Noob question about pedaling

Discussion in 'General Questions' started by big-o, Jun 28, 2016.

  1. big-o

    big-o New Member

    I have never had a motorized bicycle before. If you choose not to use the motor can one still pedal without a lot of drag. I still want to use the bike for fitness. I want the motor to help me out on hills and when I get tired. I have congestive heart failure and bike riding is really good for cardio.
     

  2. Frankfort MB's

    Frankfort MB's Well-Known Member

    Yes you can still pedal w/o the engine but there is major chain drag so it is a lot harder to pedal.... The best way to describe pedaling a motor bike is like pedaling a heavy mtn bike in a high gear, you can do it but it's just extra exercise and most people that put motors on bicycles try to AVOID pedaling lol:p
     
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  3. big-o

    big-o New Member

    Thats what I thought. I was only wanting the engine as a backup. I have congestive heart failure and the bike riding is great exercise. i guess I'll not be motorizing my bike after all. Thats a real bummer.
     
  4. Frankfort MB's

    Frankfort MB's Well-Known Member

    Friction drives work well for stuff like your interested in
     
  5. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    Umm. Here is another perspective and something a lot of e-bikers do. They keep the engine on low assist or in your case near idle rpm/speed and then use more power on hills and such. The idle rpm will overcome the engine resist and possibly give you a little assist; you can adjust the idle speed such that it is very near equilibrium with motor resist. Then on hills you would just use more power or turn the throttle. Also, the e-bikers where previously without the ebike would go say 10 miles now they will go 30 miles for the same effect (monitoring heartrate/calories). You get to see more for the same workout.

    Long story short: this has been tackled by e-bikers and in your case, I would get a motor and set the idle speed/power as close to motor resist as possible. It wont use much gas and then just use the motor when you need to go up the hill. You can also set the idle rpm higher and then lower it as you gain more strength in your legs or endurance. I also recommend getting a friction drive in case you want to lift the motor off the wheel for no resist and no engine.
     
  6. big-o

    big-o New Member

    Thats good to hear. Would this bike be a good candidate for the motorized conversion? I know I will have to make some changes to the bike itself, such as changing the shifters out, maybe the neck for the handlebars. At some point add disk brakes. These are things that can be done in steps.
     
  7. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    That looks like a 29" bike. It might require some more work to ease the pineapple ragjoint sprocket in if you are going with an in-frame engine. If you are going with a friction drive, just make sure the tires do not have too many tire knobs in the middle of the tire as friction drives don't work too well with very knobby tires. I know there are tires where the middle is less knobby or flat and the sides are more knobby.

    Also, double check if a 29" frame/tire will take a friction drive. I feel like it should since you can move it up and down the locking bars, but double check.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2016
  8. Tauseef

    Tauseef Member

    Why not disconnect engine side chain by removing its master link and removing chain from cprocket and not from gear of engine . and holding/griping the (now open chain) with cycle body.
    Free to go to bicycle ;)
    And when want engine on , simply put chain over sprocket and connect masterlink.

    What say??
     
  9. hmbab2000

    hmbab2000 Member

    That would work, just don't lose chain link!
     
  10. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    Disconnect the master link in the chain? He is joking, right. That will never be convenient and you should not keep disconnecting the master link unless required since you could bend the connecting pin. Also, you will have a dragging chain, be difficult to reconnect on the road (chain tension), and your hands will be super grimy all the time. He is joking.
     
  11. Tauseef

    Tauseef Member

    i am not joking. keep a small tool with the cycle to remove the Link Pin. hold the chain with a piece of cloth and in 10 seconds you have master link safely off.
    Then , instead of dragging the chain i gave solution to tie it to the frame of cycle where feasible.
    My point is, atleast , instead of GIVING UP the idea of using the motorized bicycle that the guy is thinking, its atleast a convenient way in which he will pedal the cycle with no drag. & yes, SPARE master links are also available.,and if he can learn to how to use it , they ll do wonders for him. See he is upto giving up the idea altogether since, YES there is too much engine drag. well, my thinking, its feasible though. :)
     
  12. hmbab2000

    hmbab2000 Member

    It's probably not convenient, as in a regular removal, but in a need it would work. That chain drag, alone, is tough to pedal with a single gear for any long distance.
     
  13. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    Yeah, its hard to remove the engine drag. I mean you could disconnect the chain but I mean doing that after every hill will make you crazy. Almost the same with the friction drive, it is much easier than disconnecting chain. That is why I suggest that he peddle with the engine in idle (set as low as possible). E-bikers do this with the engine assist set on low and on hills they throttle up. That is what I did on my ebike to conserve battery and I got a great exercise along with power up hills.
     
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  14. big-o

    big-o New Member

    I see now its not an easy task to do what I want, but it can be done. Power assist is the what I'm looking for. Has anyone here set up a bike like this? hears a thought, would it be possible to add a mechanical or centrifugal clutch. This would split the chain, allowing the tire with sprocket to move independently of the motor. When the motor side of the chains reaches a certain RPM clutch pulls in and the motor takes over. There might be a space problem. well after thinking about this idea of a clutch, is it will not work because one could never start the engine. Brain Fart.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2016
  15. So, for what you're trying to do, I would totally recommend an eBike. I've had both, and the electric bike is waayyy less maintenance. They're more expensive, but a better design.

    Also, pedal assist in the eBike is great. It senses the speed off your pedals and adds power accordingly.

    The hub motors have just add much resistance I'd figure, but adding just a little power is much smoother than firing up an engine.

    That's my $0.02. ;)
     
  16. JunkyardDog

    JunkyardDog Active Member

    I would definitely consider friction drive. It works great unless the road is wet. It is what I am using right now. The motor mounts over the rear wheel, and drives the rear tire with a roller. To disengage it, you just loosen one quick release fastener and lift the whole unit above the rear wheel. You do have to get off the bike to do it. For me this is the ideal way to power a bicycle if you don't need gears, like for climbing mountains.

    How much do you plan to ride? I would recommend electric if you don't plan to go far. Most electric bikes have a pedal assist option, which simply uses the electric motor to make pedaling easier. But I would still want one that can be operated with the throttle only, just in case you become unable to pedal, it can get you back home. The big problem with electric bikes is the cost and range limitations compared to gas power. Gas powered bikes are cheap and have unlimited range. Electric bikes are much more expensive, and have limited range. But they are much more like riding a regular bike. They are silent, pedal bike riders don't hate them like gas powered bikes, and they can be ridden anywhere, including bike paths and sidewalks.
     
  17. big-o

    big-o New Member


    Since I have been looking at my options and reading the info on this forum I have became open to an EBike. I found a Hub Motor for around $250-300. I think it is around 1000 watts. I would consider this option if I knew this would do the trick. Does anyone know of a hub motor for a 29 inch or would I need to look at a 26 inch. I thank each and everyone for there advice and opinions here.
     
  18. big-o

    big-o New Member

    The Genesis GS29 that I have been looking at is a 21 speed. The hub motor that i have looked at has space for 6 or 7 gears. Would it be as simple as changing out the shifters on the bike to a 6 or 7 speed to fit the hub motor to the bike. Or would a front wheel hub motor be a better option. Here is a link to the motor i am looking at.
    http://www.leafbike.com/products/di...-rear-hub-motor-bike-conversion-kit-1014.html
     
  19. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    Rear wheel works better due to weight and torque. There are 700c electric kits but they are not common. I've never seen a 29. Also, these motors are sold on eBay too so there might be a cheaper price. The big cost is the battery, which is 300-450 for 48v with good amp hours.

    So then you gotta compare it to a gas friction drive, which is around 250-300 for a 49cc.

    So an electric motor is quiet and with a good battery does the trick but is pricey. A friction drive produces small engine ish noise but has a bit more power and unlimited energy and is cheaper. Plus you can use it like a slow moped if you don't want to pedal.

    Both are insanely easy to put together compare to in frame so you be riding in an hour or so.
     
  20. bakaneko

    bakaneko Active Member

    There are two screws on derailleurs that will help you align the electric hub free wheel to your handle bar shifter. Take a look at youtube videos for examples of how to do this. I don't think this will be a problem for you.
     
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