Big Problem, Better Solution

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by Masor, Oct 28, 2010.

  1. Masor

    Masor Member

    Attached Files:


  2. SimpleSimon

    SimpleSimon Active Member

    Copy/paste of that linked address just gives SpookyTooth's front page.
     
  3. Masor

    Masor Member

  4. reb1

    reb1 Member

    There are several things that cause spokes to break. On cheap hubs the flange is to thin and it knives the spokes. This is a common problem on non motorized bicycles with strong riders. Thicker spokes can help. Having at least 36 spokes is also better. Having a freewheel mounted gear on the hub will also reduce wear.
     
  5. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    I am using a 36hole Alex double wide rim with 12g spokes and a Hi-stop coaster hub. The motor cog is mounted right on the hub (file inner hole to fit) with one rubber washer on the inside of the spokes. So far so good, almost a year.

    www.niagaracycle.com
     
  6. reb1

    reb1 Member

    It all has to do with what the wheel was setup for. I purchased my tandem in 1990. It came with 36 spoked wheels on suzie tandem hubs. The rear hub had a chrommolly solid axle. I could not get five miles up a canyon before I had a bent axle or broken spokes at the hub on the drive side. The first month was a nightmare. The hub flange on the suzie hubs was below .050 thick. I ordered in Phil Wood tandem hubs 48 spoked. The flange on these hubs is around .100 thick. The axle is oversized and made from hardened SS. They are quick release. I have never had a bent axle on these hubs or a broken spoke. I use 14ga spokes. Because of the weight of two riders the rims develop stress cracks but this usually does not happen until they are around 3 years old. The steel hubs shells that are on coaster and some geared hubs usually have thin flanges. This has to do with the cost of the equipment to form or cut the metal. You can keep spoke breakage down by having the 12, 11 or even 10ga spokes. Another thing that can help is to make sure the neck of the spoke is snug against the flange. If there is space between the hub flange so that the spoke does not hit the flange it can twist back in forth under stress and cause the spoke to break. You can use machine washers to take up this space. A #2 machine washer will fit the 14ga spokes.
     
  7. machiasmort

    machiasmort Active Member

    Good tip Reb, it's actually a bearing surface because the metals rub there! Another good way is to tir them together with copper wire and solder the spokes where they "X". There's an entire thread on that somewhere on this site!

    That's what I like about this site, In a World where cheaper is better and employers demand more with less, we get the honest skinny on things!

    Hey, Happy, thank your boy MM here for putting the squeez on them in the Falls! They are right around the corner from me and seemed geared to take care of us the customer, believe it or not! You guy's will be hearing a lot more about Niagara Cycle on here!
     
  8. reb1

    reb1 Member

    I build my tandem wheels 4 cross. I weave the spokes so they cross at the 3rd and 4th position. It takes more time stressing the wheel as you are finishing but they stay straight. I don't do this on high flange hubs.
     
  9. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

  10. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    re: 4 cross. Yes, that is the strongest way.

    I use a pair of ground smooth lineman's dykes to hold the spoke when making final spoke adjustments, to prevent spoke wind up. It takes a while, but avoids "pinging" or breakage. You can do the same for <$5 by wrapping a pair of cheap pliers with electrical tape on the jaws, and using rubber bands for a spring to close them (open with fingers 1 handed, will close, then clamp down with fingers=fast)
     
  11. Sgt. Howard

    Sgt. Howard Member

    Spoke adjustment

    There's an old gunsmithing trick that comes to mind here. You know that plastic handle goop that allows you to put vinyl handles on cheap tools? Just open the can, dip the handles and call it good... that stuff? Well, take a pair of slip-joint pliers and dip the JAWS and let that set with the jaws open... it's how we gunsmiths set flatsprings like on flintlocks without buggering them up. Also good on leafsprings on Peacemakers and similar single action handguns, or anywhere that you need a strong, soft grip. I would grip with the serrations of the jaws parrallel to the spoke, less likely to mar the spoke that way and you can use another section of the jaws as the vinyl wears through. If that doesn't give you enough traction, remove the vinyl and use horsehide glue to pad the jaws with 12oz leather- once the glue has set (24 hrs) dust them up with bow rosin... yes, fiddlebow rosin... and see if that don't work.
    the Old Sgt.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  12. ibdennyak

    ibdennyak Guest

    Heh, I can understand how the Ole Sergeant would know about guns....but how did you find out about fiddles?????:detective::grin5:
     
  13. Sgt. Howard

    Sgt. Howard Member

    Tricks of the trade

    - the fiddle rosin on leather trick is how gunsmiths did it before the days of dip-it-yourself vinyl. I apprenticed in 1965 at age 11... but then again, Uncle Clarence taught me to play fiddle, Mandolin and Banjo. Uncle Claude tried to teach me Guitar, but I learned far more from other sources. Grandma taught me harmonica. Grampa taught me rope bass. My Mother's side of the family hails from Podunk Hollow ('Hollar') Tennessee... they ain't no flatlanders. I've been in a few bluegrass/country/folk/old rock bands and call my venue "American Dirt". Now if I could just do a BOB trailer for my instruments ...
    the Old Sgt.
     
  14. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    (Dan Mitchell/Murray Kellum)

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    I remember down in Houston we were puttin' on a show
    When a cowboy in the back stood up and yelled, "Cotton-Eyed Joe"!
    He said, "We love what you're doin', boys don't get us wrong
    There's just somethin' missin' in your song"

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    So we dusted off our boots and put our cowboy hats on straight
    Them Texans raised the roof when Jeff opened up his case
    You say y'all all wanna two-step
    You say ya wanna doe-si-doe
    Well, here's your fiddlin' song before we go

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band
    That lead guitar is hot but not for "Lousiana Man"
    So rosin up that bow for "Faded Love" and let's all dance
    If you're gonna play in Texas, you gotta have a fiddle in the band

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YxYfrPaAZ4 Bob Wills is still the king!
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2010
  15. Sgt. Howard

    Sgt. Howard Member

    ???huh???

    ... all these years I thought it was," ya gotta have a POODLE in the band..."
    Sgt. Howard:jester:
     
  16. Fabian

    Fabian Well-Known Member

    It's interesting to hear of people breaking spokes. My bike uses a base model Quando hub and standard sized spokes.
    In 40,000 kilometers of riding, over 3 years (most of it hauling heavy loads), i have "never" broken a spoke.

    I don't understand how people break spokes if the wheel is correctly tensioned?
     
  17. Ludwig II

    Ludwig II Member

    Perhaps that's what Lighnin Hopkins meant when he sang "Let me play with your poodle."
     
  18. mainstreet

    mainstreet New Member

    A clamshell hub adaptor is the best solution. 001.jpg
     
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