaches below to support the motor
    IMAG0835.jpg
     
  6. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    You can use a few washers to space out the support if needed, you can tweak the support rod also. Remember its aluminum, no sharp bends just a gradual one. Congrats on your new ride.
     
  7. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Yeah, what he said; you'll probly need a bit longer bolt,
    but it looks to be an easy mod. Sry 'bout the price confusion.
    I hope you got the big roller. You're in for some serious fun.
    no need at all to bend the support, just use a spacer to move
    it out a little.
     
  8. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    UPDATE***

    Got the kit today, but the bike is still not together yet cause of 2 problems.

    The first is the hole on the bike for the middle screw is obstructed, so the screw doesn't fit.

    IMAG0859.jpg

    Should I just drill through it?

    Second is my concern is confirmed, the disc brake sticks out too far, so tomorrow, I'm gonna buy a longer screw and spacer. Is this all I need?

    I anticipate buying between 1.75"-2.5" screws and a few spacers at home depo

    The only other thing I foresee going wrong is the support rod will now be too far apart at the top and will not mount to the quick release on the motor. What should I do if this happens?

    Can I extend it somehow?

    Thanks in advance

    They do taper inward, but it looks like the mount is pretty narrow.
     
  9. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Just mount above the hole. "Important": Use a cut up tube or old tire
    between the frame and the mounting brackets on both sides of the frame.
    You can punch holes for the bolts thru the rubber with a hot screwdriver.
    This will protect the paint, but more importantly it dampen vibration &
    protect the frame as well as keeping the bracket from slipping. DO NOT
    over\ tighten the bracket bolts & crush the tubing!
    As far as the struts are concerned, there should be spacers with the kit,
    one long for inside the channel, two short on either side to go between
    the channel & the strut, the skewer running thru them.
    P.S. Mounting above the cross piece the center bolt will keep the bracket
    from slipping down. Drilling the cross piece can only weaken it.
    You could extent the strut a bit, but that shouldn't be necessary. It's
    okay if they slant in a little I've welded extra corners inside the corners of my
    bracket that really solid the whole thing up cuz my trailer mount is on the
    channel.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2013
  10. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    WHOA, did you get a kit with a single support rod or
    two flat slotted aluminum struts? Okay just checked
    Staton's site to be sure; go to 3. friction kits. Then
    click 76mm friction kit. the is a picture looking from directly
    behind the bike that show exactly how the struts mount.
    Geesh! now you know why iI like old school mtn. bikes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2013
  11. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    He could mount the channel 3 bolt holder just above the cross brace. Gives you more options to get it just right, especially straight and level when the roller is pressed right against the tire. Just moving it up or down a few mm gives you a lot of adjustment. Using that center cross member locks your adjustment options to only a twisting motion.
     
  12. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    THX, Darwin, I just explained all that in the previous posts.
     
  13. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    OOPS , some times I just chime in without reading all the posts. Sorry if I repeated something.
     
  14. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    Ohh, I was totally under the impression I had to put the screw through that one hole. I will just mount it above now. Thanks.
     
  15. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Darwin, that's cool; I forgot to mention the importance of keeping it straight,
    centered, and level across the tire. Sometimes one has to cut custom spacers to do that.
     
  16. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    UPDATE 2**

    Thanks everyone for the help. It's almost done. Turns out the two holes for the rods are metric 5m, so I had to buy different size bolts. Who knew how much is metric in the US? It's a lot easier than all the numbers 1.75, 3/16. 7/16, etc...

    I just gotta connect the kill switch and mount the throttle. Is there any way I can expand the kill switch bracket? As of now, the only way it fits on the handle bars is upside down
     
  17. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    pics

    Wlnpl4J.jpg hcR6xUT.jpg xa6F6pK.jpg AuOEnDq.jpg (i want to improve the kill switch to make it upright)
     
  18. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    Hmm? You have the screw going down into the switch. Try taking it out'
    inverting switch, and, with both tabs pointing straight down, run the screw thru
    the holes, not into the bar. You may need a slightly longer screw, but a longer
    screw is always more fun anyway.:whistling:

    P.S. At some point, you might want to upgrade to a twist grip throttle;
    I hate trigger throttles. You.re gonna have some real fun with that engine.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2013
  19. rawly old

    rawly old Member

    I was looking at the tire you're running in back. Dankoozy
    made a good point about running a semi-slick tire. These
    tires are more or less slick in the middle, knobbed at the edge.
    More importantly, they have a flat profile that has more contact
    with the roller than a tire with a curved profile. They run from
    $10 to $50+. I run a Kenda Kross Plus 26" x 1.95", about $15 +shpg.
    They all look something like this, but the only down side is that
    they're known to break loose if one tries too radical a turn on wet
    pavement. The Kenda has done a pretty good job of addressing
    this with slight modifications.
     

    Attached Files:

  20. locksmith

    locksmith Member

    LOL. That's a good idea. I will try that, I may have to bend it though. If not, I will just ethopian engineer it with a zip tie.

    The throttle is pretty awkward (with brakes and shifters already there) so I may change it. I'm kinda used to these cause I've ridden scooters for so long.

    I thought a lot about the tires, and if this one sucks, I'll swap it. The treads are really close together, so it's not like a knobby tire.
     
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