Brakes left or right?

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by wally, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. wally

    wally Member

    Okay, got me an elderly second hand GT, rear brake activated with the right hand grip. Also got 2 new Chinese "Dunlop" and "Spalding" Bikes Front brake on right hand side. So which one is standard? Note: I don't ask which is correct! :) Because for me either hand could be correct.

    Thanks
     

  2. motorpsycho

    motorpsycho Active Member

    normally on a bicycle, the rear brake is on the right side, and the front brake (or clutch ) is on the left.
     
  3. retromike3

    retromike3 Member

    Right? right!

    The way I always have had it is the right hand brake is the back But, the more powerful brake is the one on the front. Over sixty percent of your braking force is with the front brake, so there are quite a few folks who set there bike up the other way. My fixed gear bike has only a front brake and I have it set up right hand brake. The only problem I find is that if I come to a panic situation and I grab really hard, I wind up looking at the pavement.(I didn't say eating the pavement.)

    mike
     
  4. wally

    wally Member

    Thanks, On my Suzuki 400, Don't touch the front brake in the wet! I have forgotten if bicycles are the same.
     
  5. darwin

    darwin Well-Known Member

    You should keep it standard because theres times you do not want to use the front brake and in a panic get them mixed up.
     
  6. wally

    wally Member

    Darwin, That was my reason for asking, thanks.
     
  7. happycheapskate

    happycheapskate Active Member

    I think only Americans put the rear brake on the right hand side. It started in the 1980's when some people sued Murray or Huffy because their kid grabbed a big handful of brake and endoed. The excuse is also made that Americans drive on the right, so cyclists signal with the left hand . True, but most people with any cycling skill use the right/front brake for everything except trimming speed or braking on loose surfaces.

    I run all my bikes with the RH/F combo, and train new cyclists this way.
     
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