Charging/Lighting Systems

Discussion in 'Electrical' started by BigBlue, Dec 14, 2012.

  1. BigBlue

    BigBlue Active Member

    O.K.,

    On my daily touring training sessions, I have a lot of time to think of different systems that could be used on various motor setups for charging batteries and/or electrical systems. Unfortunately, my training takes precedent over my actual working in the garage. I've got a boat load of projects that may never see the light of day. Furthermore, I have a custom motorized touring bike that I am building for a long distance tour.

    Here's a project that is actually almost completed. I have to make another drive shaft. I had to adjust my mini lathe because all my shafts that I made had a taper. If I don't get around to it soon, I may have a local machine shop make the shaft and then finish the other work myself. It is a friction drive system that I made in a intro to welding class at UCD. It is a Cag pocket bike engine with electrical start and generates electricity. They are used on mini quads. I added an additional alternator on the output shaft. It will only generate electricity when the clutch is engaged. I had to taper the end of the shaft to accept the alternator.

    I know that the engine is probably under-powered for the 2 alternators, but it is more of a proof of concept. The 2nd alternator will only work with clock-wise engines. If you tried to run it with a counter clock-wise engine, the alternator would start to unwind from the housing.

    A possible alternative would be a stator from a scooter or small motorcycle. I tried to get Staton to extend the gearbox drive shaft to run a stator, but he wasn't interested.

    Thanks for looking,

    Chris
    AKA: BigBlue

    HPIM0608.jpg
     

  2. BigBlue

    BigBlue Active Member

    O.K. here's another generator idea. Use a gearless, brushless bicycle motor hub. Yes, a motor can be used as a generator. You want a gearless because the geared hubs have unidirectional freewheels that would cause the motor to freewheel and not generate electricity. A front wheel hub would work best. You don't need the controller. It would produce 3 phase A/C , so you would need a rectifier or a voltage regulator to convert from A/C to D/C. It would produce some serious amount of juice. Consider 1 horse power equal approximately 746 Watts, so you don't need a large hub motor. 24 volts would be fine. Maybe 100 to 200 Watt range.

    Here's an affordable hub motor that is brushless, but I don't know and Bike Wagon doesn't know if it gearless. Don't go to the company's website that is labeled on the hub, it has 2 Java Script viruses that my anti-virus program detected.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/221013882072?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649

    Here's some links that prove my concept:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OD1gSx92DuM
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01lPxewKG-Y
    http://www.pilom.com/BicycleElectronics/PedalGen.htm

    Here's a article from Golden Motor forum explaining and providing some good pictures and links of geared hub motors:
    http://goldenmotor.com/SMF/index.php?topic=4095.0

    Here's a video of some building a small generator powered bicycle. It's fun watching the craziness. Probably post it in the future when someone talks of building a hybrid system:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eHYN4VNQj4

    Thanks for reading,

    Chris
    AKA: BigBlue
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
  3. BigBlue

    BigBlue Active Member

    O.K., here's my last idea to generate electricity and have a starter on a Happy Time 2 stroke. My idea came from reading about mid drive electric powered bicycles. Again, a motor can be a generator. Here's a picture of a mid drive powered electric bike:
    MidDrive.jpg

    Here's a possible motor that might work:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/380530773438?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649

    Use a permanent magnetic motor with gear that is mounted similar to the mid drive (I know space would be tight) on the down tube of the bicycle and have a chain attached to the engine via a shaft and gear. The shaft would take place of the nut holding the magneto on the engine. The shaft would be threaded on the end and would hold the magneto onto the engine. Two flat spots would be machined on the shaft to help remove the shaft with a wrench holding the shaft. A hole could be drilled into the cover and a bearing could be added to the housing to help support the shaft or a new thicker housing could be made to hold the bearing and support the shaft. Here's a picture of the magneto shaft:

    123.jpg

    By the way, this could possibly work on a HS 4 stroke, but would have to be attached differently to the engine, as the pull starter would have to be removed and an extension added to the shaft to attach a gear.

    Thanks for reading,

    Chris
    AKA: BigBlue
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2012
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