Smith "Motor Wheel"...interesting...

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by gone_fishin, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin Guest

    so, i found this pic during a general search...there was no relevant info with it.

    anybody know anything about this one?

    [​IMG]
     

  2. uncle_punk13

    uncle_punk13 Guest

    There were many variations of this type kit from various manufacturers in the teens and twenties. These are now highly collected and valluable in the vintage engine/motor-bike realm.
    Antique-Rider and Psuggmog can probably elaborate better, as i'm not well versed in these...
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Old, funky, unique, expensive. Rough to turn with.
     
  4. This is the engine that started Briggs and Stratton. They bought the rights from Smith, then built their version of the motorwheel for a while, then adapted the same engine to stationary use. I've got one of each, but none of them running. very expensive to restore. The mag on the smith is a special small mag, they go on ebay for no less that $500. My uncle has a running Briggs, the same one he had as a kid in the 30's. He said he could pull another kid on a bike by holding on to the handlebars, up the Good Sam Hospital hill (Rif knows what I mean). If you look close the engine is hinged at the front so there's no problem going around corners.

    Bob
     
  5. Here is the Briggs Motorwheel, they enlarged the bore, and put the magneto in the flywheel, pretty radical for 1920's this one is missing the fender and gas tank [​IMG]
     
  6. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin Guest

    dang, that's cool stuff, antique-rider, thanks a lot :)

    so, how do they engage/disengage?
     
  7. There is no engage or disengage, there is a compression release for srarting and stopping. and of course a throttle.
     
  8. Back in the day you could buy also buy a microcar called the red bug, It was a wood chassis car which was also powered by the smith/briggs motor wheel. These were cheap transportation of the depression era.
     
  9. Blaze

    Blaze Guest

    "so, i found this pic during a general search...there was no relevant info with it.

    anybody know anything about this one?"

    Yeah, it looks like about a 1973 Moto Guzzi Eldorado. Not sure about the bicycle, though. :)
     
  10. gone_fishin

    gone_fishin Guest

    for real? ya picked that out just from that lil bit of detail?
     
  11. Blaze

    Blaze Guest

    Yup. And you can tell it's a civilian model, and not the CHP cruiser because there isn't a crash bar on the back. It could be an Ambassador or an Eldorado - they have the same frame and sheet metal. Judging from the shiny hubs, there is a possibility that it was restored at either Cycle Garden in Huntington Beach, or Moto Guzzi Classics in Long Beach (the hubs aren't polished from the factory, and those guys usually polish their restorations).

    Not that I'm an expert, or anything. I'm just cheating. :)

    [​IMG]

    (this is my OTHER other motorized bike)
     
  12. Guest

    Guest Guest

    MMMMmmm....Moto Guzzi.
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The "other bike" of my dreams- mid '70's Eldorado.

    Red please. With the hard bags and the really good two up seat.

    Nice custom 'ya got there!
     
  14. uncle_punk13

    uncle_punk13 Guest

    Beautiful bike ya' got there Blaze...
    I really like the new Royal Enfields, and Urals, as well as the Guzzi's.
    Maybe one day soon...
     
  15. Guest

    Guest Guest

    RE's and Urals are both more like these motoredbikes in that they need a LOT of TLC and tinkering...the Guzzi's just run and are loved by their owners. :)
     
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