Staton-Inc friction drive review at 50 miles

Discussion in 'Dealer Reviews' started by TWalker, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. TWalker

    TWalker Guest

    It gets a good thumbs up except for 2 things:

    1. The low oil shut off had to be disabled becuase it it shut down the engine on bumps.
    2. It does not freewheel down hills, Staton didn't tell me that but some members here made that claim! It will start freewheeling at between 10-15 MPH when the clutch disnegages. Rolling down long hills at speed the clutch is still engaged and rolls nicely but dont mistake that for freewheeling, the engine is engaged and turning and creating a pull until the clutch disengages.

    I was little dissapointed it didnt come with a kill switch and I think it would be good to show pictures of EXACTLY what comes with the kit.

    But Kudos to Staton on a very fine piece of machinery overall.

    Below is what I posted in another thread about my positive experience with Staton.
     

  2. astring

    astring Member

    My Staton friction drive with Honda gx35 has had no problems.
     
  3. kerf

    kerf Guest

    The Staton friction drive will not freewheel, EVER, unless you raise the drive roller. Freewheeling means zero drag from the drive train. Now, if your talking clutch disengagement, that's another issue and it should happen only when RPM drops. As long as the clutch rotor is turning fast enough to override the springs, it stays engaged, doesn't matter if the engine is turning it or the bikes own inertia.
     
  4. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    I'm surprised your Honda didn't come with a kill switch. How do you turn the engine off?

    You can make your own kill switch to shut off the engine, or just choke the engine.

    FWIW, I have a Staton friction drive and Staton gear chain drive. Even though the chain drive is more effective and freewheeling, friction is simpler and quicker to remove/reinstsll. I like that option of its easy, cheap retrofit.

    5-7
     
  5. kerf

    kerf Guest

    I too have both and your right on target. My wife's running one of my friction drives and won't part with it, lite, simple and quiet.
     
  6. TWalker

    TWalker Guest

    I would disagree to a point. A bicycle freewheel spins one direction, it "freewheels" when the wheel spins faster than the rider moves the drivetrain chain, it is still providing a miniscule amount of drag as the freewheel internals are moving against each other, yet we still refer to it as a freewheel.

    Same thing with an engine,(at least in my head) if the engine disengages I consider that freewheeling.


    If not then there really is no such thing as a true freewheel, there will always be some resistance somehwere even in a bicycle "freewheel gear".

    ugghh..details details....:)
     
  7. kerf

    kerf Guest

    There is also resistance from friction in the wheel bearings and tires, wind resistance, etc, so whats your point? The drag of a drive roller against the tire in very noticeable to me but the drag from the ACS freewheel on my chain drive is not.
     
  8. motman812

    motman812 Member

    I've put 875 miles on my Staton friction drive Honda 35 since December and love it.
     
  9. TWalker

    TWalker Guest


    Your point is a Staton friction never freewheels unless taken of the tire, I just disagree. Yes a friction roller on the tire is more resistance than the internals of bike freewheel but I consider the friction drive freewheeling when the clutch closes the engine no longer turns and bike only has to turn a roller with bearings.

    Wind resistance, tires and bearings play no role in freewheels. But your point is well taken.

    I will agree to disagree. :)
     
  10. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    Let's just say that friction drive is literally a drag on the freewheeling rear tire. It's feels like slacking off the gas in a car, in high gear with a manual transmission.

    When the clutch closes, the heavy drag is still there. In fact, there's LESS drag when the engine is idling at say 5mph, especially if the engine has a high idle speed.
    5-7
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 18, 2008
  11. astring

    astring Member

    It is not a terrible drag, it still peddles ok when not lifted.
     
  12. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    will stronger clutch springs fix this or would they make the engine ingage to late causing roller slippage?
     
  13. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    Clutch seems to work - just perfect - on my Station set up. Springs in clutch are matched perfectly -- any change -- and clutch probably won't work.. Ride That Thing - Mountainman
     
  14. kerf

    kerf Guest

    Drag from the friction roller is caused by tire deflection. If you will set the roller on the tire, under its own weight, drag will be very little as tire deflection will be almost non existent. If you attempt to run under this condition the roller will slip and destroy your tire. If you place a great deal of tension on the roller, it won't slip but deflection induced drag will increase like crazy and the engine won't produce normal speed. If you apply just enough tension so the roller won't slip while holding the bike and going WOT, that's the best you can get.
     
  15. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    Just ride the bike and enjoy it.:cool:
     
  16. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    whenever u ad tougher clutch springs.the motor has to pick up more speed before it ingages.therefore producing more take off horse power cause the motor has more power at higher rpms.i was just wondering if those stronger springs would unlock the shoes from the drum sooner.
     
  17. B.K. Hosken

    B.K. Hosken Member

    I'm glad to hear the Honda35-staton kit is well thought of. I am buying a used one from smittrailfire here on the forums. It's destined for a Rans Rocket recumbent.

    If I'm not mistaken, the centrifugal clutch will engage at a certain RPM's, and until the clutch goes below that certain RPM's it will stay engaged and turn the engine even if the kill switch is on. SO, if you're going down a hill at 20mph (definitely engaged clutch) and you pick up speed, you are turning the engine that whole time. If, however, you slow down at the top of the hill and the clutch DISengages, as long as you don't hit the gas you can freewheel down the hill without the clutch engaging. Even more complicated, if you are freewheeling down that hill and you rev the engine, the clutch will engage and STAY engaged until you slow everything down...Anyone else? Does this sound right?
     
  18. kerf

    kerf Guest

  19. Mountainman

    Mountainman Active Member

    B.K. -- that's about it - once we get used to it - pretty happy with the set up. Once when I first started riding my Station friction drive - I disengaged at the top of a hill and then on the way down touched my throttle - mistake - engine reved up A LOT trying to catch up. Tough little thing -- Happy Riding from - Mountainman
     
  20. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Guest

    Previously, with my Mits engine and 1.125" friction drive, I'd be coasting downhill at 20 mph with engine idling. When I hit the gas, the engine revved to its top end range and coughed and fell flat on its face. With 1.5" roller going the same speed on the same downhill, the engine now revs to its midrange, then accelerates past 30 mph.

    It depends on the roller size, how violently your engine will react.
     
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