1910 HD replica engine?

rusty.western.flyer

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Something like a Briggs FB or FC is going to be what you're looking for, they are rare but there out there. Id even go as far as a Model B if you can find one.
Valve seats are soft, typically running leaded fuels. Still like the styling, and may be able to scrounge up enough to make a runner of these. Appears to be in the $3-500 range for a semi-working engine.
 

DieselTech

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Valve seats are soft, typically running leaded fuels. Still like the styling, and may be able to scrounge up enough to make a runner of these. Appears to be in the $3-500 range for a semi-working engine.
Well you got machining equipment, you can install hardened valve seats, more than likely that will have to be done anyhow.
 

mark20

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Yeah, the FB was made in the 1920s-28 (if you wanted more "authentic" this engine match's the time period) , FC was essentially the same engine but made in the early 30s (might have better luck finding this as it was more mass produced) the model B is the 1940s version of the FB (more modernized)

You can get leaded fuel from your local airport if valve issues are a concern
 

rusty.western.flyer

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Well you got machining equipment, you can install hardened valve seats, more than likely that will have to be done anyhow.
Correct. That was my first thought at a pre-72 engine, never-mind it's an "equipment" engine.
Yeah, the FB was made in the 1920s-28, FC was essentially the same engine but made in the early 30s (might have better luck finding this as it was more mass produced) the model B is the 1940s version of the FB (more modernized)

You can get leaded fuel from your local airport if valve issues are a concern
Yes, I have a 76 fuel near by. I can get anything from jet fuel to c16. It's just better to machine the seats, and change to aluminum pistons if they already don't have. A lot of old school engines have iron pistons. Ponder that....
 

Wrench

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Well you got machining equipment, you can install hardened valve seats, more than likely that will have to be done anyhow.
IMO its best to run it as is first, of course do a valve job if needed,
If it develops serious valve recession then it's time to install some valve seats
When the cyl was made the cast iron has probably been hardened in the valve seat area .020" or '030" deep
It's when a few valve jobs have been done and the first .020" of metal has been removed when the valve seats start to have recession
 

Chainlube

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Correct. That was my first thought at a pre-72 engine, never-mind it's an "equipment" engine.

Yes, I have a 76 fuel near by. I can get anything from jet fuel to c16. It's just better to machine the seats, and change to aluminum pistons if they already don't have. A lot of old school engines have iron pistons. Ponder that....
Not pre 72 or even pre 02 but looks a lot like what you're after. Check the photos in this build.
 

Wrench

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Sadly that's what ruined alot of old M/C with intergral valve seats
When Unleaded gas came everyone freaked out and thought the unleaded gas would hurt their valves and seats
People rushed to have hardened valve seats installed, Only to have their new valve seats pop out. Ruining their head or cyl

What they did not realize is that their intergral valve seats were hardened and had a layer of lead build up on them from years of burning regular leaded gas this protected the seats and valves. They didn't need to have valve seats installed.

Today if ya want leaded gas it can be bought at your local small airport AV LL 100 it's like leaded gas from the 60s
 

rusty.western.flyer

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I've been modifying cylinder heads for a couple decades, as a living. Cast iron typically has the valve seats machined right into the head. Cast iron is hard, but brittle. Chips easily. Flat heads tend to build a lot of heat on the seats, combine that with leaded fuel, and it works, but don't expect them to last on modern fuel. Unleaded fuel needs cast iron at a minimum. If the head casting is aluminum, you need to press fit hardened seats.
 

rusty.western.flyer

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Sadly that's what ruined alot of old M/C with intergal valve seats
When Unleaded gas came everyone freaked out and thought the unleaded gas would hurt their valves and seats
People rushed to have hardened valve seats installed, Only to have their new valve seats pop out. Ruining their head or cyl

What they did not realize is that their intergal valve seats were hardened and had a layer of lead build up on them from years of burning regular leaded gas this protected the seats and valves. They didn't need to have valve seats installed.

Today if ya want leaded gas it can be bought at your local small airport AV LL 100 it's like leaded gas from the 60s
Local friend is trying to convert his vintage flat head car from cast iron pistons to aluminum. The intention is to harden the seats (or machine and press hardened), swap the iron to aluminum pistons, and add EFI.
 
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