wATCH OUT WHEN REPLACING REAR WHEEL

Discussion in 'Rack Mounted Engines' started by vegaspaddy, Aug 14, 2008.

  1. vegaspaddy

    vegaspaddy Member

    i had posted this in my build thread but i think it deserves its own post just to serve as a warning to others.

    On my gebe setup i have replaced my stock wheel with a much heavier duty one with 105 gage spokes.

    Last wheel while out cruising my chain slipped over the largest ring at the top of my cassette and lodged against the spokes, i wasnt going fast about 15mph but it done enough damage to rip two of the spokes completely out of the rim and damage most of the others.

    I had to buy a new wheel and this time i had the shop install a $4 spoke protector between the cassette and the spokes, a simple cheap solution that i hope will help fellow gebe riders and save them the price of a new wheel.....

    YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED

    http://www.motoredbikes.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=10139&d=1218701469

    http://www.motoredbikes.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=10140&d=1218701475

    http://www.motoredbikes.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=10141&d=1218701481
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2008

  2. rossfree

    rossfree Member

    Ouch!

    Sorry to hear of your mishap Vegas. Now I understand what that plastic ring is for behind the cassette. I just rebuilt my wheel with 12 gage spokes and left it off. A technician told me you can just leave it off if you know how to tune your derailer. I might put it back on. I hope you didn't spill.

    Safe travels!

    Ross
     
  3. vegaspaddy

    vegaspaddy Member

    i was lucky i wasnt travelling fast just pedalling along going up a hill, luckily i was able to hit the kill switch but not quick enough to prevent damage.

    The tech guy was right to a certain extent as you can use the rear derailer to limit the travel thus preventing the chain from coming off. However that is under normal pedaling conditions, not with an engine assisting you along, all it takes is one bump and that chain could jump right off.

    Ross my advice would it be to put it back on, since it can only help you and maybe save some greive in the long run. glad to hear you have your bike up and running, it always puts a smile on my face when i can actually ride my bike rather than just stare at my creation waiting to be fired up, happy motoring..
     
  4. eastwoodo4

    eastwoodo4 Member

    yeah thers two screws on the derailer.one of them is to stop the derailer from going down to far.the other is to stop it from going up past a certian point witch yours did.
     
  5. philshannon

    philshannon Guest

    another bad chain possibility

    I also replaced my rear wheel with a gebe stronger spoked wheel and everything worked great until I decided to fool with the derailleur and had to take it off and couldn't get it back on "right" . We all know the story of being able to take something off but not quite getting it back the way it was, anyway I got it back on and it rode fine until the chain came off both sprockets while I was pedaling, coming up to a stop sign, of course I lost balance and came off the bike but was ok put the chain back on and should have realized that it was going to happen again. It did, while I was only going about 15 mph ,this time, the chain , I am almost positive, since I had a concussion and can't remember what happened, ,came off both sprockets and ,hanging loose, got grabbed by the tire enough to throw me off the bike. i was real lucky 1 broken collar bone ,1 rib broken asphalt burns and scrapes all over my face, no damage to the bike . If anyone has any thoughts on my theory of what happened welcome to comment because i would like to get back riding but not until I am sure I have found out what i did wrong in not getting the tension right on the chain. Watch out.
     
  6. psmcd

    psmcd Member

    thrown chain

    Sorry about your tumble Phil. Best thing about a concussion is the too short moment of pain you missed and the excuse you have for anything stupid you do for the rest of your life.

    Chain tension isn't necessarily the problem. Axle alignment, meaning rear sprocket to front chain ring alignment can be an issue. More likely the end range of derailleur movement. Bike stand is necessary to run the bike through all the gear combos and observe what it is doing. Adjustment is more of an art than I have mastered but there are some great instructions on the net. Here's one: http://bicycletutor.com/adjust-rear-derailleur/
     
  7. Hive

    Hive Guest

  8. JemmaUK

    JemmaUK Guest

    Thats where the hub I have has an advantage... if the chain falls off it doesnt jam up in the spoke as it seems to be designed with a space on the wheel side for the chain to fall into.

    Sorry to hear you had problems with yours, although I'd have to say I prefer derailler gearing to Hubs simply because there is less faffing around getting everthing set up and there is better access to cables.

    Jemma xx
     
  9. vegaspaddy

    vegaspaddy Member

    thanks for the link hive still hadnt sorted the shifters but hopefully will be able to get around to it this weekend, the bike is close too been finished, just waiting for a new front fork to arrive and that should do it.....
     
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