New Gasbike racer 49cc build

Mr.FrankSmith

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
36
Once you get the feel of it you'll recognize when your clutch locks up.
It's possible to adjust the engagement RPM with lighter/heavier springs if needed.
If you're gonna be spending a lot of time on dirt under 20MPH, you'll have to watch clutch slippage.
I hear what your saying, I'm going for a ride tomorrow that will be longer than usual, but more or less my summer time ride distance, (a few miles) I'll be sure to pay attention to the clutch engagement. Also, sorry for the delayed response work has been crazy lately...
 


Mr.FrankSmith

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
36
We’re you frustrated with the HT falling apart too?

If I can’t get the right parts for the 53cc, I’m going to get the 142.

This bike always gets me going~

Ive been wondering what's the biggest size 4 stroke that would fit in a beach cruiser frame. I definitely want to see how your build goes too, even with the same kits and parts available everybody always finds a way to make their build unique to them.
 

FNTPuck

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2018
Messages
394
Ive been wondering what's the biggest size 4 stroke that would fit in a beach cruiser frame. I definitely want to see how your build goes too, even with the same kits and parts available everybody always finds a way to make their build unique to them.
79cc is the largest feasible for most 26" beach cruiser frames without needing mods. Larger frames like the Felt Bixby and Slant can handle a 212 without any frame mods, but you'd still want to gusset and reinforce it if you plan on any performance mods since the 212 jumps from ~6.5hp all the way up to 10hp with just a couple simple mods. Since it also has more than double the TQ of most common engines, stronger wheels and hubs are a must as well.

If you have a steel frame and can weld though, you can make anything fit, even a big bore motor...just takes a LOT of work to make it reliable since at that point you are replacing every single thing on the bike and only keeping the frame with extensive modifications.
 

Mr.FrankSmith

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
36
79cc is the largest feasible for most 26" beach cruiser frames without needing mods. Larger frames like the Felt Bixby and Slant can handle a 212 without any frame mods, but you'd still want to gusset and reinforce it if you plan on any performance mods since the 212 jumps from ~6.5hp all the way up to 10hp with just a couple simple mods. Since it also has more than double the TQ of most common engines, stronger wheels and hubs are a must as well.

If you have a steel frame and can weld though, you can make anything fit, even a big bore motor...just takes a LOT of work to make it reliable since at that point you are replacing every single thing on the bike and only keeping the frame with extensive modifications.
I think ill stick with 79cc as my next build, I agree tho, these rims weren't built good at all... I can watch these spokes flex and bend with little more than a stern gaze lol.
 

The_Aleman

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 2, 2007
Messages
785
The traditional Schwinn cantilever, aka the "1955 Cantilever" is a design that, IMO, looks nice, and it also has the benefit of having a lotta room just about any engine, even for the big block monsters like the Whizzer 138, Briggs, and HF212. They have so much room, that a chinagirl looks puny in em and often takes a custom front mount because of all the space. My first build used the '55 cantilever, but in aluminum, for example:


Edit - the only problem with Schwinn cantilevers is the rear dropouts tho, they are almost always front-exit/edit

I agree that a 79/97/99 is perhaps the best class of engine tho, if you spend good money on a clutch. Those engines produce nice lazy torque - double the torque of the high-rev engines at a low RPM - and they aren't over 28lbs like a 212, not to mention the bike needed to support such a beast!
 

Frogslayer

Active Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2019
Messages
482
I think ill stick with 79cc as my next build, I agree tho, these rims weren't built good at all... I can watch these spokes flex and bend with little more than a stern gaze lol.
Have you been riding that bike in your picture? Just wondering cause with that idler wheel on the pull side of the pedal chain of you really step on the pedals hard it might move.
 

Mr.FrankSmith

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
36
The traditional Schwinn cantilever, aka the "1955 Cantilever" is a design that, IMO, looks nice, and it also has the benefit of having a lotta room just about any engine, even for the big block monsters like the Whizzer 138, Briggs, and HF212. They have so much room, that a chinagirl looks puny in em and often takes a custom front mount because of all the space. My first build used the '55 cantilever, but in aluminum, for example:


Edit - the only problem with Schwinn cantilevers is the rear dropouts tho, they are almost always front-exit/edit

I agree that a 79/97/99 is perhaps the best class of engine tho, if you spend good money on a clutch. Those engines produce nice lazy torque - double the torque of the high-rev engines at a low RPM - and they aren't over 28lbs like a 212, not to mention the bike needed to support such a beast!
Good info, I can't wait to do a 79cc build I was super impressed by the 2 stroke I had built. That beast would get my 230lbs up to 35 mph and had the torque to climb the craziest hills...
Here's a pic of Death trap right after the wreck...
 

Attachments

Mr.FrankSmith

Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Messages
36
Have you been riding that bike in your picture? Just wondering cause with that idler wheel on the pull side of the pedal chain of you really step on the pedals hard it might move.
I double nutted that one so it wouldn't move, the cheap bolt stripped out so I had to red neck it till i get to a hardware store, but its not going anywhere.... Knock on wood....
 
Top