What am I missing?

BruceBanner1983

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A couple people suggested I would have to reinforce my rear dropouts, but they’re front facing and there shouldnt be any upward pull on the dropouts that the top part of the rear triangle shouldn’t absorb. I’m also going to have shock sissy bars, which will put a downward force on the rear axle. Also, years ago I was told that you can spread the axle to frame load by using fender washers on your axles. It looks like as long as the axle isn’t all the way back, the frame can absorb the load.
 

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A couple people suggested I would have to reinforce my rear dropouts, but they’re front facing and there shouldnt be any upward pull on the dropouts that the top part of the rear triangle shouldn’t absorb. I’m also going to have shock sissy bars, which will put a downward force on the rear axle. Also, years ago I was told that you can spread the axle to frame load by using fender washers on your axles. It looks like as long as the axle isn’t all the way back, the frame can absorb the load.
I just never liked the factory dropouts on bikes. I made my own "track style" dropouts. If you want the file to the I am more than happy to share.
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I just never liked the factory dropouts on bikes. I made my own "track style" dropouts. If you want the file to the I am more than happy to share.
View attachment 201492
Thanks, but I think I’m good. I can see the need to reinforce rear facing dropouts, but mine look like they’ll be just fine. Appreciate the look out though.
 
You’re good at fabbing, I couldn’t do anything like that when I was in high school lol. Heck I can’t do stuff like that now lol.
I made those on the cnc plasma table at school. I designed them on the computer. I could probably make something close to those by hand, it would just take alot longer
 
The pictures below are of the LandRider. The top picture is how the dropout originally looked. One day the chain stay broke loose from the dropout, even though it was a steel frame. I cut a piece of flat steel 1/8" plate looking a little like a 🎸 pick and welded it back up making it have a stronger conection at the two stays.

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With the amount of torque going through your frame, cut out a copy of the dropout to make it thicker and also widen the conection between the stays like I did.
 
It's not really the direction of the axle slots that i the issue, but the thickness of the metal on many bikes in that location tends to be thin or of a lower quality material that lacks strength. From what I can see of yours they will be fine for most engines sold on the market.
 
It's not really the direction of the axle slots that i the issue, but the thickness of the metal on many bikes in that location tends to be thin or of a lower quality material that lacks strength. From what I can see of yours they will be fine for most engines sold on the market.
The ones I replaced on the Columbia were 1/8, the ones I made were 3/16. There is a very noticeable difference between them. The old ones I could bend by hand, these I can't.
 
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