Is it a Moped or not? In Florida??

Discussion in 'Laws, Legislation & Emissions' started by Homosassa Viking, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. Well, here's what I know about mopeds in Florida:
    A moped is, by Florida definition, a motor-assisted pedal bicycle having 50cc or less engine, able to travel on level ground no faster than 30mph. In particular the bicycle must be fully functional pedal-only and the engine side may not have multiple gears. A clutch is OK if it's used only to disconnect the engine - not for shifting. An operator's license (learner's permit minimum) is required to ride a moped on public highways. No moped registration is required or available.
    A motorcycle, on the other hand, may have gears and is powered by more than 50cc - and requires a vehicle registration, insurance, eye protection, etc. Mature(?) riders with enough of the right insurance can buy their way out of having to wear a helmet...
    In reality most of our small engines, especially the Chinese ones, have no size markings - so, when confronted by the gendarmes, your moped engine is as big (or as small) as you say it is! Nuff said...

  2. bamabikeguy

    bamabikeguy Active Member

    Another Free Thinker!! :grin: Read Thatdax' post, Motor Assisted Bicycle (MAB) needs to be the agreed upon "legalese".

    My "helmet" is a Stihl Hard Hat, bright orange, and probably worthless in a spill, but at least I wouldn't stab myself in the leg like with yours. :cool:

    I'd like a SFGiants batting helmet, but the things are the wrong color for our tropics, heat absobing black.

  3. Truth be known - my viking "Horned War Bonnet" is a Halloween gag gift. The hat part is plastic and the horns are styrofoam. So, it's really useless in a crunch... No worry about stabbing anything! :smile:
  4. V 35

    V 35 Member

    I wear a batting helmet, held with a dog collar, a big step up from my shower cap.
  5. LR Jerry

    LR Jerry Well-Known Member

    Here is your Florida statute:

    (77) MOPED.—Any vehicle with pedals to permit propulsion by human power, having a seat or saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels; with a motor rated not in excess of 2 brake horsepower and not capable of propelling the vehicle at a speed greater than 30 miles per hour on level ground; and with a power-drive system that functions directly or automatically without clutching or shifting gears by the operator after the drive system is engaged. If an internal combustion engine is used, the displacement may not exceed 50 cubic centimeters.

    As you can clearly read no form of a manual clutch is allowed. The law doesn't say a moped can't shift gears it states the operator can't shift gears. One could build a bike like mine which shifts gears automatically. This way you could have multiple gears but still remain legal. You'll need an operators license, registration and insurance to be legal in Florida.
  6. Jello

    Jello New Member

    I've been lurking for quite some time here. I've finally decided to make a 2nd account after forgetting my first one's username and pass. Anyway to get things straigh, I've been pulled over many times in Florida while riding my bike. I have not once been given a ticket, why? Because I present 2 things to the cop, Our florida statue "316.003(77)", along with a document from the DMV. I was screencap it and attach it in a spoiler. The police just read the 2 things and tell me to be safe and I am free to go on my way.

    The bolded underlined part at the bottom is what matters.

  7. sactownie

    sactownie Member

    do you guys realize your replying to a 7 year year old thread? The OP is probably long gone dead from old age!
  8. TREK820

    TREK820 New Member

    just curious, how did you know the op is an old man? or his age?
  9. Gene

    Gene Member

    Great news Kids. The Exhibit F essentially screwing us from getting a registration has been dropped in the latest version of TL 10 as of today. It is pretty clear the new rules allow us to register as Mopeds. Go for it dudes!!!! Read II Section B